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    Celiac Disease Awareness Campaign for Health Care Providers and Public Launched by NIH


    Scott Adams


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    Celiac.com 07/31/2006 - The National Institutes of Health (NIH) today announced the launch of a campaign to heighten awareness of celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder that interferes with the absorption of nutrients from food. The campaign stems from consensus recommendations of an independent panel of experts convened by the NIH to assess current diagnosis, treatment, and management of the disease.

    “We now know that celiac disease is more prevalent that previously thought — affecting nearly 1 percent of the U.S. population — and remains under-diagnosed,” said Griffin P. Rodgers, M.D., acting director of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), the NIH institute leading the effort. “Through the campaign, we hope to increase physician awareness of the disease, resulting in earlier diagnosis and better outcomes for celiac patients.”

    Developed by the NIDDK, with coordination among the professional and voluntary organizations working on celiac disease, the campaign offers materials and resources for health professionals and the public about the symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and management of celiac disease. The campaign offers fact sheets, booklets, practice tools for health professionals, NIH research information, and resources from professional and voluntary organizations that focus on celiac disease.

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune response to gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. Symptoms of celiac disease range from gas, diarrhea, and abdominal pain, to delayed growth, certain skin rashes, infertility, and osteoporosis. Treatment for celiac disease is adherence to a gluten-free diet.

    “One of the challenges with celiac disease is the vast array of symptoms associated with the disease,” said Stephen P. James, M.D., director of the Division of Digestive Diseases and Nutrition (DDN) at the NIDDK. “We are hoping to educate health professionals and the public that celiac disease is not only a gastrointestinal disease.”

    The NIDDK, part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), conducts and supports research on diabetes; endocrine and metabolic diseases; digestive diseases, nutrition, and obesity; and kidney, urologic and hematologic diseases. Spanning the full spectrum of medicine and afflicting people of all ages and ethnic groups, these diseases encompass some of the most common, severe, and disabling conditions affecting Americans.

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) — The Nations Medical Research Agency — includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. It is the primary federal agency for conducting and supporting basic, clinical and translational medical research, and it investigates the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases.

    CONTACT:
    Melissa McGowan
    301-496-3583

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  • About Me

    In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease. In 1998 I founded The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore!, and I am the co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

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    Scott Adams
    Celiac.com 03/30/2005 - The original one-stop shop on the Internet for wheat and gluten-free foods has underwritten a new Public Radio program on celiac disease called Gut Reaction. The one-hour program was produced by Richard L. Paul of rlpaulproductions, LLC, many Public Radio stations across the USA have already aired it, including WAMU in Washington, DC, WILL-FM in Champaign/Urbana, IL, WBE in Chicago, IL, WCPN-FM in Cleveland, OH, seventeen stations on the Minnesota Public Radio Network, and it is scheduled to air on many more stations in the future--including next weekend on WFUV in New York City. Several stations who aired it got such an overwhelmingly positive listener response that they have decided to air it multiple times.
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    Mr. Adams emphasizes that: We believe that Public Radio is the perfect vehicle to deliver this important message about celiac disease to people across the USA, because its function is public service and education via quality, educational programming--and Gut Reaction is just that. He continues: You can help us to get Gut Reaction aired in your community by going to Celiac.com and following the steps listed there to contact the programming director at your local Public Radio station. He explained that Public Radio programming is decided on a station by station basis, and each stations program director decides which shows get aired on their station--so each person who contacts them can have a huge influence on which programs get chosen.
    About The Gluten-Free Mall®, Your Special Diet Superstore®:
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    Wendy Cohan
    Celiac.com 02/21/2011 - After reading this new book by celiac nurse specialist Shelly Stuart, RN, what shines through above all is her true understanding of the complex nature of gluten-related illnesses, and her heartfelt compassion for patients who suffer from them. Her book is extremely well researched and documented. As a registered nurse and celiac herself,  Ms. Stuart is able to use her strong patient teaching experience to clearly educate the reader about even very complicated subjects. She provides excellent explanations of leaky gut and the pathophysiology of celiac disease, and she is one of the first clinicians to write in-depth about non-celiac gluten intolerance.  Importantly, she makes the point that immune mediated reactions can and do occur in non-celiac gluten intolerance, and backs this up by citing clinical evidence. Another important point made concerns pancreatic insufficiency, which can accompany celiac disease, but few know that this condition can persist even after diagnosis and transition to a gluten-free diet. Her discussion of the many, varied health disorders associated with celiac disease is very comprehensive.
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/29/2012 - Gluten-free confections created by a baker from Lake Oswego, Oregon, topped the competition on the latest installment of the Food Network's "Cupcake Wars."
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    No stranger to the competition, Bussanich finished as first runner-up on the program last year. That was good enough to earn her place as one of four pastry chefs invited back to the televised cupcake competition.
    Bussanich, is the first gluten-free baker to win the show's top spot, producers told her. She is also the only Pacific Northwest resident to win the competition.
    The show's theme celebrated the 100th Episode of the TNT television series, "The Closer," starring Kyra Sedgwick. Bussanich responded with intricately decorated, coffee and doughnut-themed cupcakes to honor the cop drama.
    As a part of her $10,000 prize, Bussanich and her assistant Jackie Eizik, catered a party for Sedgwick and other cast and crew from "The Closer." Bussanich says that her victory in "Cupcake Wars" provides a stage not only for her online shop, but for gluten-free foods in general. She herself doesn't tolerate the wheat and other proteins so central to most baked goods, she rejects the idea that being gluten-free means eating blandly. "Gluten-free can be divine," she says.
    "Cupcake Wars" will appear in the coming weeks on the Food Network.
    Read: Kyra Bussanich's winning recipe for Boston Cream Pie cupcakes from Food Network's The Closer 100th Episode.
    Source:

    http://www.oregonlive.com/lake-oswego/index.ssf/2011/12/lake_oswego_baker_wins_food_ne.html

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/28/2014 - Did John F. Kennedy suffer from symptoms of undiagnosed celiac disease? Celiac disease expert Dr. Peter H. R. Green says Kennedy's known symptoms and family history make it likely that America's 35th president did in fact have celiac disease, which remained undetected in his lifetime.
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    He writes that: “John F. Kennedy’s long-standing medical problems started in childhood. In Kennedy’s adolescence, gastrointestinal symptoms, weight and growth problems as well as fatigue were described. Later in life, he suffered from abdominal pain, diarrhea, weight loss, osteoporosis, migraine and Addison’s disease. Chronic back problems, due to osteoporosis, resulted in several operations and required medications for chronic pain."
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    Source:
    Irishcentral.com.

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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/21/2018 - Would you buy a house advertised as ‘gluten-free’? Yes, there really is such a house for sale. 
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    Read more at Arizonafamily.com.

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    Bakery On Main started in the small bakery of a natural foods market on Main Street in Glastonbury, Connecticut. Founder Michael Smulders listened when his customers with Celiac Disease would mention the lack of good tasting, gluten-free options available to them. Upon learning this, he believed that nobody should have to suffer due to any kind of food allergy or dietary need. From then on, his mission became creating delicious and fearlessly unique gluten-free products that were clean and great tasting, while still being safe for his Celiac customers!
    Premium ingredients, bakeshop delicious recipes, and happy customers were our inspiration from the beginning— and are still the cornerstones of Bakery On Main today. We are a fiercely ethical company that believes in integrity and feels that happiness and wholesome, great tasting food should be harmonious. We strive for that in everything we bake in our dedicated gluten-free facility that is GFCO Certified and SQF Level 3 Certified. We use only natural, NON-GMO Project Verified ingredients and all of our products are certified Kosher Parve, dairy and casein free, and we have recently introduced certified Organic items as well! 
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/19/2018 - Could baking soda help reduce the inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease? Scientists at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University say that a daily dose of baking soda may in fact help reduce inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease.
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    In patients who drank water with baking soda for two weeks, immune cells called macrophages, shifted from primarily those that promote inflammation, called M1, to those that reduce it, called M2. "The shift from inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory profile is happening everywhere," O'Connor says. "We saw it in the kidneys, we saw it in the spleen, now we see it in the peripheral blood."
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    The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health.
    Read more at: Sciencedaily.com

    Jefferson Adams
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    The research team included P Singh, A Arora, TA Strand, DA Leffler, C Catassi, PH Green, CP Kelly, V Ahuja, and GK Makharia. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Lady Hardinge Medical College, New Delhi, India; Innlandet Hospital Trust, Lillehammer, Norway; Centre for International Health, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Gastroenterology Research and Development, Takeda Pharmaceuticals Inc, Cambridge, MA; Department of Pediatrics, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy; Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; USA Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; and the Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.
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    This systematic review and meta-analysis showed celiac disease to be reported worldwide. Blood test data shows celiac disease rate of 1.4%, while biopsy data shows 0.7%. The prevalence of celiac disease varies with sex, age, and location. 
    This review demonstrates a need for more comprehensive population-based studies of celiac disease in numerous countries.  The 1.4% rate indicates that there are 91.2 million people worldwide with celiac disease, and 3.9 million are in the U.S.A.
    Source:
    Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018 Jun;16(6):823-836.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2017.06.037.