Jump to content

Important Information

This site places cookies on your device (Cookie settings). Continued use is acceptance of our Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

  • Sign Up
  • Join our community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

  • Member Statistics

    84,906
    Total Members
    4,125
    Most Online
    Bwgilbert
    Newest Member
    Bwgilbert
    Joined
  • 0

    Dunkin Ditches Gluten-free Donuts


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 02/10/2014 - Dunkin' Donuts is quietly ditching its much publicized, much anticipated campaign to introduce gluten-free donuts across the nation.

    Photo: CC--Robert BanhInformation is scant, as Dunkin' has not issued any official press release. Dunkin' Donuts did, however, release the following statement to Gluten-Free Living:

    "In 2013, we tested a gluten-free Cinnamon Sugar Donut and Blueberry Muffin in select markets. We are currently assessing the results of this test, as well as feedback from our guests and franchisees, and we do not have plans to launch these products nationally at this time. We are continuing to develop additional gluten-free products for future tests, and we remain committed to exploring ways to offer our guests gluten-free choices."

    Word is that the rollout was doomed partly by complaints about the quality of the gluten-free donuts Dunkin' was offering, among other issues.

    We will do our best to keep you updated on this and other gluten-free stories.

    In the meantime, what do you think of the news? Is it better to not do gluten-free at all than to do it poorly? Are you disappointed? Share your comments below.

    Source:


    0


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments



    Guest Mickey Wesler

    Posted

    I am extremely disappointed - although I am not myself a donut eater - the blueberry muffin was what I had my eye on.

    More than that I am sad that a national company is not going to provide an alternative to those of us who do no eat gluten - no matter the cause - Dunkin' Donuts you have really set back the cause of providing gluten free alternative rather than taking a leadership role. I am sure if you went the muffin route and other "bread or cake" routes we would be happy to have the alternative when we come in for coffee. I am very disappointed in your "give up" attitude rather than choosing to us an alternative with muffins.

    Your were a leader in my mind - now you are giving up rather than going to Plan B. Gluten free foods can be tasty .

    A sorely disappointed gluten free family!

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I read of Dunkin' Donuts' gluten-free doughnut with interest, but was highly skeptical and am not surprised to find that it failed. I am a life-long foodie about three years into a celiac diagnosis. My conclusion, after tasting lots of gluten-free baked goods, is that I would rather bake/buy authentically, originally gluten-free baked goods (meringues, macaroons, flourless chocolate cake, etc.) and then cheat once every three months with a real piece of pizza, cake, or brownie, than chase the promise of gluten-free baked goods every day of the week and face constant disappointment. With very VERY few exceptions, I do not believe it is possible to make a fluffy, stretchy, moist, light, and tasty baked good -- pizza crust, muffin, sourdough bread, cake, etc. -- without using wheat. That makes me sad, but sorry folks, it's the truth.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest jose Suerte

    Posted

    It is a little disappointing. DD regular baked good were never anything to go out of ones way for. You can better baked goods (gluten-free and with G) at most grocery stores now.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Not disappointed at all! I'm a very sensitive celiac and I would not have taken the risk of cross contamination. 20ppm is 20 parts too many for me! Thanks for trying Dunkin!

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Their gluten-free donuts were not very good, especially for the price.

     

    The muffins were good, though a bit pricey. But the fact they were sealed and separate from the rest of the products was nice.

     

    Would actually love it if they had gluten-free bagels....

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    If the products were poor - and we can get plenty of that right now - then no one would buy the products. No sense for the customer or the company....

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Although I am not a huge donut or muffin person, I do on occasion enjoy having a donut or muffin, especially if I am running late. Time crunch is usually when I need a gluten-free option the most, and that is when it is the hardest to find a gluten free choice. With the growth of celiac disease and even those who choose gluten free as an lifestyle, many restaurants and fast food chains are missing the boat on this. Limited options in dining out are one of the reasons many find living gluten-free so hard.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Olinda Paul

    Posted

    I am too disappointed that they have temporarily chosen to excel in this field. Granted doing gluten-free is a bit tricky at times. I would rather they regroup and try again than to put out a bad donut/product. They have high standards for themselves and they should have them with gluten-free doughnuts too. Hey, I would LOVE a good donut once in a while. I haven't had a really good one in 17 years. Most of them too dry or contain GM corn or milk products in them too. So if your multi-allergic like me...and many are...you don't get donuts.

    Good for you for re-grouping and trying to get it right. I love that. I would rather have it be an awesome donut than a dry, flavorless product. Here is to hoping for the best.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Christy

    Posted

    It is disappointing that they can't come up with a product that tastes good. General Mills managed to come up with gluten free cereals (Chex) that is wonderful. Please keep trying.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    It is disappointing that they can't come up with a product that tastes good. General Mills managed to come up with gluten free cereals (Chex) that is wonderful. Please keep trying.

    GM didn't exactly come up with Rice Chex...they only had to make 1 substitution to get rid of barley malt for a gluten-free sweetener.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites



    Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

    Guest
    You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, and science. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com.

    Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book Dangerous Grains by James Braly, MD and Ron Hoggan, MA.

  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    Gut 2000;46:332-335
    (Celiac.com 03/17/2000) In the latest issue of Gut, Italian researchers propose that celiac disease is more common than previously thought, and that pregnant women should be screened for celiac disease. They conclude that a screening could help women to avoid negative outcomes and miscarriages. Dr. L. Greco and his colleagues from the University of Naples Federico II screened blood samples from 845 pregnant women in an effort to determine the prevalence of celiac disease. They looked for elevated levels of endomysial antibodies against tissue transglutaminase to determine how many of them had celiac disease. Out of the 845, women 12 had celiac disease (1.4%), and only three of the 12 had been previously diagnosed and were not following a gluten-free diet. The other nine women underwent a small intestinal biopsy to confirm their diagnosis. Out of the 12 diagnosed women, seven had either a pre-term delivery, or their babies were smaller than normal. Out of the remaining five women, four had had at least one miscarriage. Three of the babies died.
    When following up with 11 of the women, eight had another pregnancy and seven of them had reached term at the time of publication. Out of the eight women, five followed a gluten-free diet, and six of their babies turned out healthy. According to the researchers: Coeliac disease is considerably more common than most of the diseases for which pregnant women are routinely screened. The authors conclude: Consideration should be given to screening for coeliac disease in pregnancy, because of the high incidence of avoidable outcomes and the chance of reversibility through consumption of a gluten-free diet.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 08/09/2012 - Among many gluten-free catholics, there's been a good deal of excitement lately about low-gluten and gluten-free communion wafers for Mass in the Catholic church.
    However, much of that excitement seems to have been misplaced, at least in Ohio. That's because the Catholic Diocese of Columbus recently said that gluten-free wafers don’t meet Vatican standards because they don’t contain wheat.
    For Catholics, consecrated bread and wine are the literal body and blood of Jesus, and the sacrament of Holy Eucharist is “the heart and the summit of the Church’s life,” according to its catechism.
    Because Jesus ate wheat bread with his apostles before his Crucifixion, church law requires the host to be wheat and only wheat, said Deacon Martin Davies, director of the Office for Divine Worship at the Diocese of Columbus. Without wheat, the wafers cannot be consecrated and used in Mass, so no gluten-free wafers.
    In 1995, the Vatican said low-gluten hosts are valid if they hold enough gluten to make bread. Worshippers wanting the low-gluten option were required to present a medical certificate and obtain a bishop’s approval.
    The policy was loosened in 2003 to eliminate the medical-certificate requirement and to allow pastors to grant approval. The Vatican also said that Catholics with celiac disease could receive Communion via wine only.
    However, for faithful catholics with celiac disease and gluten intolerance who want to participate more fully, the low-gluten version, which some say tastes terrible, remains the only communion wafer option.
    U.S. Catholic bishops have approved two manufacturers of low-gluten wafers. One is the Benedictine Sisters of Perpetual Adoration in Missouri; the order’s website says it has provided hosts for more than 2,000 celiac sufferers. The other is Parish Crossroads in Indiana, which provides low-gluten hosts made in Germany.
    The low-gluten wafers made by the Benedictine Sisters contain less than 100 parts per million, says Mary Kay Sharrett, a clinical dietitian at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. She said the amount of gluten in one of the hosts is 0.004 milligrams and that researchers have found it takes about 10 milligrams per day to start a reaction.
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has proposed a rule that says products could be labeled gluten-free if the gluten content is less than 20 parts per million.
    Source:
    The Columbus Dispatch

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/01/2013 - In my opinion, donuts are right up there with beer and pizza among the beloved foods I missed most after going gluten-free. That said, there has been strong progress on developing delicious gluten-free beers, and gluten-free pizza is one of the hottest, fastest growing trends among pizza retailers. So, there is some relief on those two fronts. However, the delightful donut is one food I expected never to enjoy again, after going gluten-free.
    So, imagine my surprise and delight to learn that Dunkin' Donuts is testing gluten-free donuts at limited locations in southern Florida and the Boston area.
    There is currently no official word from Dunkin' Donuts on when they plan to expand their gluten-free offerings. An official statement from the company read, in part: "…we have received very positive feedback on the new products so far. We do not yet have a timeframe for potential national distribution.”
    Meanwhile, a south Florida franchisee has said that while the test is currently limited to a few stores, the company plans to expand it in February.
    According to the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness says that Dunkin' Donuts' gluten-free products will be individually wrapped and calls them "dangerously delicious."
    Dunkin' Donuts' efforts to break into the fast growing gluten-free market puts them in league with a number of other fast food chains seeking to add gluten free items to their menus, including Wendy's, Arby's, Domino's and Chick-Fil-A.
    Will Dunkin' Donuts be successful in their efforts to roll out a gluten-free donut worthy of the Dunkin' Donuts name? Are you one of the many gluten-free eaters who would welcome a nice little donut fix? Share your comments below and stay tuned for the latest gluten-free developments

  • Popular Contributors

×