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    Dunkin Ditches Gluten-free Donuts


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 02/10/2014 - Dunkin' Donuts is quietly ditching its much publicized, much anticipated campaign to introduce gluten-free donuts across the nation.


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    Photo: CC--Robert BanhInformation is scant, as Dunkin' has not issued any official press release. Dunkin' Donuts did, however, release the following statement to Gluten-Free Living:

    "In 2013, we tested a gluten-free Cinnamon Sugar Donut and Blueberry Muffin in select markets. We are currently assessing the results of this test, as well as feedback from our guests and franchisees, and we do not have plans to launch these products nationally at this time. We are continuing to develop additional gluten-free products for future tests, and we remain committed to exploring ways to offer our guests gluten-free choices."

    Word is that the rollout was doomed partly by complaints about the quality of the gluten-free donuts Dunkin' was offering, among other issues.

    We will do our best to keep you updated on this and other gluten-free stories.

    In the meantime, what do you think of the news? Is it better to not do gluten-free at all than to do it poorly? Are you disappointed? Share your comments below.

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    Guest Mickey Wesler

    Posted

    I am extremely disappointed - although I am not myself a donut eater - the blueberry muffin was what I had my eye on.

    More than that I am sad that a national company is not going to provide an alternative to those of us who do no eat gluten - no matter the cause - Dunkin' Donuts you have really set back the cause of providing gluten free alternative rather than taking a leadership role. I am sure if you went the muffin route and other "bread or cake" routes we would be happy to have the alternative when we come in for coffee. I am very disappointed in your "give up" attitude rather than choosing to us an alternative with muffins.

    Your were a leader in my mind - now you are giving up rather than going to Plan B. Gluten free foods can be tasty .

    A sorely disappointed gluten free family!

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    I read of Dunkin' Donuts' gluten-free doughnut with interest, but was highly skeptical and am not surprised to find that it failed. I am a life-long foodie about three years into a celiac diagnosis. My conclusion, after tasting lots of gluten-free baked goods, is that I would rather bake/buy authentically, originally gluten-free baked goods (meringues, macaroons, flourless chocolate cake, etc.) and then cheat once every three months with a real piece of pizza, cake, or brownie, than chase the promise of gluten-free baked goods every day of the week and face constant disappointment. With very VERY few exceptions, I do not believe it is possible to make a fluffy, stretchy, moist, light, and tasty baked good -- pizza crust, muffin, sourdough bread, cake, etc. -- without using wheat. That makes me sad, but sorry folks, it's the truth.

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    Guest jose Suerte

    Posted

    It is a little disappointing. DD regular baked good were never anything to go out of ones way for. You can better baked goods (gluten-free and with G) at most grocery stores now.

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    Not disappointed at all! I'm a very sensitive celiac and I would not have taken the risk of cross contamination. 20ppm is 20 parts too many for me! Thanks for trying Dunkin!

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    Their gluten-free donuts were not very good, especially for the price.

     

    The muffins were good, though a bit pricey. But the fact they were sealed and separate from the rest of the products was nice.

     

    Would actually love it if they had gluten-free bagels....

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    If the products were poor - and we can get plenty of that right now - then no one would buy the products. No sense for the customer or the company....

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    Although I am not a huge donut or muffin person, I do on occasion enjoy having a donut or muffin, especially if I am running late. Time crunch is usually when I need a gluten-free option the most, and that is when it is the hardest to find a gluten free choice. With the growth of celiac disease and even those who choose gluten free as an lifestyle, many restaurants and fast food chains are missing the boat on this. Limited options in dining out are one of the reasons many find living gluten-free so hard.

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    Guest Olinda Paul

    Posted

    I am too disappointed that they have temporarily chosen to excel in this field. Granted doing gluten-free is a bit tricky at times. I would rather they regroup and try again than to put out a bad donut/product. They have high standards for themselves and they should have them with gluten-free doughnuts too. Hey, I would LOVE a good donut once in a while. I haven't had a really good one in 17 years. Most of them too dry or contain GM corn or milk products in them too. So if your multi-allergic like me...and many are...you don't get donuts.

    Good for you for re-grouping and trying to get it right. I love that. I would rather have it be an awesome donut than a dry, flavorless product. Here is to hoping for the best.

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    Guest Christy

    Posted

    It is disappointing that they can't come up with a product that tastes good. General Mills managed to come up with gluten free cereals (Chex) that is wonderful. Please keep trying.

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    It is disappointing that they can't come up with a product that tastes good. General Mills managed to come up with gluten free cereals (Chex) that is wonderful. Please keep trying.

    GM didn't exactly come up with Rice Chex...they only had to make 1 substitution to get rid of barley malt for a gluten-free sweetener.

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    I read of Dunkin' Donuts' gluten-free doughnut with interest, but was highly skeptical and am not surprised to find that it failed. I am a life-long foodie about three years into a celiac diagnosis. My conclusion, after tasting lots of gluten-free baked goods, is that I would rather bake/buy authentically, originally gluten-free baked goods (meringues, macaroons, flourless chocolate cake, etc.) and then cheat once every three months with a real piece of pizza, cake, or brownie, than chase the promise of gluten-free baked goods every day of the week and face constant disappointment. With very VERY few exceptions, I do not believe it is possible to make a fluffy, stretchy, moist, light, and tasty baked good -- pizza crust, muffin, sourdough bread, cake, etc. -- without using wheat. That makes me sad, but sorry folks, it's the truth.

    Apparently you don't take being a celiac seriously enough if you are cheating every three months with a wheat product. Do you understand what you are doing to your body by doing that? Your choice....

    That being said - after eating gluten-free for over 30 years I can tell you there are plenty of recipes that will give you cakes, muffins, macaroons, and yes pizzas that taste just as good as they did with the wheat.

    You need to make a commitment to your body that you want it to live and not want to kill it off - and you will go searching for these wonderful recipes 'foodie' and you will soon discover that wheat is not all that it's cracked up to be.

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    Guest Dolores

    Posted

    I am a grandmother of a celiac so I know the trials and tribulations that she goes through. We were both so much looking forward to a breakthrough of a gluten-free donut, not only so much to provide for a gluten-free donut but as an encouragement to the food industry to provide more delicious tasting gluten-free foods. It has not been an easy road because it is a struggle to find products that taste "almost" normal. I remember when my grandchild was diagnosed with celiac in high school she cried, "But, I am a teenager part of enjoying being in high school is getting together and eating pizza with everyone." I encourage the food industry to look at how profitable it would be to them to produce good tasting gluten-food products at a reasonable price. All mothers and grandmothers of celiacs, and celiacs, will agree with me!!

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    Guest sc'Que?

    Posted

    GM didn't exactly come up with Rice Chex...they only had to make 1 substitution to get rid of barley malt for a gluten-free sweetener.

    Thank you, admin, for pointing this out. Many miss this point.

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    Guest NY Gluten Free

    Posted

    I too am disappointed that Dunkin' is not going thru with gluten-free. I was looking forward to the muffins. I currently get gluten-free muffins via the internet out-of-state and have them shipped to my home. The cost is high and I was hoping Dunkin' could have saved me some money so I could get them locally.

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    I read of Dunkin' Donuts' gluten-free doughnut with interest, but was highly skeptical and am not surprised to find that it failed. I am a life-long foodie about three years into a celiac diagnosis. My conclusion, after tasting lots of gluten-free baked goods, is that I would rather bake/buy authentically, originally gluten-free baked goods (meringues, macaroons, flourless chocolate cake, etc.) and then cheat once every three months with a real piece of pizza, cake, or brownie, than chase the promise of gluten-free baked goods every day of the week and face constant disappointment. With very VERY few exceptions, I do not believe it is possible to make a fluffy, stretchy, moist, light, and tasty baked good -- pizza crust, muffin, sourdough bread, cake, etc. -- without using wheat. That makes me sad, but sorry folks, it's the truth.

    Enid,

    I am a huge foodie!! and you haven't been looking in the right place. Almost 7 years ago I had a son and we almost both died. After and extended coma I was diagnosed with celiac and my son as well. But he is also HIGHLY allergic to CORN. So we eat NO processed food because many food additives are made from corn. A lot of celiac patients can't tolerate any grains even soy (that is me, can't even have coffee or chocolate without a reaction). I make a wonderful bread that is fluffy and moist and airy. It is made with cashews and eggs. The recipe is from a book called

    AGAINST ALL GRAIN. It is awesome!!! Guest have eaten it then asked cause they thought I couldn't have grains in my home. They are shocked to learn it was made with no grain. The gluten-free label is meaningless until they make gluten free mean NO gluten. currently gluten free means less then 20 parts per million. And don't get me started on the cross contamination in packaging and factories.

    Anyway, if you want awesome recipes that are completely grain and dairy free this is an awesome book. P.S. YOU have to try the Dairy free "New England Clam Chowder" it is unbelievable how good it is.

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    Guest maxiesmom

    Posted

    I read of Dunkin' Donuts' gluten-free doughnut with interest, but was highly skeptical and am not surprised to find that it failed. I am a life-long foodie about three years into a celiac diagnosis. My conclusion, after tasting lots of gluten-free baked goods, is that I would rather bake/buy authentically, originally gluten-free baked goods (meringues, macaroons, flourless chocolate cake, etc.) and then cheat once every three months with a real piece of pizza, cake, or brownie, than chase the promise of gluten-free baked goods every day of the week and face constant disappointment. With very VERY few exceptions, I do not believe it is possible to make a fluffy, stretchy, moist, light, and tasty baked good -- pizza crust, muffin, sourdough bread, cake, etc. -- without using wheat. That makes me sad, but sorry folks, it's the truth.

    Enid, I disagree with you. I bought King Arthur muffin mix and am very happy with the results. the muffins came out moist, fluffy and tasty. I myself do not need to eat gluten-free foods, I made them for my husband who has a wheat allergy. Domata flour is also very good and my friends couldn't tell that the cookies I made with it were gluten-free.

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    Guest Marcie

    Posted

    I am happy to get an update on this subject to share with my CSA Chapter #110 support group.

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    Guest Steve

    Posted

    My son who is celiac will be greatly disappointed when I tell him. I had emailed Dunkin' Donuts and they told me by the end of 2013. He was so excited they were gonna have donuts. He's been gluten-free for 7 years now.

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    Guest Mike

    Posted

    I read of Dunkin' Donuts' gluten-free doughnut with interest, but was highly skeptical and am not surprised to find that it failed. I am a life-long foodie about three years into a celiac diagnosis. My conclusion, after tasting lots of gluten-free baked goods, is that I would rather bake/buy authentically, originally gluten-free baked goods (meringues, macaroons, flourless chocolate cake, etc.) and then cheat once every three months with a real piece of pizza, cake, or brownie, than chase the promise of gluten-free baked goods every day of the week and face constant disappointment. With very VERY few exceptions, I do not believe it is possible to make a fluffy, stretchy, moist, light, and tasty baked good -- pizza crust, muffin, sourdough bread, cake, etc. -- without using wheat. That makes me sad, but sorry folks, it's the truth.

    Don't agree, we make a lot of very good baked goods, pizza, muffins, cake, that extended family members who eat wheat say are very good. Just a matter of learning how, and some things (biscuits) don't work.

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    If they can't do it we'll then don't do it! The last thing us celiacs need is a company doing gluten-free half assed! I live in Sacramento ca and we go to apple hill every year. One place decided to start making gluten-free apple pies but when I called she told me her oat topping was not made with gluten-free oats because they were too expensive! I told her she cannot sell them as gluten-free, and is opening up herself to a lawsuit! I pray that this year she is using gluten-free oats or there will be hell to pay!

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    Apparently you don't take being a celiac seriously enough if you are cheating every three months with a wheat product. Do you understand what you are doing to your body by doing that? Your choice....

    That being said - after eating gluten-free for over 30 years I can tell you there are plenty of recipes that will give you cakes, muffins, macaroons, and yes pizzas that taste just as good as they did with the wheat.

    You need to make a commitment to your body that you want it to live and not want to kill it off - and you will go searching for these wonderful recipes 'foodie' and you will soon discover that wheat is not all that it's cracked up to be.

    Totally agree!! I'm not willing to be sick just to cheat. I'll wait... Or make my own.

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    I read of Dunkin' Donuts' gluten-free doughnut with interest, but was highly skeptical and am not surprised to find that it failed. I am a life-long foodie about three years into a celiac diagnosis. My conclusion, after tasting lots of gluten-free baked goods, is that I would rather bake/buy authentically, originally gluten-free baked goods (meringues, macaroons, flourless chocolate cake, etc.) and then cheat once every three months with a real piece of pizza, cake, or brownie, than chase the promise of gluten-free baked goods every day of the week and face constant disappointment. With very VERY few exceptions, I do not believe it is possible to make a fluffy, stretchy, moist, light, and tasty baked good -- pizza crust, muffin, sourdough bread, cake, etc. -- without using wheat. That makes me sad, but sorry folks, it's the truth.

    I am a celiac and if I decided to cheat as you mention, I would end up on the bathroom floor vomiting for hours. It is not worth it! Once I went on the no gluten diet I could not go back without HUGE side effects.

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    If you can tolerate uncontaminated oats, make a bowl of oatmeal and add a little extra fiber by stirring in chopped walnuts and dried cranberries.  If you like scrambled eggs, toss some fresh spinach (sliced into thin strips), 1 chopped canned artichoke heart, two tablespoons crumbled feta cheese, and a dash of Italian seasoning to the egg as it cooks.  
    If you have time on weekends to make healthy gluten-free pancakes (which  means that you added perhaps flax seed meal or shredded apples or something that qualifies as fiber to the batter), then freeze the pancakes between sheets of wax paper, place them in a freezer bag, and freeze so they’ll be handy on busy weekday mornings.  If you don’t have time to make them prior to need, you can always use commercial frozen gluten-free pancakes.  In a bowl, mix together a few raisins, half of a chopped pear or apple, a few dashes of cinnamon and a couple of tablespoons of chopped walnuts.  Spoon this mixture down the centers of two toasted (or microwaved) pancakes, drizzle each with 1 teaspoon of pancake or maple syrup, then fold in the sides of the pancakes to make two breakfast sandwiches.
    Brown rice is brown because the bran layer is still on the rice, and the bran layer is the part that’s so high in fiber.  White rice is much lower in fiber and has less nutritional value.  Brown rice isn’t just for dinner anymore.  It offers a nice breakfast alternative from traditional hot cereals.  The next time you make brown rice for dinner, make a little extra and save some for breakfast the next morning.  In the A.M., mix the rice (about 1 cup) with a few chopped pecans, a few raisins, 1/2 cup milk, 3 tablespoons pancake syrup, a dash each of vanilla and cinnamon, then microwave the mixture for 1 minute, stirring once after 30 seconds.  Let it sit for 30 seconds to thicken before eating.  Or stir together 1 cup cooked brown rice, 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon, 1/2 navel orange diced, some chopped dates, dried cranberries, and shredded coconut; heat this in the microwave and then top it off with 1/2 cup low-fat vanilla yogurt.
    Just a note about using the microwave—it’s not an exact science.  Different ovens have different power levels so what cooks in 30 seconds in one person’s microwave may take 45 seconds in someone else’s unit.  Unless you want the food to splatter all over the sides of the oven, you’ll need to cover any liquids or soft foods with waxed paper.  
    There will be days when you don’t have time to sit down at the table and enjoy a leisurely breakfast.  On these days, make a “grab-and-go” breakfast that you can take with you.  Gluten-free wraps keep for several weeks in the refrigerator and they make great fill-and-go containers on busy mornings.  Spread a wrap with peanut butter, sprinkle some fortified gluten-free dry cereal on top, then drizzle with a teaspoon of pancake syrup; roll up the wrap and you have the perfect dashboard dining breakfast to eat on the way to work.  Or scramble an egg, spoon it down the center of the wrap, and then top it off with a little salsa and pepper-jack cheese before rolling it up. If you only have three minutes before you have to leave the house, spoon some low-fat cottage cheese into a cup, stir in a dash of cinnamon, top with a little low-fat gluten-free granola or fortified dry gluten-free cereal, sprinkle berries or chopped peaches over the top, grab a spoon, and you’re ready to go!
    Smoothies can be made in literally one minute.  Toss some frozen raspberries into a blender, add a 12-ounce container of low-fat lemon yogurt, a little milk, and two teaspoons of vanilla; blend, then pour the mixture into a large plastic cup.
    If you oversleep, don’t panic.  Have some back-up foods on hand that you can grab and eat en route to work, like a gluten-free protein bar and a banana, or a bag of nuts and dried fruit, or flax seed crackers with a handful of cheese cubes, or toss some gluten-free granola over a container of yogurt and grab a spoon to take along.
    All of the above suggestions can be made in five minutes or less.  Take the time to start your day off with a healthy breakfast—you deserve to do that for yourself and for your family.
    Apple English Muffins by Connie Sarros
    This recipe is from my newly-released book Student’s Vegetarian Cookbook for Dummies.  While this isn’t a gluten-free cookbook, most of the recipes are naturally gluten-free or can very easily be converted to gluten-free.  
    Preparation time:  4 minutes.  Cooking time:  30 seconds.  Yield:  1 serving
    Ingredients:
    1 tablespoon peanut butter  1 gluten-free English muffin, toasted  1/8 large apple, peeled, cored and sliced thin ½ teaspoon butter  ¾ teaspoon brown sugar 1/8 teaspoon cinnamon Directions:
    Spread peanut butter on one toasted English muffin half.  Lay the apple slices on top. In a small microwave safe bowl, heat the butter in the microwave on high for 15 seconds.  Stir in the brown sugar and cinnamon then nuke for another 15 seconds.  Stir until smooth.  (If necessary, pop it back into the microwave until the brown sugar melts).   Drizzle the cinnamon mixture over the apple slices then place the second half of the English muffin on top. Note:  If you’re out of apples, use a pear, ripe peach or nectarine, mango, or even a banana.

    Jefferson Adams
    Can a New Gluten-Free Cricket-Flour Cookbook Turn Americans on to Eating Bugs?
    Celiac.com 08/09/2018 - Whatever one might say about crawfish, shrimp and crustaceans in general, Americans don’t typically eat bugs. Can a former Ralph Lauren marketing executive turn the world on to flour made from crickets?
    Over the last few years, Americans have been presented with a buffet of alternative proteins and meals. Robyn Shapiro’s company, Seek, has created all-purpose, gluten-free, and Paleo blended flours, which can be used cup for cup in any recipe calling for flour. 
    The company, which makes pure cricket powder for smoothies, ice creams, and other liquid-based foods, is now selling cinnamon-almond crunch cricket protein and snack bites. To get the public interested in its cricket protein and cricket flour products, Shapiro has collaborated with famous chefs to create recipes for The Cricket Cookbook. 
    The book’s cast includes La Newyorkina chef Fany Gerson, a Mexico City native known for her cricket sundaes; noted Sioux chef and cookbook author Sean Sherman; and former Noma pastry chef Ghetto Gastro member, Malcolm Livingston, among others.
    Other companies have sought to promote the benefits of insect protein, including Chapul, which makes cricket protein bars and powders, and Exo, which makes dairy- and gluten-free cricket protein bars in flavors like cocoa nut and banana bread. These companies, along with others in the business tend to aim their products at Paleo dieters by promising more protein and no dairy.
    Seek’s chef-focused approach makes it unique. By pairing with noted chefs who already use bugs and bug protein in their cooking, Shapiro is looking to make the public more comfortable and confident in using bugs to cook and bake. So far, the response has been slow, but steady. Seek has already raised nearly $13,000 from 28 backers, well on its way toward its $25,000 goal. 
    Seek’s cricket flours and other products will initially only be available via Kickstarter. If that goes well, the products will be sold on Seek’s website. Early backers will get a discount and a chance for a signed copy of the book. Seek hopes to debut their products nationwide starting in the fall. 
    Could gluten-free cricket flour and the new cookbook be the next big gluten-free Christmas gift? Stay tuned for more on this and other gluten-free stories.
    Source:
    grubstreet.com