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    Dunkin Takes Its Time With Gluten-free Donuts


    Jefferson Adams

    Update: Dunkin' Donuts has released the following statement to Gluten-Free Living:
    "In 2013, we tested a gluten-free Cinnamon Sugar Donut and Blueberry Muffin in select markets. We are currently assessing the results of this test, as well as feedback from our guests and franchisees, and we do not have plans to launch these products nationally at this time. We are continuing to develop additional gluten-free products for future tests, and we remain committed to exploring ways to offer our guests gluten-free choices."


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    Celiac.com 01/30/2014 - Why is Dunkin' Donuts taking so long to debut gluten-free versions of its famous treats? First came the whispers of test marketing and then the official announcement, but then…?

    Photo: Wikimedia Commons--TianliuFor more than a year, donut lovers who avoid dietary gluten due to celiac disease or other conditions have been eagerly awaiting the chance to sink their teeth into a gluten-free donut from Dunkin'.

    For its part, the company seems intent on getting gluten-free right. They have spent a great deal of time, and I assume money, creating a reliable, safe gluten-free production and distribution chain.

    From source materials to dedicated gluten-free production facility to special production methods, to comprehensive training and service, Dunkin' looks to be taking its gluten-free donut rollout with the utmost seriousness.

    For a more detailed account of Dunkin's much anticipated gluten-free donut rollout, Venessa Wong has an excellent article in Bloomberg Businessweek.

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    Dunkin' Donuts announced weeks ago they will not be proceeding with the roll-out. Try keeping up with the news.

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    Anyone in the northeast suburbs of Philly who wants a gluten-free donut should try the Happy Mixer an new gluten-free Bakery in Chalfont, PA on County Line Rd. My son is a very picky gluten-free eater and he LOVES their donuts, he says their cookies & cupcakes are very good too, but the donuts are especially fantastic.

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    Guest Sybil Nassau

    Posted

    A little more research would have quickly disclosed in fact that DD did, in fact, come out with both a donut and a "blueberry" muffin which were both so bad as to be inedible. Test areas near Miami, Brookline MA, and Connecticut were so excited to see the roll out and then came the test. We tasted. We spit them out, We did not buy any more. The muffin was dry, crumbly and awful. The donut small, too sweet and again, dry and cumbly. The good part was the individual wrapping allowing these to be kept frozen and ready for eating-- I think heating them for a few seconds might have been helpful. But I have to say these were one of the worst tasting gluten-free items I have ever tried. The price point was way too high as well. I would rather do without, so I hope they are coming up with a much better product!

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    Guest Jefferson

    Posted

    Dunkin' Donuts announced weeks ago they will not be proceeding with the roll-out. Try keeping up with the news.

    Thank you for this. Though the article was completed before Dunkin's announcement, the announcement did come before we got the article live. Apologies for that. We'll correct the story to reflect the latest development from Dunkin' Donuts.

     

    For those unfamiliar, Dunkin' released the following statement to Gluten-Free Living, confirming the news:

     

    "In 2013, we tested a gluten-free Cinnamon Sugar Donut and Blueberry Muffin in select markets. We are currently assessing the results of this test, as well as feedback from our guests and franchisees, and we do not have plans to launch these products nationally at this time. We are continuing to develop additional gluten-free products for future tests, and we remain committed to exploring ways to offer our guests gluten-free choices."

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    Guest Scott Vitulli

    Posted

    Try Katz Gluten Free donuts they are really good.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. He has covered Health News for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. His work has appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate, among others.

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