• Join our community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

  • Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsSubscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

  • Member Statistics

    77,652
    Total Members
    3,093
    Most Online
    Gravox
    Newest Member
    Gravox
    Joined
  • 0

    Teen Supplies Gluten-free Food to Folks in Need


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 01/20/2011 - Over his five years as a participant in Project Bread’s annual Walk for Hunger, 16-year-old high school sophomore, Pierce Keegan came to realize that more needed to be done to supply gluten-free food to people in need.


    Ads by Google:




    ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW ADS
    Ads by Google:



    “When I was doing the Walk for Hunger, I suddenly thought, ‘What if I needed food? Would I be able to get gluten-free products if I couldn’t afford them?’’’

    Inspired by his success in raising nearly $5,000 for Project Bread, Keegan founded Pierce’s Pantry to supply gluten-free food to people who need food, and need that food to be gluten-free.

    Pierce's Pantry officially launched on January 1st, 2011, and  collects and distributes gluten-free products to local food pantries. Keegan has so far received donations from 12 food manufacturers, and collected nearly 800 pounds of gluten-free food.

    The Acton Food Pantry in Boxborough is the first food service to make Keegan’s gluten-free products available to clients, and has also agreed to provide emergency bags of gluten-free food for those in need.

    “I’ve been fortunate enough to eat and have access to gluten-free food,’’ said Keegan, “but there are many celiacs out there who can’t afford it, and have to make choices between either eating unsafe foods or not eating at all.’’

    Keegan wants to eventually expand Pierce’s Pantry nationwide, and eventually to accommodate other food allergies.

    ’“The Acton Food Pantry told me about this woman they gave a whole bag of gluten-free products to and the woman started crying,’’ said Keegan. “It showed me that this could really make a difference, after hearing how just one bag of food changed another person’s life so drastically.’’

    Read more or donate to Pierce's Pantry.

    0


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    What a great story! My kids are young (oldest is almost 6) and we've traditionally bought extra food for our local food pantry when we shop so the kids can donate it. Now that they've been diagnosed with celiac, we're making up gluten-free and allergen-free bags to donate.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I too have wondered what I would do if I were in need and had no realistic access to gluten free food. I wish Pierce success in expanding his pantry nationwide. Bravo!

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Alison Curphey

    Posted

    I am so happy that you wrote about Pierce's Pantry. What an incredible effort by an incredible young man. I can't imagine having to choose between my health and hunger.

     

    I've contacted my local food pantry to see if they would be interested in carrying gluten free food for their clients. I wouldn't have known that this resource existed unless this article had appeared, so thanks again!

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    This is very inspiring, the Gluten-Free breads and other foods can be expensive, and people on tight budgets will just go without, or eat whatever they can.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

    Guest
    You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Ads by Google:

  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. He has covered Health News for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. His work has appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate, among others.

  • Popular Contributors

  • Ads by Google:

  • Who's Online   10 Members, 0 Anonymous, 390 Guests (See full list)

  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    Celiac.com 12/06/2005 - Alek Komarnitsky from Lafayette, CO (USA) has had thousands of Christmas lights on his house for the enjoyment of friends and neighbors since 2000. In 2002, he added a webcam and webcontrol, so people on the Internet could not only view his lights, but turn them on & off and see the results on their computer screen via the Christmas webcam. It got increasingly popular each year, and in 2004, a media frenzy erupted over it and the story went around the world on the Internet, in print, on radio, and on TV - one of the more entertaining segments was when Denver ABC-7 took him up in their helicopter for a live report on the 6:00 News of the blinking lights.
    There was only one problem - it was all a fun little Christmas hoax. The lights were real, but a sequence of still images were used to provide the illusion that people were changing them. Aleks wife was changing the lights when the chopper was overhead, but the rest of the time they never changed!
    Concerned that his prank had gotten out of hand, Alek approached the Wall Street Journal to fess up and High Tech Holiday Light Display Draws Everyone But the Skeptics revealed the hoax after Christmas. Needless to say, the media howled over this change of events, and another round of international publicity ensued as people around the world got a good post-holiday chuckle.
    For 2005, Alek suggests a headline of High Tech Holiday Display Says Bring on the Skeptics! With improved technology available, he has three (real) ChristmasCams (three more than last year!) providing real-time views of his 26,000 Christmas Lights. And using X10 power line control technology, people on the Internet really can them on and off this year. He adds Ill be sure to have it operational on Christmas Eve so web surfers can look for Santa, but realistically, I doubt well get a picture of Rudolph landing on my roof .... but HEY, you never know!
    Aleks children
    - Dirk and Kyle While www.komar.org has always been free to Internet surfers around the world, Alek encourages those people who enjoy the Christmas lights show to consider making a direct contribution to the CFCR. Aleks two sons have celiac disease, so this cause is important to him. Individuals and companies that donate are listed on the high traffic web site for Christmas lights fans around the world to see.
    And in keeping with Aleks whimsical nature, he has donated the Christmas Lights Webcam that Fooled the World to the CFCR. There actually was a webcam last year, since as the media showed up at his house in droves, he figured he should put something up in the tree across the street to make it look like there was one. So he a cobbled together a contraption of a Christmas slide projector ($10), a half a roll of duct tape ($2), and ended up fooling the world - PRICELESS!
    The CFCR plans to have an eBay auction in December of this well constructed piece of history - again, 100% of proceeds for Celiac Research. So for those that missed out on the $28,000 Virgin Mary French Toast, get ready for the eBay auction of the The Christmas Lights Webcam that Fooled the World.
    Make a donation at the University of Marylands Center for Celiac Disease Research
    And be sure to say For Christmas Lights when make your donation.

    Scott Adams
    A little boy with a severe seizure disorder had his wish to have a special bike of his own granted through national children’s charity Kids Wish Network.
    Champaign, IL, August 14, 2010 --(PR.com)-- As a child, Joshua was diagnosed with having Intractable Epilepsy, a disorder in which he experiences seizures that are completely uncontrollable; he currently endures around four major seizures a day. Over the years, Joshua’s doctors have tried well over 10 different seizure medications to try and regulate his condition, but none have worked, including the 3 he is currently taking.
    Because of the severity of his condition, Joshua also suffers from developmental delays that have impaired his motor skills to the point where he cannot do much of anything without assistance; his communication skills are very limited. In addition, Joshua was diagnosed with having Celiac Disease, which is a condition that negatively affects his digestive tract when he eats foods that contain gluten. Because of this, Joshua must follow a strict diet that excludes the many foods that have gluten in them, including all wheat-based foods.
    It was a teacher of Joshua’s who told his mother Janet about national children’s charity Kids Wish Network and the wishes they grant to kids like Joshua who are suffering from life-threatening illnesses; Joshua’s mother decided to give them a call.
    Of all the things he could want, all Joshua wanted was a special bike so that he could ride beside his grandfather during the bike rides he enjoys so much; he previously had to ride behind his grandfather in a special seat.
    With an amazing amount of local support from the Westminster Presbyterian Church and the Champaign Firefighters Local 1260, Joshua’s Kids Wish Network wish coordinator arranged for a special side by side “trike” to be sent directly to his house.
    Janet says that her son Joshua took to the brand new side by side bike immediately.
    “It’s very amazing for him because it usually takes him a while to get used to new things, but since he’s gotten the bike, he’s actually requested going for a ride… he goes out to the garage and stands by it. It’s amazing for him,” said Janet.
    “He really likes being right up there next to his grandpa and seeing everything…he’ll even lean over and pat him [his grandpa] on his arm or kiss him…Joshua’s smiling a lot and he’s even laughed a few times, too! This is not usual. I mean, before (on rides) he’d sometimes smile, but not like this.”
    Not only is the “wish bike” something to bring a smile to Joshua’s face, but it is also a chance for Joshua to learn things he might not have ever have had the chance to learn.
    According to Janet, “It’s going to grow with him. It’s a possibility for him to learn to pedal… he’s even put his hand on the handlebars several times, imitating his grandpa. He’s interested and it’s wonderful.”
    Kids Wish Network would like to thank the following for helping to make Joshua’s wish extra special: Westminster Presbyterian Church, Champaign Firefighters Local 1260 and the Worksman Trading Corporation.
    Kids Wish Network is a nationally recognized non-profit organization dedicated to infusing hope, creating happy memories, and improving the quality of life for children in crisis. Every child deserves a chance at happiness; a wish is just a way of bringing them that joy. If you would like to sponsor a child’s wish or if you know a child who is suffering from a life-threatening illness and may be in need of Kids Wish Network’s wish granting services, please call 727-937-3600 or toll free 888-918-9004. For more information on Kids Wish Network, visit their website at www.kidswishnetwork.org


    Diana Gitig Ph.D.
    Celiac.com 05/23/2011 - ImmusanT, Inc., a biotechnology start up based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, is testing a vaccine to desensitize celiac patients to gluten. It is called Nexvax2, and it has already passed Phase I clinical trials, which means that it is safe and tolerable to humans. Nexvax2 is slated to begin Phase II trials, which address efficacy, within the next year.
    Nexvax2 was developed by Nexpep Pty, Ltd., a company in Melbourne, Australia. It is based on their findings that only three peptides are responsible for eliciting the majority of the T cell response that goes on to destroy the intestines of celiac patients. HLA molecules function to present these toxic peptides to T cells; this presentation is what activates the T cells, instigating the inflammatory response. Thus, this vaccine relies on the HLA type. It is specific for celiacs with the HLA-DQ2 haplotype, accounting for about 90% of celiac patients. Nexvax2 encompasses these three proprietary peptides, presenting them to T cells in the absence of a second, T-cell stimulatory signal. T cell recognition of the HLA-DQ2 bound toxic peptides thus occurs in a non-inflammatory environment, establishing tolerance to dietary gluten. This peptide based approach has been successful in generating tolerance in people with cat-sensitive asthma, and has not been used more broadly because it has been difficult to identify the correct toxic epitopes. Similar efforts are underway to discover and develop peptide-based therapeutic vaccines for other autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis, Type-1 diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis, but celiac disease is an ideal target for the technology because the HLA types that activate the inflammatory T cells in celiac disease are so well defined.
    The vaccine consists of a weekly or monthly injection, and would allow those with celiac disease to resume eating "normal" levels of gluten without suffering adverse effects. Other therapies that have proposed to treat celiac disease, such as those promoted by the companies Alva, Alba, and Chemocentryx, did not aim to replace the gluten free diet; they allowed only small, intermittent exposure to gluten. During the Phase I trial of Nexvax2, some people who got the injections containing the highest doses of the toxic peptides suffered gastrointestinal distress; they thus inadvertently acted as a positive control, indicating that the peptides administered are in fact the correct ones.
    ImmusanT is also partnering with INOVA Diagnostics to use reactivity to these peptides as a diagnostic test both for celiac disease and for those celiac patients who might be good candidates for the Nexvax2 vaccine - i.e. those 90% who are HLA-DQ2 rather than those who are HLA-DQ8.
    Source:

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110509091559.htm

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/26/2013 - There are a number of highly specific and sensitive blood tests that can be used in diagnosing celiac disease; however histological examination of a biopsy taken by endoscopy remains the gold standard for celiac diagnosis.
    However, not every patient wants to undergo an endoscopy, and many will happily undergo additional blood tests to avoid or delay endoscopy.
    In an effort to help clinicians make accurate celiac diagnosis without endoscopy and biopsy, the company Nestec S.A. of Vevey, Switzerland, a research and testing subsidiary of Nestlé has obtained U.S. Patent No. 8,409,819, entitled "Methods to predict risk for celiac disease by detecting anti-flagellin antibody levels."
    The inventors have shown that a subset of at risk patients had elevated anti-CBir1 antibodies and that this correlated with HLA-DQ2.5 and HLA-DQ8 genotypes.
    The inventors showed that a group at risk patients have elevated anti-CBir1 antibodies that correlate with HLA-DQ2.5 and HLA-DQ8 genotypes.
    Their patent contains two independent claims, numbers 1 and 9, each of which describes a method to aid in predicting whether a patient who is EMA positive, or who has a relative with celiac disease, is at risk for developing celiac disease.
    Each method relies on the CBir1 flagellin antigen, specifically the N-terminal residues 1-147, to determine whether or not a sample from an at-risk patient contains anti-CBir1 flagellin antibodies.
    Flagellin is a part of what makes up bacterial flagella, the molecular mechanism that drives the propeller-like motion in bacteria. The inventors theorize that individuals at risk for celiac disease may have an aggressive immune response to resident bacterial proteins, in this case flagellin.
    This method for predicting celiac disease risk may help clinicians to diagnose patients who wish to avoid endoscopy, or who wish additional tests before doing so. The new patent also notes that the method might help to identify patients at risk of developing celiac disease before any symptoms are present.

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/21/2018 - Would you buy a house advertised as ‘gluten-free’? Yes, there really is such a house for sale. 
    It seems a Phoenix realtor Mike D’Elena is hoping that his trendy claim will catch the eye of a buyer hungry to avoid gluten, or, at least one with a sense of humor. D’Elena said he crafted the ads as a way to “be funny and to draw attention.” The idea, D’Elena said, is to “make it memorable.” 
    Though D’Elena’s marketing seeks to capitalizes on the gluten-free trend, he knows Celiac disease is a serious health issue for some people. “[W]e’re not here to offend anybody….this is just something we're just trying to do to draw attention and do what's best for our clients," he said. 
    Still, the signs seem to be working. D'elena had fielded six offers within a few days of listing the west Phoenix home.
    "Buying can sometimes be the most stressful thing you do in your entire life so why not have some fun with it," he said. 
    What do you think? Clever? Funny?
    Read more at Arizonafamily.com.

    Advertising Banner-Ads
    Bakery On Main started in the small bakery of a natural foods market on Main Street in Glastonbury, Connecticut. Founder Michael Smulders listened when his customers with Celiac Disease would mention the lack of good tasting, gluten-free options available to them. Upon learning this, he believed that nobody should have to suffer due to any kind of food allergy or dietary need. From then on, his mission became creating delicious and fearlessly unique gluten-free products that were clean and great tasting, while still being safe for his Celiac customers!
    Premium ingredients, bakeshop delicious recipes, and happy customers were our inspiration from the beginning— and are still the cornerstones of Bakery On Main today. We are a fiercely ethical company that believes in integrity and feels that happiness and wholesome, great tasting food should be harmonious. We strive for that in everything we bake in our dedicated gluten-free facility that is GFCO Certified and SQF Level 3 Certified. We use only natural, NON-GMO Project Verified ingredients and all of our products are certified Kosher Parve, dairy and casein free, and we have recently introduced certified Organic items as well! 
    Our passion is to bake the very best products while bringing happiness to our customers, each other, and all those we meet!
    We are available during normal business hours at: 1-888-533-8118 EST.
    To learn more about us at: visit our site.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/20/2018 - Currently, the only way to manage celiac disease is to eliminate gluten from the diet. That could be set to change as clinical trials begin in Australia for a new vaccine that aims to switch off the immune response to gluten. 
    The trials are set to begin at Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre. The vaccine is designed to allow people with celiac disease to consume gluten with no adverse effects. A successful vaccine could be the beginning of the end for the gluten-free diet as the only currently viable treatment for celiac disease. That could be a massive breakthrough for people with celiac disease.
    USC’s Clinical Trials Centre Director Lucas Litewka said trial participants would receive an injection of the vaccine twice a week for seven weeks. The trials will be conducted alongside gastroenterologist Dr. James Daveson, who called the vaccine “a very exciting potential new therapy that has been undergoing clinical trials for several years now.”
    Dr. Daveson said the investigational vaccine might potentially restore gluten tolerance to people with celiac disease.The trial is open to adults between the ages of 18 and 70 who have clinically diagnosed celiac disease, and have followed a strict gluten-free diet for at least 12 months. Anyone interested in participating can go to www.joinourtrials.com.
    Read more at the website for Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre.

    Source:
    FoodProcessing.com.au

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/19/2018 - Could baking soda help reduce the inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease? Scientists at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University say that a daily dose of baking soda may in fact help reduce inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease.
    Those scientists recently gathered some of the first evidence to show that cheap, over-the-counter antacids can prompt the spleen to promote an anti-inflammatory environment that could be helpful in combating inflammatory disease.
    A type of cell called mesothelial cells line our body cavities, like the digestive tract. They have little fingers, called microvilli, that sense the environment, and warn the organs they cover that there is an invader and an immune response is needed.
    The team’s data shows that when rats or healthy people drink a solution of baking soda, the stomach makes more acid, which causes mesothelial cells on the outside of the spleen to tell the spleen to go easy on the immune response.  "It's most likely a hamburger not a bacterial infection," is basically the message, says Dr. Paul O'Connor, renal physiologist in the MCG Department of Physiology at Augusta University and the study's corresponding author.
    That message, which is transmitted with help from a chemical messenger called acetylcholine, seems to encourage the gut to shift against inflammation, say the scientists.
    In patients who drank water with baking soda for two weeks, immune cells called macrophages, shifted from primarily those that promote inflammation, called M1, to those that reduce it, called M2. "The shift from inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory profile is happening everywhere," O'Connor says. "We saw it in the kidneys, we saw it in the spleen, now we see it in the peripheral blood."
    O'Connor hopes drinking baking soda can one day produce similar results for people with autoimmune disease. "You are not really turning anything off or on, you are just pushing it toward one side by giving an anti-inflammatory stimulus," he says, in this case, away from harmful inflammation. "It's potentially a really safe way to treat inflammatory disease."
    The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health.
    Read more at: Sciencedaily.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/18/2018 - Celiac disease has been mainly associated with Caucasian populations in Northern Europe, and their descendants in other countries, but new scientific evidence is beginning to challenge that view. Still, the exact global prevalence of celiac disease remains unknown.  To get better data on that issue, a team of researchers recently conducted a comprehensive review and meta-analysis to get a reasonably accurate estimate the global prevalence of celiac disease. 
    The research team included P Singh, A Arora, TA Strand, DA Leffler, C Catassi, PH Green, CP Kelly, V Ahuja, and GK Makharia. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Lady Hardinge Medical College, New Delhi, India; Innlandet Hospital Trust, Lillehammer, Norway; Centre for International Health, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Gastroenterology Research and Development, Takeda Pharmaceuticals Inc, Cambridge, MA; Department of Pediatrics, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy; Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; USA Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; and the Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.
    For their review, the team searched Medline, PubMed, and EMBASE for the keywords ‘celiac disease,’ ‘celiac,’ ‘tissue transglutaminase antibody,’ ‘anti-endomysium antibody,’ ‘endomysial antibody,’ and ‘prevalence’ for studies published from January 1991 through March 2016. 
    The team cross-referenced each article with the words ‘Asia,’ ‘Europe,’ ‘Africa,’ ‘South America,’ ‘North America,’ and ‘Australia.’ They defined celiac diagnosis based on European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition guidelines. The team used 96 articles of 3,843 articles in their final analysis.
    Overall global prevalence of celiac disease was 1.4% in 275,818 individuals, based on positive blood tests for anti-tissue transglutaminase and/or anti-endomysial antibodies. The pooled global prevalence of biopsy-confirmed celiac disease was 0.7% in 138,792 individuals. That means that numerous people with celiac disease potentially remain undiagnosed.
    Rates of celiac disease were 0.4% in South America, 0.5% in Africa and North America, 0.6% in Asia, and 0.8% in Europe and Oceania; the prevalence was 0.6% in female vs 0.4% males. Celiac disease was significantly more common in children than adults.
    This systematic review and meta-analysis showed celiac disease to be reported worldwide. Blood test data shows celiac disease rate of 1.4%, while biopsy data shows 0.7%. The prevalence of celiac disease varies with sex, age, and location. 
    This review demonstrates a need for more comprehensive population-based studies of celiac disease in numerous countries.  The 1.4% rate indicates that there are 91.2 million people worldwide with celiac disease, and 3.9 million are in the U.S.A.
    Source:
    Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018 Jun;16(6):823-836.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2017.06.037.