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    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, science, and advanced research, and scientific methods. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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    Scott Adams
    The University of Marylands Center for Celiac Research has received approximately $231,000 in contributions and pledges. We thank all of you who have made a contribution or pledge. As we reported in the September update, when we began this effort back in May of 1977, we suggested that if 1000 Celiacs, relatives or friends would make a commitment to pledge $200 per year for three (3) years, we would be on our way to funding this extremely important study. As of September 1st, we had received only 122 pledges in the amount of $70,335. To date, we have received only 8 additional pledges; however, we did receive a significant number of cash contributions for which we are very grateful.
    For now, we cannot rely on any outside financial assistance. So please, help us to help you. Remember we are not asking you to make a contribution, but to make an investment in the well being of every celiac - now and in the future. We wanted to advise everyone that due to circumstances beyond our control our voice mail line 410 706-2715 crashed on December 20th. The problem was corrected on January 11th; however, all messages that were left during that time were lost. We apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused.

    Scott Adams
    Currently, the Center for Celiac Research is involved in two critical areas:
    * Multi-Center Serological Screening Study to determine the prevalence of Celiac Disease in the United States; and
    * New Diagnostic Assay to develop a non-invasive diagnostic test for Celiac Disease.
    1) SEROLOGIC SCREENING STUDY
    We have tested 3,076 samples as part of the Multi-Center Serological Study for the prevalence of Celiac Disease in the United States. Our preliminary findings indicate that 6.8% of first-degree relatives and 4.7% of second-degree relatives of Celiacs test positive for the disease. These results are similar to those reported previously in Europe, suggesting that Celiac Disease is currently under-diagnosed in the United States.We are extremely encouraged by these preliminary findings; however, many more subjects need to be screened to put the study into full operation. Your financial help is pivotal to accomplish our goals.
    2) NEW DIAGNOSTIC ASSAY
    Our scientists have been able to develop a more sensitive, non-invasive, and specific test for Celiac Disease based on the use of tissue transglutaminase. We were able, for the first time, to clone the human transglutaminase gene. By using this tool, we have developed a new diagnostic tool that may eventually allow us to make a definite diagnosis of Celiac Disease without an intestinal biopsy.
    BLOOD SCREENING UPDATE
    Blood screenings of first and second-degree relatives have been conducted in New York, North Carolina, New Hampshire, California, Pennsylvania, Washington, Maryland, Texas, and Rhode Island.Screenings are scheduled for Billings, Montana June 19th, Louisville, Kentucky September, 18th and Vermont (to be scheduled in Oct/Nov.)
    WEB SITE
    Thanks to the sponsorship of Dietary Specialties, we are very excited to announce that the Center for Celiac Research will have a web site. The domain name will be www.celiaccenter.org. and should be on line by June 21st.
    FUND-RAISING UPDATE
    As of June 1, 1999, the University of Marylands Center for Celiac Research has received approximately $340,000 in contributions and pledges. We thank all of you who have made a contribution or pledge. The Center was very fortunate to receive three significant pledges/contributions over the past four months which helped boost our contribution total by more than $100,000 since our last update. Although this is a significant increase, we must keep the momentum going.
    For now, we cannot rely on any outside financial assistance. So please, help us to help you. Remember we are not asking you to make a contribution, but to make an investment in the well being of every celiac - now and in the future.
    NINTH INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON CELIAC DISEASE
    The Center for Celiac Research, the University of Maryland Program for Continuing Education, the University of Chicago, and the University of California, San Diego are pleased to announce joint sponsorship of the Ninth International Symposium on Celiac Disease. The symposium will be held August 10-13, 2000 at the Marriotts Hunt Valley Inn, Hunt Valley, Maryland.
    The medical program to be presented will discuss the most advanced knowledge of the genetic, immunological, and diagnostic aspects of Celiac Disease. In addition, a panel of international experts will discuss new frontiers for the treatment and prevention of Celiac Disease. Celiacs from around the world will be given the opportunity to compare
    the practical aspects of living with Celiac Disease in different countries and cultures at a full day session. Registration information and costs will be available in August and will be posted on the web site.
    WHAT CAN YOU DO?
    If you have not made a pledge or contribution, please consider making one at this time. Please make checks payable to the UM Foundation, Inc. Center for Celiac Research, Attn: Pam King, 700 W. Lombard St. Room 206, Baltimore, MD 21201. These funds are administered by the University of Maryland Foundation, Inc. If possible, increase your current pledge or make another gift at this time. Discuss the importance of this study with fellow celiacs, relatives, friends or whoever might be in a position to help. Ask them to contribute. Organize discussions and/or fund-raising efforts with your local support group. For example, Tri-County Celiac Sprue from Walled Lake, MI organized a bake sale and the Greater Louisville Celiac Sprue Support Group organized a walk/run event. Both donated the proceeds to the Center. Help us to identify possible organization, companies, trusts or foundations that might be in a position to help. Please contact Pam King at 410-706-8021 if you have any questions or need any assistance. Send contributions to the Center for Celiac Research in honor or in memory of a friend or loved one. Make a gift to the Center in honor of the new year.

    Scott Adams
    Currently, the Center for Celiac Research is involved in three critical research areas:
    Multi-Center Serological Screening Study to determine the prevalence of Celiac Disease in the United States We have tested 3,998 individuals as part of the Multi-Center Serological Study for the prevalence of Celiac Disease in the United States. Our preliminary findings indicate that 5.7% of first -degree relatives and 3.1% of second degree relatives of celiacs test positive for the disease. These results are similar to those reported previously in Europe, suggesting that Celiac Disease is currently under-diagnosed in the United States.
    We are extremely encouraged by these preliminary findings; however, many more subjects need to be screened to put the study into full operation. Your financial help is pivotal to accomplish our goals.
    New Diagnostic Assay to develop a non-invasive diagnostic test for Celiac Disease Our scientists have been able to develop a more sensitive, non-invasive, and specific test for Celiac Disease based on the use of tissue transglutaminase. We were able, for the first time, to clone the human tTG gene. Our preliminary results show that the human TtG assay performs much better than the commerically-available tests (including anti-endomysium antibodies and guinea pig-based transglutaminase assay).
    New Dot-Blot Assay We have developed a human tTG dot-blot test based on the detection of anti-tTG antibodies in serum or in one drop of whole blood, which can be carried out within thirty minutes. The preliminary results of the dot-blot assay indicate that the assay is as reliable as the human tTG ELISA test, making the diagnosis of Celiac Disease possible at the physicians ambulatory site.
    If the sensitivity and specificity of these tests can be confirmed on a large scale, a case can be made on the possible discontinuation of the invasive intestinal biopsy procedure as the gold standard for the diagnosis of celiac disease. This would result in early identification and treatment for patients with celiac disease at a significant cost savings. We will continue to validate these innovative tests during the future blood screenings.
    BLOOD SCREENINGS
    Blood screenings of first and second degree relatives have been conducted in California, Kentucky, Maryland, Montana, Pennsylvania, New Hampshire, New York, North Carolina, Rhode Island, Texas, and Washington state.
    FUND-RAISING UP-DATE
    We are happy to report that as of September 1, 1999, the University of Marylands Center for Celiac Research has received approximately $369,494.00 in contributions and pledges. We thank all of you who have made a contribution or pledge.
    As we reported in the June update, when we began this effort back in May of 1977, we suggested that if 1000 Celiacs, relatives or friends would make a commitment to pledge $200 per year for three (3) years, we would be on our way to funding this extremely important study.
    For now, we cannot rely on any outside financial assistance. So please, help us to help you. Remember we are not asking you to make a contribution, but to make an investment in the well being of every celiac - now and in the future.
    DONATION CHECKS
    Please make all donation checks payable to the University of Maryland Foundation, Inc. and send with the pledge form or a note saying that the donation is for the Center for Celiac Research. Since the University of Maryland Foundation, Inc. houses all the gift funds for the University, they are not permitted to deposit checks into the Celiac account if the check is not made payable to the University of Maryland Foundation, Inc. Thanks for your cooperation.
    UNITED WAY CONTRIBUTIONS
    This is another great way to make a gift to the Center for Celiac Research and satisfy your employers request to participate in the United Way Appeal. Please designate under Other The University of Maryland Foundation/Center for Celiac Research, 511 W. Lombard St, Baltimore, MD 21201.
    OTHER WAYS OF GIVING TO THE CENTER
    For many, providing for important research is an important aspect of their financial planning. If this is true for you, prudent and skillful investment planning can create rewarding opportunities for both you and the Center for Celiac Research. You may interested to know, for example, that:
    Appreciated securities, held long-term, can be given to the Center without incurring a capital gains tax. And, the full fair market value of the securities is available as a charitable deduction. Life insurance that is no longer needed for family or business protection can provide major support for the Center while producing important tax savings for you. Participation in a pooled income fund or the establishment of a charitable trust, using appreciated securities, for the eventual benefit of the Center can be an excellent means of increasing your spendable income and minimizing income, capital gains, estate and inheritance taxes. The final opportunity to express your lasting commitment to the Center for Celiac Research at the University of Maryland School of Medicine is through your will or revocable trust. Of course, charitable bequests are not subject to the federal gift tax and are not included in the taxable estate for federal estate tax purpose. WEB SITE
    Our web site, celiaccenter.org, has been on line since the middle of June. The research and fundraising updates, as well as updates on the Ninth International Symposium on Celiac Disease, individual and group screening information, blood screening locations, and donation information will be posted on the web site.
    NINTH INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON CELIAC DISEASE
    The Center for Celiac Research at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, the University of Chicago, and the University of California, San Diego are pleased to announce joint sponsorship of the Ninth International Symposium on Celiac Disease to be held August 10-13, 2000 in Baltimore, Maryland. A brochure outlining the program, and registration and hotel information will be distributed to all group leaders throughout the country, and additional brochures will be made available to them for distribution to their members. We anticipate a very large attendance so we advise you to register as soon as possible.
    WHAT CAN YOU DO?
    If you have not made a pledge or contribution, please consider making one at this time. Please make checks payable to the UM Foundation, Inc. Center for Celiac Research, Attn: Pam King, 700 W. Lombard St. Room 206, Baltimore, MD 21201. These funds are administered by the University of Maryland Foundation, Inc. If possible, increase your current pledge or make another gift at this time. Discuss the importance of this study with fellow celiacs, relatives, friends or whoever might be in a position to help. Ask them to contribute. Organize discussions and/or fund-raising efforts with your local support group. Help us to identify possible organization, companies, trusts or foundations that might be in a position to help. Please contact Pam King at 410-706-8021 if you have any questions or need any assistance. Send contributions to the Center for Celiac Research in honor or in memory of a friend or loved one. Make a gift to the Center in honor of the holidays.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/16/2014 - Information about the number of cases and and overall rates of celiac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis in the UK have not been well studied over time, either by region or by age. Yet, this type of information is essential for determining potential causes and quantifying the impact of these diseases.
    To provide this information, a team of researchers recently conducted a population-based study to assess incidence and prevalence of celiac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis in the UK over two decades.
    The researchers included J. West, K.M. Fleming, L.J. Tata, T.R. Card, and C.J. Crooks. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Epidemiology and Public Health, City Hospital Campus, The University of Nottingham, the NIHR Biomedical Research Unit in Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, and the Division of Epidemiology and Public Health at the City Hospital Campus of The University of Nottingham in Nottingham, UK.
    They used the Clinical Practice Research Datalink to identify patients with celiac disease or dermatitis herpetiformis between 1990 and 2011, and calculated incidence rates and prevalence by age, sex, year, and region of residence. They found a total of 9,087 incident cases of celiac disease and 809 incident cases of dermititis herpetiformis.
    From 1990 to 2011, the incidence rate of celiac disease rose from 5.2 per 100,000 (95% confidence interval (CI), 3.8-6.8) to 19.1 per 100,000 person-years (95% CI, 17.8-20.5; IRR, 3.6; 95% CI, 2.7-4.8). During that same period, incidence of dermatitis herpetiformis decreased from 1.8 per 100,000 to 0.8 per 100,000 person-years (average annual IRR, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.94-0.97).
    The absolute incidence of celiac disease per 100,000 person-years ranged from 22.3 in Northern Ireland to 10 in London. Celiac disease showed large regional variations in prevalence, while dermatitis herpetiformis did not.
    The team found a fourfold increase in the incidence of celiac disease in the United Kingdom over 22 years, with large regional variations in prevalence.
    This contrasted with a 4% annual decrease in the incidence of dermatitis herpetiformis, with minimal regional variations in prevalence.
    These contrasts could reflect differences in diagnosis between celiac disease (serological diagnosis and case finding) and dermatitis herpetiformis (symptomatic presentation) or the possibility that diagnosing and treating celiac disease prevents the development of dermatitis herpetiformis.
    Source:
    Am J Gastroenterol. 2014 May;109(5):757-68. doi: 10.1038/ajg.2014.55. Epub 2014 Mar 25.

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    As long as they are going down, you should be happy.  The celiac blood tests were meant to help diagnose celiac disease, but not to monitor the gluten-free diet.  However, it is the only non-evasive “tool in the toolbox” for now.  You can expect for those numbers to take a year or so to come down.  It all depends on how well you do on the diet and how your body responds.  Everyone is different!   Welcome tomthe forum.  
    This is the list I use to start. And then if there is tocopherol/Vitamin E in anything, even if it states it is gluten-free, I write or call the company and find out their source of Vitamin E. If they don't know or won't tell me, I avoid the product.  http://www.glutenfreemakeupgal.com/gluten-info/not-safe/possibly-gluten-filled-ingredients
    @GlutenTootin As mentioned above, limit your carb intake, removing starches, and sugars. Many gluten-free bread/baked products are mostly starches which will be fermented in your gut into gas. Seriously look at the ingredients, all those grain flours, starches etc. Look for nut-based ones with NO starches if you want to enjoy something without the gas. For the most part stick to a whole foods diet, leafy greens, low carb veggies, and meats. Cook them til they are super soft and tender like
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