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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams
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    Are Canadians on the Warpath Against European Gluten-Free Beer Standards?

      Are Canadians starting a gluten-free war against certain EU beers?

    Caption: Are the Canadians pushing back against EU standards for gluten-free beer? Photo: CC--Estrella Damm

    Celiac.com 06/06/2017 - Word from the Great White north is that the Saskatchewan Liquor and Gaming Authority (SLGA) is preventing the sale of Estrella Damm Daura, following a warning from the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA).

    The SLGA, according to the company's website, is "a Treasury Board Crown Corporation responsible for the distribution, control and regulation of beverage alcohol in Saskatchewan. SLGA operates 75 retail liquor stores and there are approximately 600 private liquor retailers throughout the province."

    According to statements by SLGA spokesman David Morris, the CFIA advised SLGA and other liquor jurisdictions to "put the product on hold" last month over concerns that Daura Damm was brewed with products that contain gluten. Any decision by the SLGA to discontinue sales of Damm Daura would likely impact large numbers of customers in the region. It may also impact similar products from the EU.

    Brewed in Spain by S.A. Damm, using traditional barley ingredients, Estrella Damm Daura is filtered to reduce its gluten content to levels well below the 20 ppm required for products labeled gluten-free. S.A. Damm's company website says that "All batches are analyzed and certified by the CSIC before hitting the market," and that the company guarantees Daura Damm's gluten content is three parts per million or fewer.

    EU gluten-free standards permit any finished product below 20ppm gluten content to be labeled gluten-free. Canadian standards prohibit any product made with gluten-containing source ingredients from being labeled as gluten-free. Therein lies the apparent rub. Under EU standards, Estrella Damm Daura qualifies as a gluten-free beer. Under Canadian standards, it does not.

    No word yet on whether Canadian trade agreements make exceptions for EU products, such as beer.

    Meanwhile, potential beneficiaries are Canadian breweries, such as Rebellion Brewing Co., a Regina-based brewery that uses locally grown lentils to make its celiac-friendly Lentil Cream Ale.

    Rebellion brewmaster Mark Heise says SLGA's decision to cease ordering Estrella Damm Daura could be a "massive" opportunity. "It's huge for us," he says.

    No word yet on how far the Canadian authorities will go in their efforts to enforce their gluten-free standards against EU products, but they may have just fired the first shot. Stay tuned for more on these and other gluten-free stories as they develop.

    Read more at TheStarPhoenix.com


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    This more clearly answers a question I had about Guinness. I sent them an email inquiring if they were gluten free or not, after reading on a forum where some people are saying it is and some are saying it is not. I am new to this whole celiac thing and am learning daily. Still have a long way to go though I'm afraid.

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    Guest Maureen Sullivan

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    This sounds like the Canadian breweries are on a witch hunt to benefit their wallets. Although some Celiac people take exception to the gluten filtration process that reduces the gluten to below 20ppm, others have no issue with it and enjoy being able to drink a 'real' beer, or as close as you can come to it. Also, Estrella clearly informs the consumer of its brewing process, as do many other brewers. If you've ever tasted sorghum or lentil 'beers', you would appreciate the availability of a product like Damm Daura.

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    Gluten-reduced beers are permitted to be sold in Canada, but they can not carry a gluten-free claim and they must carry the disclaimer "This product is fermented from grains containing gluten and [processed or treated or crafted] to remove gluten. The gluten content of this product cannot be verified, and this product may contain gluten". The trigger for the removal of Damm Daura in Saskatchewn is the words "gluten free" used on the product. This beer is still available in other provinces and can be returned to the shelves in Saskatchewan once the labeling is corrected. (http://www.inspection.gc.ca/food/labelling/food-labelling-for-industry/allergens-and-gluten/eng/1388152325341/1388152326591?chap=2#s5c2)

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, and science. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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    Germans Brewing Beer with New Gluten-free Barley
    Celiac.com 07/15/2016 - Germans are particular about their beer. Since the 14th century, they have had a beer purity law, called Reinheitsgebot. That law says that beer must be made with wheat or barley, if it is to be called beer.
    That means that many gluten-free beers brewed without wheat or barley cannot be considered beer in Germany. Now, German brewers are using special "ultra-low" gluten Australian barley to brew the first gluten-free beer that conforms to the strict requirements of the law.
    The barley is called "Kebari" barley, and was developed by Csiro, an Australian government scientific research agency, which used conventional breeding to reduce the gluten levels to 10,000 times less than regular barley, which more than meets the World Health Organisation's recommendation for calling a grain gluten-free.

    German brewer Radeberger is using Kebari barley to brew a beer named Pionier, which is the first such beer to conform to the German beer purity law, Reinheitsgebot.
    Pionier beer is currently only available in Germany, where it can be legally labeled gluten-free.
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    The first gluten-free beer to meet German purity laws will be very big news among gluten-free beer lovers.
    Read more at: Foodnavigator-asia.com.

    Jefferson Adams
    Sufferfest, San Francisco's Gluten-Removed Beer of Champions
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    According to their website, "Sufferfest beer is fermented from grains containing gluten and crafted to remove gluten. Our finished beer is analyzed in a lab that uses best-in-industry R5- Gliadin ELISA assay and registers at the lowest detection limit possible, ensuring that only trace amounts of gluten are present."
    Women-owned Sufferfest currently makes an IPA called Taper, and a Pilsner called Epic.
    Learn more at Sufferfestbeer.com.

    Jefferson Adams
    Somebody Finally Tested Celiac Reactions to Gluten-free, Gluten-removed, and Regular Beers
    Celiac.com 02/28/2017 - A number of commercial brewers are opting to use enzymatic digestion, or hydrolysis, for treating gluten-containing foods and beverages to make them safe for people with gluten sensitivity, including those with celiac disease. However, some have questioned whether the process is safe for all people with celiac disease, as some celiacs complain that they experience gluten sensitivity when they drink these beers.
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    The research team included Laura K Allred;  Katherine Lesko; Diane McKiernan; Cynthia Kupper; and Stefano Guandalini. Their study used an ELISA-based method to determine whether serum antibody binding of residual peptides in a fermented barley-based product is greater among active-celiac disease patients than a normal control group, using commercial beers as a test case.
    The team first gathered sera from 31 active-celiac disease patients and 29 non-celiac control subjects, then assessed the binding of proteins from barley, rice, traditional beer, gluten-free beer, and enzymatically treated (gluten-removed) traditional beer. None of the 29 non-celiac control subjects reacted to all three barley-based samples (barley extract, traditional beer, and gluten-removed beer), while 2 of 31 active-celiac disease patients (6.4%) responded to all three samples. In the ELISA, none of the subjects' sera bound to proteins in the naturally gluten-free beer.
    Eleven active celiac patients showed immunoglobulin A (IgA) or immunoglobulin G (IgG) binding to a barley extract, compared to only one non-celiac control subject. Of the seven active celiac patients who had an IgA binding response to barley, four also responded to traditional beer, while two of these also responded to the gluten-removed beer. None of the sera from non-celiac control subjects bound to all three beer samples.
    Breaking down the results, only 11 of the 31 active celiac disease patients even reacted to barley. Only 4 of those 11 reacted to traditional beer; a mere 12%. Of those, only two celiacs reacted to gluten-removed beer, or about 6% of the test group.
    So, interestingly, while this study indicates that the vast majority of people with celiac disease seem to tolerate both traditional and gluten-free beers, it also indicates that there are residual peptides in the gluten-removed beer that may trigger reactions in a minority of celiacs.
    This particular study was small and highly regional, so very little can be projected to the larger celiac population. Clearly more study is warranted to more accurately determine the exact nature of the risk for celiacs who drink gluten-removed beer.
    This isn't the last we'll hear about the safety of gluten-removed beer. Stay tuned for more on this and other gluten-free stories.
    Read more about gluten-free and gluten-removed beers.
    Source:
    Journal of AOAC International. DOI: https://doi.org/10.5740/jaoacint.16-0184

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    Rinsing it off under running water real good, this is to get any CC off. Examples, if there is a open air bakery some flour might have settled on your produce at the grocery store. OR if they are giving out samples some person might have been handling a dounut and touched your produce. Rinsing it off under running water works to remove any trace amounts normally.

    Organic. some people in general react to stuff used in growing produce, IE glyphostphate, or like me I have a issue with the wax they coat them with to keep the fresh. Going organic or farmers market fresh helps some with these. I think your nutritionist is covering all the bases.
    Global Gluten Free Beer market report provides complete analysis with current ... Rise in Obesity, Diabetes, Celiac Disease, Other Diagnosed Food ... View the full article
    Thank you GFinDC. Question. When you say, "quick rinse", can you define what is safe for us to use when washing our fruits and veggies? I know that might sound like something I should know but I am seriously taking no chances (at least not on purpose). I've been buying organic produce because I was told I needed to. Do you find that to be true or do I need to find a new nutritionist? 😉
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