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    Be An Informant and Help Us Spread the Word!


    Yvonne (Vonnie) Mostat

    Celiac.com 05/26/2015 - This may be the last week of Celiac Awareness Month, but you can still help us! This year I hope literature got to you soon enough to get you "on board" informing people about what celiac disease is and just what gluten intolerance is. For years many people reported having celiac-like symptoms—abdominal pain, fatigue, foggy mind, joint pain, tingling of the extremities, even depression, but repeatedly tested negative for celiac disease, and yet responded positively to the gluten free diet.


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    Photo: CC--Scott MaxwellSo many people are still unaware of what celiac disease is, what a celiac can and cannot eat, and what
    signs to look for in their own bodies regarding celiac disease. The Celiac Awareness Month campaign runs right through until May 31st, and YOU can help inform people about gluten sensitivity and celiac disease. It is also a time for you to reach out to other people in the celiac community, share your recipes and what you have learned living the celiac life.

    ONE IDEA: Approach your local bakeries and restaurants. Ask at the bakeries whether they carry gluten-free foods. If they look confused, explain celiac disease to them and how difficult it often is to get really safe gluten-free food. If they point to items that they have that are gluten free, and not wrapped up or kept separate, explain nicely about cross-contamination and how strict you need to be with your diet.

    If you have Dermatitis Herpetiformis, which also requires a totally gluten-free diet, and is often thought to be stress-related, and the bakery assistant appears to be interested and has the time to listen, tell them how you suffer when an outbreak occurs. If you are gluten sensitive you can explain how gluten sensitive does not necessarily mean you have celiac disease, (between one and three percent of the population may be gluten sensitive according to the University of Chicago's Celiac Disease Center).

    If you are gluten sensitive it makes sense to avoid ingesting gluten as much as possible. If you continue eating something that makes you sick, bloated, and all the other symptoms that go along with gluten sensitivity do not continue challenging your body with something that makes you feel unwell why keep challenging your body? Again, according to the Chicago Celiac Disease Center, you are on a crash course for full blown celiac disease.

    My husband and I have had "Fun" this month going to stores and asking where their gluten-free foods are. Often they are mixed up with other foods such as a gluten-free cereal with all the other cereals. But many times these same stores have a specialty aisle devoted to the diabetic, those with celiac disease and those on special diets, such as "Heart Healthy" foods for the person with high cholesterol, or "low salt" foods for those with high blood pressure.

    We went to Granville Island in Vancouver last week. This is a big market with numerous bakeries. Many said they had gluten-free cookies, or breads but they were sold out by noon. My husband smiles charmingly and says, "I think that indicates you need to make more gluten-free foods. Celiac disease is becoming extremely common. My husband, who is not the celiac, even had the nerve to ask a young woman if she knew what foods a celiac could not eat; (he has quite the nerve). She listed flour, but also said potatoes!

    For us the most exciting thing to occur this month was something we were able to do ourselves. I wrote to the two Langley free newspapers, the Langley Times and the Langley Advance, and mentioned that May was Celiac Awareness Month in the United States and Canada and would they accept an article from me listing just what celiac disease and gluten sensitivity was and how they could inform the public. I received positive results and was very excited. I was able to give them the statistics regarding how long it takes for a celiac to be diagnosed, how some physicians are not even aware of all the symptoms, and how they differ from person to person. I was able to give them the statistics from 2010, and how the auto immune disease has increased yearly in the United States and Canada. Listing the local chapter and the U.S. and Canadian Celiac Associations web pages I crossed my fingers and hoped that at least most of the information would get into the local newspapers.

    It was a triumph when it appeared, and managing to switch the wording around from paper to paper they left out little. YOU CAN DO IT TOO. You may be too late for this year, but maybe not. You can STILL write to your local paper and tell them that this year has been the best advertised and informed year for celiac disease and the gluten sensitive, and next year you hope to do even better.

    It is when Fox News and U.S. news get involved in mentioning that May is Celiac Awareness Month that you feel we have arrived, (or almost). After contacting the main grocery stores in the lower mainland it almost made me quite teary to find inserts sheets in some of the grocery sales fliers listing their sales on gluten-free products. Wow! The bread is so expensive and to receive coupons with even .75 cents off, or $1.00 off is like gold to us! Progress is going into the Safeway bakery and see their frozen food section (fully expecting to find frosted bread and some muffins), and find that they have decorated cakes, cheesecakes and these fancy little decorated cupcakes all certified gluten-free. I was like a child in a candy shop. My husband did slow me down a little, and he did ask if they had considered the icing sugar and the decorations and whether they were also gluten-free.

    CHALLENGE YOURSELF until the end of this month. Every time you go grocery shopping ask the bakery assistants for the gluten-free section, and be sure to look very disappointed when you find out they do not carry any gluten-free foods. It does not happen as often now because we are learning, just like the peanut allergy people have had to do—we also need to eat and not get sick.

    AND we need to unite and fight for the right to be able to trust the gluten-free foods without getting out our magnifying glass and reading every label and box.

    I did mention the certification logo we have for guaranteed gluten-free, the two wheat sheaves crossed, and hope next year to be even bolder, contacting the Vancouver Chapter, the Victoria Chapter, Washington Chapter at the beginning of April to see if we can unite and advertise to a broader section of local communities this under-diagnosed, under-recognized auto-immune disorder.

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    Guest Brenda Bentley

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    I loved this article because so many times when I say I have celiac disease people are so vague about what it is. It is a totally different way of eating but it is possible. This article announces that it is important for us to eat gluten free and with so many bakeries and stores now carrying gluten free products it's nice to have a choice to choose from.

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  • About Me

    I am a freelance journalist. I am a retired registered nurse. I write regularly for the Celiac Journal of Gluten Sensitivity which publishes in the United States and British Columbia. I write under Dr. Ron Hoggan out of Victoria. I write for several secular magazines, and also five or six religious magazines, both Protestant and Catholic. Since retiring as a nurse, journalism, my second major in University, has been a life saver for me, both my poetry and articles. My husband and I recently arrived home from an all inclusive holiday to the Mayan Riviera, The Grand Sirenis Mayan. The Assistant Manager was unaware of celiac disease, but he was very interested in learning about it. I had my "Safe" and "Sorry" list translated into Spanish before we left home and several sheets of information laminated. I was so impressed at how they handled my meals I wanted to write about it. My Gluten Free Canada FREE Magazine.

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  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/02/2009 - Jesse James, the low-key celebrity biker and husband of star Sondra Bullock, led a gluten-free rally to survive yet another Donald Trump challenge on the Celebrity Apprentice recently.
    The second task of the night on the April 19th show was to devise a new dish along with a marketing campaign for the Schwan's frozen food LiveSmart line. Facing possible elimination of a team-member, the team led by Jesse James rallied with a gluten free noodle dish to stay alive for the May 10th final.
    The challenge to create and market Schwan's new dish saw Jesse James running the show at Athena. Jesse chose to keep teammate Melissa with him and put colleagues Brande and Annie to work in the kitchen. Jesse led the charge with a with the turkey meatball and gluten-free pasta suggested by team member and poker champ Annie Duke, leaving himself just enough room to put it on her had it failed.
    The meal features meatballs made with ground turkey breast meat and a touch of pork, and seasoned with onion, mushroom, garlic, spinach, basil. The meatballs are served up on a bed of Quinoa rotelle pasta and topped with a classic tomato basil sauce. A serving of tender 100% Grade A broccoli completes the meal.
    Now, Jesse's reticence regarding marketing nearly saw the team's effort fail, but the meal was solid and the execution went well. So when it came time to make a cut, Trump looked to the opposition's Herschel Walker, who had twice failed in his managerial duties.
    Check out the gluten-free Triple Play Turkey Meatballs and Pasta Dinner featured on the Celebrity Apprentice.
    Sources:

    Schwan's Examiner.com Zap2it Popwatch

    Dr. Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.
    Below is Ron Hoggan's reply the editor of the Montreal Gazette regarding the article: "Is gluten really something that most people should avoid?"
    Dear Health Editor:
    Mr. Dunning represents corn as a choice for bread-making prior to the advent of wheat, rye, and barley cultivation. However, the evidence suggests that corn was not yet available 10 to 15 thousand years ago when wheat, the earliest of these three grains, was first cultivated so it wasn’t available more than 20 thousand years ago when wild barley was first exploited ( 1 ). The evidence also indicates that corn was not available in the Near East, where wheat was first cultivated, as corn was a New World food developed by Mesoamerican indigenous peoples ( 2 ) half a world away.  In short, corn was not a discarded option for bread making when and where gluten grains were first cultivated.
    Perhaps Mr. Dunning should be forgiven such a relatively minor mistake. After all, he is a journalist, not a cereal scientist. However, as he is identified, in the article in question, as a science writer and a critical analyst, that should set the bar a little higher. Surely we may expect him to conduct basic research in an area by at least glancing at some of the peer reviewed reports on this topic. The one time he does this, he harkens to a report on autism as a tool for arguing against the connection between ADHD and gluten*.  For instance, he decries the adoption of a gluten free diet by those without celiac disease, gluten induced neuropathy, or wheat allergy.  Yet more than 90% of those with celiac disease currently go undiagnosed in the USA (3) and the average delay between onset of symptoms and diagnosis is 11 years (4). Here in Canada, we have very long delays before most of us can get to see a gastroenterologist, so our delays to diagnosis may be even longer.  This suggests that our rates of diagnosis are even lower than those of the USA. Perhaps Mr. Dunning’s querulous rhetoric could be more constructively directed at these long delays and the alarming rates of under-diagnosis of celiac disease. 
    In the interim, it seems very sensible for those with undiagnosed celiac disease to follow a gluten free diet and experience the improved health and quality of life which Mr. Dunning admits are available to these individuals through a gluten free diet.  This is an issue that might be revisited when our health care system is providing a timely diagnosis to at least a majority of cases of celiac disease.
    Recent research has also shown that those with non-celiac gluten sensitivity, which afflicts about 12% of the general population ( 5), experience even higher rates of morbidity and early mortality than those with celiac disease (6 ). Yet this group is either entirely ignored in Mr. Dunning’s  article, or, more likely, it is the unstated focus of his attack.
    Mr. Dunning also seems to be unaware that humans lack the full compliment of enzymes necessary for full digestion of gluten proteins thus making many of the constituent amino acids beyond our ability to metabolize when he states that gluten is “a protein that your body uses.” He further asserts that there is no good reason to avoid gluten if one does not have one of the three conditions he lists. Yet my own work suggests that the morphine-like opioids derived from gluten grains may be a contributing factor in several types of malignancy ( 7).    
    I was pleased to read that Mr. Dunning had at least glanced at data on gluten sensitive idiopathic neuropathy, but chagrined to read his speculation regarding the prevalence of this condition. I have devoted many years to the study of gluten’s impact on human health and have yet to read any work suggesting its prevalence. Perhaps Mr. Dunning could at least hint at his source when making such contentious claims.
    Nonetheless, there is clear evidence that a majority of those who experience gluten sensitive idiopathic neuropathy (5) do so in the presence of non-celiac gluten sensitivity, an autoimmune dynamic. Closer to home, our own Scott Frazer has demonstrated that consumption of gluten proteins is a potent force behind the development of many cases of type 1 diabetes (8). Reports of the causal connection between gluten consumption and autoimmune disease abound in the peer reviewed literature and are too numerous to warrant citing.
    Mr. Dunning also asserts “there is no evidence that incidence of disease increased worldwide once wheat became a staple.”  The field of Archaeology differs dramatically with Mr. Dunning’s claim. In general, it is quite well established that pre-agricultural, hunter-gatherers were much taller and had stronger bones than their descendants who adopted agriculture (9). For instance, a common finding in the skeletal remains of early farmers is a condition of porotic hyperostosis (10).
    Mr. Dunning also seems to be unaware that fats, per gram, provide more than twice the energy available in either carbohydrates or proteins and this ignores the added weight of indigestible fibre. The increased caloric density of fats is a principle that most students learn in high school Biology classes. Yet Mr. Dunning asserts that bread was a source of high energy and light weight.
    While science requires scepticism and criticism to function, polemic rhetoric based on personal bias generates more heat than light.  Mr. Dunning’s report is rife with errors and emotion. Publication of such dogma does little to enhance either the Gazette’s or Mr. Dunning’s credibility. Newspapers are given considerable credence as many readers, myself included, assume that journalists are exercising due diligence in checking their facts prior to publication of these reports. It is only when I read an article such as this one, that is deeply flawed and falls within my area of expertise, that my faith in journalists and the media is undermined.  
    *note: The only report I could find that fits the meagre description provided by Mr. Dunning is one that involved 15 children who were studied over a 12 week period (11). If this is, indeed, the study Mr. Dunning referred to, it hardly provides conclusive evidence of anything beyond the obvious need for more comprehensive study in this area. His use of these data as a springboard for his absolutist claims seems highly questionable, to say the least.
    Sincerely,
    Ron Hoggan, Ed. D.
    Royal Roads University, Continuing Studies
    co-author: Dangerous Grains ISBN: 978158333-129-3 www.dangerousgrains.com
    editor: Journal of Gluten Sensitivity www.celiac.com     
    editor/co-author: Cereal Killers  http://tiny.cc/s7neg
    Sources:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheat http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maize     Fasano A, Berti I, Gerarduzzi T, Not T, Colletti RB, Drago S, Elitsur Y, Green PH, Guandalini S, Hill ID, Pietzak M, Ventura A, Thorpe M, Kryszak D, Fornaroli F, Wasserman SS, Murray JA, Horvath K. Prevalence of celiac disease in at-risk and not-at-risk groups in the United States: a large multicenter study. Arch Intern Med. 2003 Feb 10;163(3):286-92 Green PHR, Stavropoulos SN, Panagi SG, Goldstein SL, Mcmahon DJ, Absan H, Neugut AI. Am J Gastroenterol. 2001 Jan;96(1):126-31 Hadjivassiliou M, Gibson A, Davies-Jones GA, Lobo AJ, Stephenson TJ, Milford-Ward A. Does cryptic gluten sensitivity play a part in neurological illness? Lancet. 1996 Feb 10;347(8998):369-71. Anderson LA, McMillan SA, Watson RG, Monaghan P, Gavin AT, Fox C, Murray LJ. Malignancy and mortality in a population-based cohort of patients with celiac disease or "gluten sensitivity". World J Gastroenterol. 2007 Jan 7;13(1):146-51. Hoggan R. Considering wheat, rye, and barley proteins as aids to carcinogens. Med Hypotheses. 1997 Sep;49(3):285-8. http://www.ohri.ca/profiles/scott.asp Lutz W. [The carbohydrate theory]. Wien Med Wochenschr. 1994;144(16):387-92. Wright L, Chew F, Porotic Hyperostosis and Paleoepidemiology: A Forensic Perspective on Anemia among the Ancient Maya. Am Anthro. 1998 Dec; 100: 924-939. Elder JH, Shankar M, Shuster J, Theriaque D, Burns S, Sherrill L.    The gluten-free, casein-free diet in autism: results of a preliminary double blind clinical trial. J Autism Dev Disord. 2006 Apr;36(3):413-20.

    Kenneth Fine, MD
    Organizations that embrace the Goodness of service, the Intelligence of scientific know-how, the Excitement of new discovery, and the Truth in what they say and do maintain a lasting place in this world. I am therefore privileged to announce that on April 1st, 2011 EnteroLab.com and my non-profit Intestinal Health Institute celebrated our 11th Anniversary.  It was in April 2000 that my formal academic medical career officially took on a full-time Public Health Service mission that continues to exist and work today “For Your Health, Happiness, and Hope.” EnteroLab.com, the world’s first online intestinal health clinical laboratory, was the offspring of my previous 11 years of academic research at Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas (1989-2000). During the 1990’s, my formal research studies of intestinal physiology, celiac disease, and microscopic colitis gave way to a new understanding of Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity and how it adversely affects the health of many millions of both symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals. Since starting EnteroLab.com in 2000, our understanding and experience of this field has continued to expand, as we more fully appreciate what now appears to be a raging epidemic of gluten sensitivity.
    Because the constant of my academic medical profession has been that as an educator, and the main Mission of the Intestinal Health Institute is one of public health education, we are holding a weekend health conference in Dallas, Texas on November 3-6, 2011 at the Westin Galleria. This conference is called “The Gluten Truth meets The Circle of Life: A Tale of Two Hemispheres” (see http://GlutenTruth.org for full conference itinerary, a brochure, and registration instructions).  This conference will help explain how and why most people affected by gluten today do not have celiac disease, what we can do about these health ailments, and how to optimize a gluten-free diet and our overall health pursuits for optimal health outcomes. The price to attend this 3.5-day conference is an astoundingly low $269 which covers all lectures, entertainment events and gluten-free conference meals. We are also offering a buddy special: bring one or more people with you to the conference and you both/all save 10% on conference admission.
    The conference will feature a keynote address by my former mentor and world famous gastrointestinal researcher Dr. John Fordtran, whose original discovery of microscopic colitis (which affects 5% of celiacs), and whose assignment to me in 1989 to follow a path of research on that disease, eventually led to my discovery in 1999 of non-celiac gluten sensitivity as an important cause of multifaceted illness, as well as how to diagnose it using stool testing. Dr. Fordtran and I, in back-to-back lectures, will re-trace this interesting chronological path – beginning with a historical account by Dr. Fordtran of the events leading up to and following his original discovery and description of microscopic colitis in 1979, and ending with the account of my research discovering how celiac disease and microscopic colitis were inter-related, which, in turn, unlocked the mechanism of how gluten induces illness in so many non-celiac patients/people.
    The conference will also feature an unprecedented historic account of how, in 1950, Willem Karel Dicke, MD, PhD, a Dutch Pediatrician, discovered how gluten was the cause of celiac disease; this account at our conference will be given by none other than his son Dr. Karel Dicke, a distinguished physician in the Dallas metroplex. Furthermore, Dr. Willem Dicke's celiac researching successors from The Netherlands, Drs. Chris Mulder and Gerd Bouma will be speaking and enlightening us with their extensive experience with celiac disease, non-celiac gluten sensitivity, microscopic colitis, refractory sprue, and preservation of Dr. Dicke's legacy in Holland. We are also pleased to have Alice Bast, the founder and Director of the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness present her experience on how her celiac disease turned into a life of award-winning public service, a presentation that will serve to ignite your own passion and purpose… not only for your own health, but for the health of society at large. And finally, an incredible person and practitioner, Dr. Gary Berman will enlighten you with a unique account of how you can learn to tap into your own intuition and higher self to pave the way for a more successful, healthful life.
    I will also be giving lectures relating to the namesake of the conference: “The Gluten Truth” and “The Circle of Life”, and our Nurse-Clinical Manager, Phyllis Zermeno, BSN, and the head of our Research and Development Laboratory, Dr. Frederick Ogunji (both officers in our nonprofit organization) will be relating their unique experiences in their important roles in the organizations, as well as hosting a Health Professionals Open-Mic, exposing you to additional unique professional health experience by the health professionals in attendance.
    In addition to this fantastic educational line-up, and a completely gluten-free healthful menu (with additional catering to other food sensitivity and Kosher-food needs), the conference will also feature some creative entertainment opportunities for both you and I. There will be a talent show on Friday November 4th, when you will have the opportunity to have the Mic and Stage for a few precious minutes to show case your talent, followed on Saturday night by a banquet dinner, celiac disease-Release Party, and Live Concert featuring me and my All-Star Rock n' Blues band, The Tennessee Texans. The title and theme of the show is “Rock n’ Blues for Goodness’ Sake.” My new celiac disease release, “Memphis Rising”, representing my 7th celiac disease release, was recorded in Memphis, TN (the birthplace of Rock and Roll and home of the Blues) with an all-Memphis musician studio line-up. My musical pursuits not only provide entertainment for the conference, but more generally, help me to be the creative, service-oriented, spiritual, and well rounded health professional I have come to be… and happier, and healthier as well. Being happier and healthier personally stimulates me to lead you to a life of the same, because the best part of Goodness is to share it and give it away! You will hear this and more in my songs at the concert, and at my lecture presentations at the conference. Please go to http://GlutenTruth.org for the full story.
    On a final note, I would like to congratulate the expert staff at Celiac.com for their understanding of The Gluten Truth, i.e., that there is more to gluten-related illness than the just the 1% of gluten-sensitive individuals affected by celiac disease. Scott Adams and this website, having served the gluten-sensitive community since 1995, deserve a standing ovation. You may stand and clap now!  Thank you.
    Read About Our New Fall Weekend Conference Entitled  “The Gluten Truth meets the Circle of Life” at http://GlutenTruth.org

    Dr. Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.
    Celiac.com 03/06/2012 - I was disappointed to read the opinion article by   Dr. Di Sabatino and Dr. Corazza  published in February 2012 by Annals of Internal Medicine (1).  The article itself is mostly  reasonable and thoughtful. However,  they implicitly assert gluten to be a healthy food by stating that they wish to prevent "a gluten preoccupation from evolving into the conviction that gluten is toxic for most of the population" (1).  In that single statement they are making dietary recommendations in the absence of evidence; the very situation they claim to want to rectify.
    Their published opinion has spawned a number of articles online and in the popular press which  seem to ignore all of the concessions to non-celiac gluten sensitivity in the source article. Some of these spin-off commentaries even use the original article to support their suggestions that a gluten free diet is inappropriate even for those with symptoms that are relieved by the diet. This definitely contravenes the opinions expressed by Di Sabatino and Corazza.  For instance, one of them states "That hasn’t stopped many people from declaring they are gluten sensitive, even though they may not be." (2)
    Please take a moment to consider this proposition. The gluten free diet is restrictive, inconvenient, and expensive. Why would anyone continue to follow such a diet without being convinced that it was valuable to them?  Di Sabatino and Corazzo freely acknowledge that there is a dearth of diagnostic tests and protocols for non-celiac gluten sensitivity.  
    Doctors  Di Sabatino and Corazza  not only acknowledge non-celiac gluten sensitivity as a cause for symptoms very similar to those of celiac disease, they  call for further research to develop and codify diagnostic protocols that will help clinicians better recognize and treat this newly recognized ailment. They go on to acknowledge that conditions including "headache, lethargy, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, ataxia, or recurrent oral ulceration" in the absence of celiac disease often improve or resolve on a gluten free diet.  Their unfortunate denial of gluten as toxic seems to have invited much of the spin-off conjecture under such titles as "Gluten-free diets not always necessary, study suggests" (3).   Even the characterization of this opinion article as a study is misleading in the extreme.       
    Di Sabatino and Corazza focus mostly on gastrointestinal symptoms when discussing non-celiac gluten sensitivity.  It is clear that their focus does not extend far beyond such symptoms. What is also clear is that many cases of non-celiac gluten sensitivity, just like celiac disease, manifest with a wide range of signs and symptoms including neurological illnesses. Dr. Marios Hadjivassiliou, chief neurologist at the Royal Hallamshire Hospital in Sheffield, U.K. has repeatedly demonstrated that a majority of his patients with neurological disease of unknown origin show evidence of gluten sensitivity, the majority of whom do not have celiac disease (4). 
    My disappointment stems not so much from doctors Di Sabatini and Corazza's article and their assertion that gluten grains are not toxic to the general population, as from the spin-off claims that the gluten free diet is being excessively followed  in the belief that it is more healthful.  A rapidly growing body of evidence is showing  that increasing numbers of ailments among increasing numbers of people are driven by this ubiquitous food.  Gluten may well be toxic for most of the population. We don't know.  We can't know that without more research. 
    The growing numbers of people who are willing to accept the inconvenience and expense of a gluten free diet because of the benefits they experience should be considered.  Gluten may be toxic to many more people than are currently identifiable by available testing. Asserting one side or the other of this argument is at least premature. At most it could prove very harmful to those individuals who listen and obey the voices of experts, even when they err and when relayed inaccurately by the media.  
    For a more detailed account of this controversy please see the spring 2012 issue of the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.
    Sources:

    Di Sabatino A, Corazza G. Nonceliac Gluten Sensitivity: Sense or Sensibility? Ann Intern Med. 2012;156:309-311. http://www.latimes.com/health/boostershots/la-heb-gluten-sensitivity-20120221,0,4517592.story http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-504763_162-57381966-10391704/gluten-free-diets-not-always-necessary-study-suggests/ Hadjivassiliou M, Gibson A, Davies-Jones GA, Lobo AJ, Stephenson TJ, Milford-Ward A. Does cryptic gluten sensitivity play a part in neurological illness? Lancet. 1996 Feb 10;347(8998):369-71.

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    Celiac.com 07/19/2018 - Maintaining a gluten-free diet can be an on-going challenge, especially when you factor in all the hidden or obscure gluten that can trip you up. In many cases, foods that are naturally gluten-free end up contain added gluten. Sometimes this can slip by us, and that when the suffering begins. To avoid suffering needlessly, be sure to keep a sharp eye on labels, and beware of added or hidden gluten, even in food labeled gluten-free.  Use Celiac.com's SAFE Gluten-Free Food List and UNSAFE Gluten-free Food List as a guide.
    Also, beware of these common mistakes that can ruin your gluten-free diet. Watch out for:
    Watch out for naturally gluten-free foods like rice and soy, that use gluten-based ingredients in processing. For example, many rice and soy beverages are made using barley enzymes, which can cause immune reactions in people with celiac disease. Be careful of bad advice from food store employees, who may be misinformed themselves. For example, many folks mistakenly believe that wheat-based grains like spelt or kamut are safe for celiacs. Be careful when taking advice. Beware of cross-contamination between food store bins selling raw flours and grains, often via the food scoops. Be careful to avoid wheat-bread crumbs in butter, jams, toaster, counter surface, etc. Watch out for hidden gluten in prescription drugs. Ask your pharmacist for help about anything you’re not sure about, or suspect might contain unwanted gluten. Watch out for hidden gluten in lotions, conditioners, shampoos, deodorants, creams and cosmetics, (primarily for those with dermatitis herpetaformis). Be mindful of stamps, envelopes or other gummed labels, as these can often contain wheat paste. Use a sponge to moisten such surfaces. Be careful about hidden gluten in toothpaste and mouthwash. Be careful about common cereal ingredients, such as malt flavoring, or other non-gluten-free ingredient. Be extra careful when considering packaged mixes and sauces, including soy sauce, fish sauce, catsup, mustard, mayonnaise, etc., as many of these can contain wheat or wheat by-product in their manufacture. Be especially careful about gravy mixes, packets & canned soups. Even some brands of rice paper can contain gluten, so be careful. Lastly, watch out for foods like ice cream and yogurt, which are often gluten-free, but can also often contain added ingredients that can make them unsuitable for anyone on a gluten-free diet. Eating Out? If you eat out, consider that many restaurants use a shared grill or shared cooking oil for regular and gluten-free foods, so be careful. Also, watch for flour in otherwise gluten-free spices, as per above. Ask questions, and stay vigilant.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/18/2018 - Despite many studies on immune development in children, there still isn’t much good data on how a mother’s diet during pregnancy and infancy influences a child’s immune development.  A team of researchers recently set out to assess whether changes in maternal or infant diet might influence the risk of allergies or autoimmune disease.
    The team included Vanessa Garcia-Larsen, Despo Ierodiakonou, Katharine Jarrold, Sergio Cunha,  Jennifer Chivinge, Zoe Robinson, Natalie Geoghegan, Alisha Ruparelia, Pooja Devani, Marialena Trivella, Jo Leonardi-Bee, and Robert J. Boyle.
    They are variously associated with the Department of Undiagnosed Celiac Disease More Common in Women and Girls International Health, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America; the Respiratory Epidemiology, Occupational Medicine and Public Health, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; the Section of Paediatrics, Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; the Centre for Statistics in Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom; the Division of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom; the Centre of Evidence Based Dermatology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom; and Stanford University in the USA.
    Team members searched MEDLINE, Excerpta Medica dataBASE (EMBASE), Web of Science, Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and Literatura Latino Americana em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS) for observational studies conducted between January 1946 and July 2013, and interventional studies conducted through December 2017, that evaluated the relationship between diet during pregnancy, lactation, or the first year of life, and future risk of allergic or autoimmune disease. 
    They then selected studies, extracted data, and assessed bias risk. They evaluated data using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE). They found 260 original studies, covering 964,143 participants, of milk feeding, including 1 intervention trial of breastfeeding promotion, and 173 original studies, covering 542,672 participants, of other maternal or infant dietary exposures, including 80 trials of 26 maternal, 32 infant, or 22 combined interventions. 
    They found a high bias risk in nearly half of the more than 250 milk feeding studies and in about one-quarter of studies of other dietary exposures. Evidence from 19 intervention trials suggests that oral supplementation with probiotics during late pregnancy and lactation may reduce risk of eczema. 44 cases per 1,000; 95% CI 20–64), and 6 trials, suggest that fish oil supplementation during pregnancy and lactation may reduce risk of allergic sensitization to egg. GRADE certainty of these findings was moderate. 
    The team found less evidence, and low GRADE certainty, for claims that breastfeeding reduces eczema risk during infancy, that longer exclusive breastfeeding is associated with reduced type 1 diabetes mellitus, and that probiotics reduce risk of infants developing allergies to cow’s milk. 
    They found no evidence that dietary exposure to other factors, including prebiotic supplements, maternal allergenic food avoidance, and vitamin, mineral, fruit, and vegetable intake, influence risk of allergic or autoimmune disease. 
    Overall, the team’s findings support a connection between the mother’s diet and risk of immune-mediated diseases in the child. Maternal probiotic and fish oil supplementation may reduce risk of eczema and allergic sensitization to food, respectively.
    Stay tuned for more on diet during pregnancy and its role in celiac disease.
    Source:
    PLoS Med. 2018 Feb; 15(2): e1002507. doi:  10.1371/journal.pmed.1002507

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/17/2018 - What can fat soluble vitamin levels in newly diagnosed children tell us about celiac disease? A team of researchers recently assessed fat soluble vitamin levels in children diagnosed with newly celiac disease to determine whether vitamin levels needed to be assessed routinely in these patients during diagnosis.
    The researchers evaluated the symptoms of celiac patients in a newly diagnosed pediatric group and evaluated their fat soluble vitamin levels and intestinal biopsies, and then compared their vitamin levels with those of a healthy control group.
    The research team included Yavuz Tokgöz, Semiha Terlemez and Aslıhan Karul. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, the Department of Pediatrics, and the Department of Biochemistry at Adnan Menderes University Medical Faculty in Aydın, Turkey.
    The team evaluated 27 female, 25 male celiac patients, and an evenly divided group of 50 healthy control subjects. Patients averaged 9 years, and weighed 16.2 kg. The most common symptom in celiac patients was growth retardation, which was seen in 61.5%, with  abdominal pain next at 51.9%, and diarrhea, seen in 11.5%. Histological examination showed nearly half of the patients at grade Marsh 3B. 
    Vitamin A and vitamin D levels for celiac patients were significantly lower than the control group. Vitamin A and vitamin D deficiencies were significantly more common compared to healthy subjects. Nearly all of the celiac patients showed vitamin D insufficiency, while nearly 62% showed vitamin D deficiency. Nearly 33% of celiac patients showed vitamin A deficiency. 
    The team saw no deficiencies in vitamin E or vitamin K1 among celiac patients. In the healthy control group, vitamin D deficiency was seen in 2 (4%) patients, vitamin D insufficiency was determined in 9 (18%) patients. The team found normal levels of all other vitamins in the healthy group.
    Children with newly diagnosed celiac disease showed significantly reduced levels of vitamin D and A. The team recommends screening of vitamin A and D levels during diagnosis of these patients.
    Source:
    BMC Pediatrics

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/16/2018 - Did weak public oversight leave Arizonans ripe for Theranos’ faulty blood tests scam? Scandal-plagued blood-testing company Theranos deceived Arizona officials and patients by selling unproven, unreliable products that produced faulty medical results, according to a new book by Wall Street Journal reporter, whose in-depth, comprehensive investigation of the company uncovered deceit, abuse, and potential fraud.
    Moreover, Arizona government officials facilitated the deception by providing weak regulatory oversight that essentially left patients as guinea pigs, said the book’s author, investigative reporter John Carreyrou. 
    In the newly released "Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup," Carreyrou documents how Theranos and its upstart founder, Elizabeth Holmes, used overblown marketing claims and questionable sales tactics to push faulty products that resulted in consistently faulty blood tests results. Flawed results included tests for celiac disease and numerous other serious, and potentially life-threatening, conditions.
    According to Carreyrou, Theranos’ lies and deceit made Arizonans into guinea pigs in what amounted to a "big, unauthorized medical experiment.” Even though founder Elizabeth Holmes and Theranos duped numerous people, including seemingly savvy investors, Carreyrou points out that there were public facts available to elected officials back then, like a complete lack of clinical data on the company's testing and no approvals from the Food and Drug Administration for any of its tests.
    SEC recently charged the now disgraced Holmes with what it called a 'years-long fraud.’ The company’s value has plummeted, and it is now nearly worthless, and facing dozens, and possibly hundreds of lawsuits from angry investors. Meantime, Theranos will pay Arizona consumers $4.65 million under a consumer-fraud settlement Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich negotiated with the embattled blood-testing company.
    Both investors and Arizona officials, “could have picked up on those things or asked more questions or kicked the tires more," Carreyrou said. Unlike other states, such as New York, Arizona lacks robust laboratory oversight that would likely have prevented Theranos from operating in those places, he added.
    Stay tuned for more new on how the Theranos fraud story plays out.
    Read more at azcentral.com.