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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/24/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What is Celiac Disease and the Gluten-Free Diet? What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    ARE CELEBRITIES PUTTING TOO MUCH GLAMOR ON GLUTEN-FREE DIET?


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 10/29/2010 - From Elisabeth Hasselbeck's popular book, The gluten-free Diet, to Chelsea Clinton's gluten-free wedding cake to Gwyneth Paltrow's website praises, the focus these days seems to be on gluten, or, rather, on going gluten-free.


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    Gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley, is fast becoming like high-fructose corn syrup, or rBGH, products whose name gets mentioned only to tell people it's not an ingredient in what they are about to eat or drink.

    More and more, people mention gluten to say that they do not eat it, and to talk about the lengths they go to exclude it from their diet. Even the new Old Spice guy avoids the ubiquitous protein to help stay buff, he told Jay Leno on a recent television appearance.

    In some ways, going gluten-free is the latest twist on the low-carb diet fad of the late nineties. In some cases, the gluten-free diet, which is a must for people with celiac disease or gluten-intolerance, is just the latest diet to be chatted up on daytime talk shows, promoted by beautiful celebrities, and tried by multitudes.

    For the benefit of people with celiac disease and gluten-intolerance, the number of gluten-free products on grocery shelves has exploded over the last five years. Once scarce or nonexistent, products like gluten-free pasta, pizza, cookies, crackers, cereal and, yes, even beer have opened up a whole new range of dietary possibilities for celiacs and non-celiacs alike.

    Still, some are concerned that many who do not need, and will not benefit from a gluten-free diet may be setting themselves up for just the latest dietary failure.

    As with regular people, so with celebrities. For people with celiac disease and gluten-intolerance, a gluten-free diet and a gluten-free life are both necessary and beneficial, helping these people to stabilize their immune systems and to avoid associated disorders.

    So, while celebrities with celiac disease or gluten-intolerance require and benefit from a gluten-free diet, everyone else does not require it, and will gain questionable benefits from adopting the diet. The gluten-free diet is not a way for people without celiac disease and gluten-intolerance to automatically lose weight. That's in part because many gluten-free products are no healthier than their gluten-free counterparts. A cheese-doodle is pretty much a cheese-doodle, whether it contains wheat or not.

    For people without celiac disease or gluten-sensitivity, eating wholesome breads or pastas that contain gluten is not only delicious, but part of a healthy, balanced diet. So, after the summer buzz dies down, those folks might want to go back to their gluten.

    Not only is gluten an essential protein that gives traditional breads and pastas their flexible, chewy structure, it often is used to thicken processed foods like ketchup and ice cream.

    People who suspect that they have celiac disease or gluten intolerance should get tested, and consult a qualified medical professional. People seeking to model themselves after celebrities should look to do so in more productive ways than adopting a gluten-free diet without needing to do so. There's just no good evidence to support the idea that eating gluten-free will help people to safely lose weight.


    Image Caption: More celebrities than ever are on a gluten-free diet. Photo: Fake Hollywood sign - CC-Marcus_Vegas
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    Many studies and research has been done, that gluten is effecting everybody; some less, some more. Eventually The effect is severe in most people as age progresses. Then it is too late to switch to gluten free diet. In my humble opinion it is better to be safe, than sorry.

    It surprises me that article like this came from you, who is well respected and educated in celiac community.

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    According to Dr. Christiane Northrup, it may be that 3 out of 4 women will develop a wheat sensitivity as they hit middle age. So, reducing or eliminating wheat is probably a good thing. Also, the natural food gurus keep pushing whole wheat products incessantly, which may be triggering some intolerance and could lead to further problems down the road. Stuffing your kids with these amplified wheat products is probably predisposing them to intolerances later on. Also, over the years wheat has been modified for growing conditions - do we really know what the genetic changes have wrought?

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    Guest rick lenger

    Posted

    Gluten-free diets may not help people lose weight, but I believe everyone would benefit from a gluten-free diet. Gluten is toxic for everybody.

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    Guest Robin Bethel

    Posted

    The conclusion of this article seems to imply that you should not consider a gluten-free diet unless a doctor confirms your gluten intolerance. This contradicts much of the gluten-free community's experience--and articles on the issue--where a gluten-free diet may alleviate many people's physical symptoms, but they are not clinically diagnosed with celiac disease.

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    I think the point of the article was to the effect that "going gluten-free because a celebrity is gluten-free may be much like following a lemming over a cliff."

    there are reasons to go gluten-free -- some of which are based on confirmed celiac disease/CS diagnosis and some of which are based on one's own awareness of what one's body tells oneself.

    Another important aspect of the article is basically to know what one is consuming and to make decisions re consumption based upon valid, relevant, appropriate reasons.

    The LAST thing that those of us who NEED gluten-free products to survive (i.e., we have celiac disease/CS) and those of who WANT gluten-free products for other reasons should want to see is the gluten-free diet/lifestyle being relegated to cult or celebrity or hair-brained status.

    What if your insurance company begins to look at celiac disease/CS as being merely something you think you have in order to emulate the celebrity of the month.

    A few years back, my insurance company would not pay for osteoporosis screening (i was "TOO YOUNG" -- notwithstanding that I had shrunk from 5'5 1/2" to 5'4") UNTIL i "proved" to them that celiac disease/CS was a marker for early onset osteoporosis.

    Now I am arguing with them re othotics re the peripheral neuropothy and balance problems (see companion article re ganglionopthy!!). The Insurance company has stopped paying for othotics unless one has diabetes. If the celiac disease/CS is linked to my gait and balance problems, then the need for gluten-free products gets even more critical.

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    Sometimes having the celebrities supporting an issue it helps get it more focus. I have not been diagnosed celiac but I am definitely know that I have gluten intolerance. I don't believe the testing has been refined enough to find all cases of gluten problems. I think in time, they will develop better tests.

     

    The awareness of the problem IMO, is only helping the people that truly need it. It is helping companies and restaurants learn that it is truly a problem for many people and how to accommodate these people. I know that Outback has really gone out of their way to learn about how to prepare gluten free foods for their customers. More people and servers, know about gluten free and can help you have a good dining out experience.

     

    People will always think what they want to no matter what anyone says or does. I think the attention and focus on gluten is only helping those that really need it. Insurances are going to do whatever they want to. They really aren't there to help people, it still is business for profit.

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    Guest Scott

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    Many studies and research has been done, that gluten is effecting everybody; some less, some more. Eventually The effect is severe in most people as age progresses. Then it is too late to switch to gluten free diet. In my humble opinion it is better to be safe, than sorry.

    It surprises me that article like this came from you, who is well respected and educated in celiac community.

    What study? where was it published and by who I would love to read that considering I've never heard any doctor or anyone say that ever.

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    admin

    The Sprue-Nik Press, published by the Tri-County Celiac Sprue Support Group, a chapter of CSA/USA, Inc. serving southeastern Michigan, Volume 7, Number 5, July/August 1998. Dr. Peter Ernst is Senior Scientist at the Dept. of Pediatrics, University of Texas Medical Branch. He is the son of Canadian Celiac Association (CCA) co-founder Kay Ernst, and is a celiac himself.
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 12/01/2010 - Coeliac UK has named the winners for their 2010 Gluten-free Chef of the Year Competition.
    Two-star Michelin chef Raymond Blanc OBE FIH announced the winners for each category during a special presentation at his award winning restaurant, Le Manoir aux Quat’ Saisons in Oxfordshire.
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    Up and Coming Gluten-free Chef of the Year is Shanice Parris of Westminster Kingsway College. Runner Up is Daniel Beech, who works at the restaurant 'Simon Radley at the Chester Grosvenor'.
    See Gluten-free Chef of the Year Peter McKenzie's winning menu, Candice Webber's Runner-up menu, along with the menu for Up and Coming Gluten-free Chef of the Year, Shanice Parris
    The Gluten-free Chef of the Year competition is part of the Eating Out campaign through which looks to increase awareness of celiac disease and the gluten-free diet among chefs and catering students. 
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    Eatout Magazine

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 12/14/2012 - In the latest celebrity gluten-free news, actress and comedian Fran Drescher has joined stars like Lady Gaga and Miley Cyrus, and athletes like Novak Djokovic and Andy Murray, in adopting a gluten-free diet.
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    Read more and see the video at Examiner.com.
     

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 01/07/2013 - In a recent article for Mindbodygreen.com, James Maskell, calls celiac the "world's greatest disease."
    Why does he say this? Mainly because celiac disease cannot be cured or treated with pills or other standard methods. Because avoiding wheat, rye and barley is the only way to heal celiac-related damage to the gut, celiac disease helps drive home the importance of diet and nutrition in treating and preventing numerous other diseases.
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    In every case of celiac disease, the treatment and cure come solely from the patient taking responsibility to avoid gluten, and to eat food that promotes gut health. This reality alerts people to the fact that certain diseases can be ameliorated or even cured by lifestyle and diet changes.
    That is why Maskell calls celiac disease the greatest disease in the world.
    Forgetting for a moment the more extreme cases, and the benefits of some conventional treatments, think of how different treatments for other diseases might be if a change of diet was the only option.
    Imagine if dietary change was the only viable option for diet-related heart disease. How many people might nip it in its infancy and reverse or control their heart disease before it ever became severe enough to require drugs or surgery?
    Think how different the food landscape in America would be if doctors told patients with diet-related heart disease and diet-related pre-diabetes that a change of diet was the only option.
    When doctors have to tell patients that the only solution to their disease is a dietary shift, the doors open for "awareness of integrative or functional approaches to health."
    Given that many of the growing health epidemics (obesity, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, etc.) in America have strong dietary components, will celiac disease promote a greater awareness and stronger reliance on the role of diet in treating disease? We can only watch and hope. And, according to Maskell, if we are one of the several million Americans with celiac disease, we can count our blessings.
    Do you have celiac disease? Do you agree with John Maskell's view? What has celiac disease taught you about the relationship between diet and good health?
    Source:
    Mindbodygreen.com

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/26/2018 - Emily Dickson is one of Canada’s top athletes. As a world-class competitor in the biathlon, the event that combines cross-country skiing with shooting marksmanship, Emily Dickson was familiar with a demanding routine of training and competition. After discovering she had celiac disease, Dickson is using her diagnosis and gluten-free diet a fuel to help her get her mojo back.
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    Tammy Rhodes
    Celiac.com 04/24/2018 - Did you know in 2017 alone, the United States had OVER TENS OF THOUSANDS of people evacuate their homes due to natural disasters such as fires, floods, hurricanes, tornadoes and tsunamis? Most evacuation sites are not equipped to feed your family the safe gluten free foods that are required to stay healthy.  Are you prepared in case of an emergency? Do you have your Gluten Free Emergency Food Bag ready to grab and go?  
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    You can find my Gluten Free Emergency Food Bags and other useful products at www.allergynavigator.com.  

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/23/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to learn whether celiac disease patients commonly suffer cognitive impairment at the time they are diagnosed, and to compare their cognitive performance with non-celiac subjects with similar chronic symptoms and to a group of healthy control subjects.
    The research team included G Longarini, P Richly, MP Temprano, AF Costa, H Vázquez, ML Moreno, S Niveloni, P López, E Smecuol, R Mazure, A González, E Mauriño, and JC Bai. They are variously associated with the Small Bowel Section, Department of Medicine, Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo Gastroenterology Hospital; Neurocience Cognitive and Traslational Institute (INECO), Favaloro Fundation, CONICET, Buenos Aires; the Brain Health Center (CESAL), Quilmes, Argentina; the Research Council, MSAL, CABA; and with the Research Institute, School of Medicine, Universidad del Salvador.
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    Celiac disease patients had similar cognitive performance and anxiety, but no significant differences in depression scores compared with disease controls.
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    From their data, the team noted that any abnormal cognitive functions they saw in adults with newly diagnosed celiac disease did not seem not to be a result of the disease itself. 
    Their results indicate that cognitive dysfunction in celiac patients could be related to long-term symptoms from chronic disease, in general.
    Source:
    J Clin Gastroenterol. 2018 Mar 1. doi: 10.1097/MCG.0000000000001018.

    Connie Sarros
    Celiac.com 04/21/2018 - Dear Friends and Readers,
    I have been writing articles for Scott Adams since the 2002 Summer Issue of the Scott-Free Press. The Scott-Free Press evolved into the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. I felt honored when Scott asked me ten years ago to contribute to his quarterly journal and it's been a privilege to write articles for his publication ever since.
    Due to personal health reasons and restrictions, I find that I need to retire. My husband and I can no longer travel the country speaking at conferences and to support groups (which we dearly loved to do) nor can I commit to writing more books, articles, or menus. Consequently, I will no longer be contributing articles to the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. 
    My following books will still be available at Amazon.com:
    Gluten-free Cooking for Dummies Student's Vegetarian Cookbook for Dummies Wheat-free Gluten-free Dessert Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Reduced Calorie Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Cookbook for Kids and Busy Adults (revised version) My first book was published in 1996. My journey since then has been incredible. I have met so many in the celiac community and I feel blessed to be able to call you friends. Many of you have told me that I helped to change your life – let me assure you that your kind words, your phone calls, your thoughtful notes, and your feedback throughout the years have had a vital impact on my life, too. Thank you for all of your support through these years.