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    Celiac Disease Diagnosis Fuels Biathlete’s Battle Back to the Top


    Jefferson Adams
    • Celiac disease was holding back world class biathlete Emily Dickson. Her diagnosis and gluten-free diet are helping her get her mojo back.

    Celiac Disease Diagnosis Fuels Biathlete’s Battle Back to the Top
    Image Caption: Image: CC--Guillaume Baviere

    Celiac.com 04/26/2018 - Emily Dickson is one of Canada’s top athletes. As a world-class competitor in the biathlon, the event that combines cross-country skiing with shooting marksmanship, Emily Dickson was familiar with a demanding routine of training and competition. After discovering she had celiac disease, Dickson is using her diagnosis and gluten-free diet a fuel to help her get her mojo back.

    Just a few years ago, Dickson dominated her peers nationally and won a gold medal at Canada Games for both pursuit and team relay. She also won silver in the sprint and bronze in the individual race. But just as she was set to reach her peak, Dickson found herself in an agonizing battle. She was suffering a mysterious loss of strength and endurance, which itself caused huge anxiety for Dickson. As a result of these physical and mental pressures, Dickson slipped from her perch as one of Canada's most promising young biathletes.

    Eventually, in September 2016, she was diagnosed with celiac disease. Before the diagnosis, Dickson said, she had “a lot of fatigue, I just felt tired in training all the time and I wasn't responding to my training and I wasn't recovering well and I had a few things going on, but nothing that pointed to celiac.”

    It took a little over a year for Dickson to eliminate gluten, and begin to heal her body. She still hasn’t fully recovered, which makes competing more of a challenge, but, she says improving steadily, and expects to be fully recovered in the next few months. Dickson’s diagnosis was prompted when her older sister Kate tested positive for celiac, which carries a hereditary component. "Once we figured out it was celiac and we looked at all the symptoms it all made sense,” said Dickson.

    Dickson’s own positive test proved to be both a revelation and a catalyst for her own goals as an athlete. Armed with there new diagnosis, a gluten-free diet, and a body that is steadily healing, Dickson is looking to reap the benefits of improved strength, recovery and endurance to ramp up her training and competition results.

    Keep your eyes open for the 20-year-old native of Burns Lake, British Columbia. Next season, she will be competing internationally, making a big jump to the senior ranks, and hopefully a regular next on the IBU Cup tour.

    Read more at princegeorgecitizen.com

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, and science. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com.

    Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book Dangerous Grains by James Braly, MD and Ron Hoggan, MA.

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    Celiac.com 09/16/2011 - Add Green Bay Packer running back James Starks to the list of professional athletes who are reaping the benefits of going gluten-free, after experiencing health issues.
    Though Starks has not released an official diagnosis, his new diet may indicate celiac disease. If so, changing his diet and avoiding gluten will likely improve his immune system, energy level, and overall health.
    Starks told reporters recently that, before his change, he had "…been feasting off of carbs thinking it was good, but my body didn't react to it the right way. That played a big part in the healing process."
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    Gryphon Myers
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    Celiac.com 07/31/2012 - Dana Vollmer could be walking (or swimming) proof of the benefits a gluten-free diet can afford athletes. In the second day of London's 2012 Olympics, Vollmer, who suffers from gluten sensitivity and an egg allergy, took the gold medal in the Women's 100-meter butterfly final, breaking her own personal record, as well as the world record.
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    Sources:
    http://www.nbcsandiego.com/news/health/Gluten-Free-Dana-Vollmer-164310186.html http://twitter.com/danavollmer http://kidshealth.org/kid/health_problems/allergiesimmune/vollmer.html

    Jefferson Adams
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    Celiac.com 11/25/2013 - More and more professional athletes are claiming to reap benefits from adopting a gluten-free diet. What’s the science behind these claims?
    Writing for the Washington Post, Anna Medaris Miller has a very solid article in which she investigates the science behind the claims by many professional athletes that they has reaped tremendous physical benefits by adopting a gluten-free diet.
    Miller cites the growing popularity of gluten-free foods in general, as well as the move away from carbs by many professional athletes. She notes that New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees, the Garmin cycling team and top tennis players Andy Roddick and Novak Djokovic have all been vocal about the benefits of gluten-free diets.
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    In fact, Miller offers her own experience:
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    Source:
    Article from The Washington Post by Anna Medaris Miller, an associate editor of Monitor on Psychology magazine and a health columnist at TheDailyMuse.com.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/26/2015 - The vast majority of people who follow a gluten-free diet do not have celiac disease or gluten intolerance. Many people who follow a gluten-free diet do so because of perceived health benefits. This includes a number of athletes who feel that the diet improves their energy levels, performance and recovery time.
    In fact, the adoption of gluten-free diets by non-celiac athletes has risen sharply in recent years due to perceived ergogenic and health benefits. New research however, casts doubt on those ideas.
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    Source:
    Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise: Post Acceptance: May 12, 2015. doi: 10.1249/MSS.0000000000000699

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