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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Takeda Taps PvP Biologics to Develop Celiac Disease Therapy


    Caption: Photo: CC--Kathy & Sam

    Celiac.com 03/10/2017 - PvP Biologics, a business spun out of the University of Washington, now has a $35 million deal with Takeda Pharmaceutical to develop its therapy for celiac disease. PvP Biologics is developing an enzyme that can be taken orally and survive in the harsh acidic environment of the stomach. That enzyme is called KumaMax.

    Under the terms of the agreement, Takeda will fund $35 million in PvP's research and development of the therapy through phase 1 clinical trials. The agreement gives Takeda Pharmaceutical the exclusive option to acquire PvP for an undisclosed fee upon successful completion.

    PvP Biologics has its roots in a University of Washington tech incubator program, but spun out on its own in 2016, in advance of its arrangement with Takeda.

    Says Adam Simpson, president and CEO of PvP Biologics, "Takeda's GI experience and capabilities are a great fit with our goal of developing a novel oral enzyme therapy to make a meaningful impact on the lives of people with celiac disease."

    The enzyme-driven KumaMax works by targeting gliadin, the parts of gluten that cause the autoimmune reaction leading to celiac disease. The company hopes to prevent the adverse immune reaction seen in celiac sufferers, by breaking down the gliadin.

    Like most similar enzyme therapies, KumaMax is not designed to be a cure for celiac disease. It is designed to help prevent adverse reactions from accidental gluten contamination.

    In a statement by the company, Asit Parikh, head of the gastroenterology therapeutic area for Takeda, says that "KumaMax could address a significant unmet need for celiac patients who are unable to completely avoid gluten exposure in their diets, and thus continue to experience debilitating symptoms."

     Read more at BizJournals.com.


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    "KumaMax is not designed to be a cure for celiac disease. It is designed to help prevent adverse reactions from accidental gluten contamination."An incredible waste of time and even worse a lot of money that should be spent for curing celiac.

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    This is an incredible waste of time and an enormous amount of money - really for just a band aid, not a cure. Put the time and money to better use looking for an actual cure!!

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    "KumaMax is not designed to be a cure for celiac disease. It is designed to help prevent adverse reactions from accidental gluten contamination."An incredible waste of time and even worse a lot of money that should be spent for curing celiac.

    There are many people who would like to eat out in restaurants, or who travel for a living. For those people such a product could be helpful.

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    This is an incredible waste of time and an enormous amount of money - really for just a band aid, not a cure. Put the time and money to better use looking for an actual cure!!

    Plenty of people would welcome such treatment options. Others might not. I don't see the world as being better off because such treatments are being developed.

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    "KumaMax is not designed to be a cure for celiac disease. It is designed to help prevent adverse reactions from accidental gluten contamination."An incredible waste of time and even worse a lot of money that should be spent for curing celiac.

    Currently, there are numerous efforts to develop new and effective therapies, treatments and even vaccines for celiac disease. Compare that to just ten years ago. A private company putting private money into researching enzyme therapy doesn't really hurt people with celiac disease. Some might welcome protection against moderate gluten contamination.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, science, and advanced research, and scientific methods. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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