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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/24/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What is Celiac Disease and the Gluten-Free Diet? What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    WORLDWIDE VARIATION IN THE FREQUENCY OF CELIAC DISEASE AND CHANGES OVER TIME


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 09/16/2013 - Until recently, researchers thought celiac disease was mainly a problem in Northern Europe and Australasia, and uncommon in North America and the Middle East. However, with better data, researchers now regard celiac disease to be equally common in all these places.


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    Celiac disease is still generally seen as rare in Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa, but a team of researchers wanted to get a better idea of geographical differences and time trends in the frequency of celiac disease.

    The research team included J. Y. Kang, A. H. Y. Kang, A. Green, K. A. Gwee, and K.Y. Ho. They are affiliated with the Department of Gastroenterology, St George's Hospital, London, UK, the Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine at the National University of Singapore, and with the Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at the National University Health System in Singapore.

    To get the data that would help them to compare geographical differences and time trends, the team conducted Medline and Embase searches covering a period from 1946 to 1980, using the key words: coeliac disease or celiac disease + prevalence, incidence or frequency.

    Their data showed significant differences between and within countries in the prevalence and incidence of celiac disease. For example, in all of reported English medical literature, there have been only 24 ethnic Chinese and Japanese patients with celiac disease.  Of celiac-associated HLA DQ antigens, DQ2 occurs in 5–10% of Chinese and sub-Saharan Africans, compared to 5–20% in Western Europe. DQ8 occurs in 5–10% of English, Tunisians and Iranians, but in less than 5% of Eastern Europeans, Americans and Asians.

    Rates and overall numbers of both clinically and serologically diagnosed celiac disease have risen in recent years. Celiac disease is increasing in frequency, with significant geographical differences.

    The team's geographical and temporal differences seem genuine, but a large number of hypothesis and lack of diagnostic facilities have made it difficult to reach any solid conclusions.

    Although few cases have been found in Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa, there is a significant prevalence of HLA DQ2 and wheat consumption is about the same as in Western Europe.

    It is possible that celiac disease may become more common in these countries in the future.

    Source:


    Image Caption: Photo: CC--Raymond June
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    admin
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    Tammy Rhodes
    Celiac.com 04/24/2018 - Did you know in 2017 alone, the United States had OVER TENS OF THOUSANDS of people evacuate their homes due to natural disasters such as fires, floods, hurricanes, tornadoes and tsunamis? Most evacuation sites are not equipped to feed your family the safe gluten free foods that are required to stay healthy.  Are you prepared in case of an emergency? Do you have your Gluten Free Emergency Food Bag ready to grab and go?  
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    Jefferson Adams
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    J Clin Gastroenterol. 2018 Mar 1. doi: 10.1097/MCG.0000000000001018.

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    Source:
    fdfworld.com

    Jefferson Adams
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    Source:
    PLoS One. 2018; 13(3): e0193764. doi: & 10.1371/journal.pone.0193764