• Join our community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

  • Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsSubscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

  • Member Statistics

    72,195
    Total Members
    3,093
    Most Online
    Viv44
    Newest Member
    Viv44
    Joined
  • Announcements

    • admin

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/24/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What is Celiac Disease and the Gluten-Free Diet? What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
  • 0

    FIGHT BREWS OVER GLUTEN-FREE BEER STANDARDS


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 07/18/2013 - If you brew a bunch of beer using traditional wheat and barley, then add enzymes to break down gluten proteins so that the final product tests negative for gluten, is the beer actually gluten-free? Should it be labeled as gluten-free?


    Ads by Google:




    ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW ADS
    Ads by Google:



    Photo: CC--Andrew-HydeMany brewmasters, and some with celiac disease say 'yes.' Others, including government regulators say 'no.'

    That's the root of the big fight brewing between Oregon brewmasters at Craft Brew Alliance and U.S. government regulators over what kinds of beer can and cannot be labeled gluten-free.

    On the one hand, numerous brewmasters are now brewing beer with traditional barley, and then using an enzymatic process to break down the gluten proteins so that the final product has no detectable levels of gluten.

    Some regulators, and some gluten-free beer drinkers accept this approach, some do not. The U.S. government does not, and federal alcohol regulators have barred Craft Brew from calling Omission "gluten-free" outside Oregon. Currently, Craft Brew Alliance can label their Omission beers as 'gluten-free' only in Oregon, Canada, and Denmark.

    However, the regulators have said that the company can label their product as 'gluten-removed,' rather than gluten-free.'

    U.S. regulators argue that labeling beers made with wheat and/or barley as 'gluten-free' is likely to mislead consumers. They also add concerns about the small fragments of gluten that do remain in the final product. There simply isn't enough evidence to show that these beers are safe for people with celiac disease in the same way that beers made from gluten-free ingredients are safe.

    Recent tests by Canada's public health agency did show gluten fragments in beers from Spain and Belgium that use a gluten-removal process similar to the one used by Craft Brew for Omission beers. It's unclear whether the fragments are a health concern, Health Canada spokeswoman Blossom Leung said via email.

    In fact, some gluten-free individuals have had reactions that they attribute to such beers, though others have not. Could this be a sensitivity to the broken-down fragments of gluten protein? That important question remains unanswered.

    In the U.S., all sides are currently awaiting new rules by the FDA, which should provide labeling guidance for such cases.

    Since 2007, the FDA has considered allowing foods with less than 20 parts per million of gluten to be labeled "gluten-free." But its final proposal, now under review by the OMB, would prohibit such labeling on foods where no valid test exists to determine safety.

    Under such a rule, beers like Omission could not be labeled as 'gluten-free,' but could be labels as 'gluten-removed.' Craft Beers calls that part of the prospective rule "unnecessarily rigid."

    What do you think? Have you tried these kinds of beers? Do you support labeling them gluten-free, or should they be labeled 'gluten-removed?' Do we need to know more about possible adverse effects from these kinds of beers before we can say for sure?



    Image Caption: Photo: CC--Andrew-Hyde
    0


    User Feedback



    Recommended Comments

    I drink Omission, and there is a "test results" baby number on each bottle. I can use this code on their website to view a report for the batch of beer I purchased. Supposedly this is done by a third party lab. Are you telling me their testing is bogus?

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I tried the Omissin pale ale at a restaurant here in Oregon last night and woke up with a disproportionately severe headache. (My gluten intolerance manifests itself mostly in migraines, fatigue, and intestinal distress.) I would say I was definitely affected in some part by the remaining gluten.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Chris Miller

    Posted

    As a celiac for over 30 years, I am incensed by the tactic of this beer company. There has been a lot of progress in gluten-free labeling - this is a horrible step back. I will never buy another product from Craft Beers, as I clearly can't trust them to respect my disease. It isn't the same as labeling "trans-fat free" or some nonsense like that - this corporate lying/partial truth telling could severely affect people's health - and with improper labeling celiacs would be able to figure out where it was coming from (as it said "gluten-free").

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    My husband did have a gluten reaction to the Omission beer..."gluten removed" allows us to decide for ourselves based on our individual sensitivity!

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I tried Omission beer and had an immediate reaction. I don't normally react to slight cross contamination, but this beer did cause a reaction.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    My father used to get a migraine when he drank beer, so he stopped. I don't recall him having any problems with any gluten but it was 25 years ago. I would be curious to know what other reactions people are having to Omission. Celiac for 12 years here, officially, but I think since I was perhaps 12.

    I thought for awhile I had a reaction to bourbon, joint pain and a weird itchy, itchy rash on the same ankle. It went away in a week, and I've tried some bourbon that they test but don't mark because of the cost to label gluten-free. No problems. So I'd like to try Omission beers.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Jake Oldenburg

    Posted

    I'm glad more people are becoming aware of this attempt by Omission to dilute the meaning of gluten-free labeling. It's infuriating to see how often their beers are intentionally marketed, if not necessarily labeled (yet) as gluten-free, when it's becoming clear that the gluten fragments their process leaves behind are enough to make people sick. Let's hope that OMB rules the right way. It's hard enough for people with celiac without having to worry about misleading labeling standards.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Igliashon

    Posted

    I drink Omission, and there is a "test results" baby number on each bottle. I can use this code on their website to view a report for the batch of beer I purchased. Supposedly this is done by a third party lab. Are you telling me their testing is bogus?

    The test is only legitimate in theory; no clinical studies have been done to show that Omission is actually safe. It's the same deal as GMOs--they're safe in theory, but no studies have been done to test whether or not the theory reflects reality.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Isaac

    Posted

    I drink Omission, and there is a "test results" baby number on each bottle. I can use this code on their website to view a report for the batch of beer I purchased. Supposedly this is done by a third party lab. Are you telling me their testing is bogus?

    Tony -

    The issue is that the enzyme process breaks down the gluten into pieces. The ELISA test will only detect whole gluten proteins and not protein fragments.

     

    So while Omission may beat the test, there are still fragments of the gluten protein floating around in the beer. Some people may still react to these fragments, or they may not... no science has been done yet. The only way to know for sure would be to do biopsies on patients who have only had the beer without any other sources of gluten.

     

    Remember, many Celiacs can be reacting and damaging their intestines without obvious symptoms. I have known I had celiac for 20+ years and in my late teens/twenties it would take a serious gluten poisoning for me to experience noticeable symptoms. Now that I am in my 30's I am much more sensitive.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Igliashon

    Posted

    Glad the FDA is standing up to the mega-bucks of CBA, who are trying to market an untested product as being safe. The only thing omitted from Omission is the truth about its potential to cause harm! Without clinical evidence that demonstrates Omission's safety to all gluten-intolerant, they should not be able to label it as gluten-free.

     

    Personally, I've had reactions to the pale ale, and I won't touch the stuff.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I agree with J.L. that everyone needs to consider their own sensitivity. I am not suspicious of Craft Beers intentions, and I do not think they are trying to use tricky advertising to hurt anyone. I think it helps for context to understand that the brewmaster at Widmer Brothers created Omission because both his wife and another brewmaster at Widmer Brothers are gluten-intolerant. Oregon Live had a great article about it.

     

    I do wish we had a science-based standard for people with Celiac. Something like "<20 ppm is okay for gluten intolerance but Celiacs must have <2 ppm to be safe." I hope we will get there someday.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Profa40

    Posted

    Bought Omission, drank one bottle, had a reaction. Returned the rest of the 6 pack. I vote "gluten removed." I don't need a guessing game when it comes to my health.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Denise

    Posted

    Great article!!! I believe that if it contains or MADE with any form of gluten, that product should "never" be permitted the label usage of gluten-free. I like the idea of gluten removed, that tells exactly what it is. Using the words gluten-free should mean that - it is a sign that people with celiac disease (and others on gluten-free diet) can keep their disease or symptoms in remission. This beer company seems to be fighting for "sales" not for quality of life for those with celiac. Bottom line is - it will never be gluten free in my eyes if it begins with gluten in the first place, we are only asking for trouble if that passes. It's hard enough to read labels - we don't need to worry about that!!!

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest sc'Que?

    Posted

    It really just makes no sense to me why Omission would want to fight this one. Gluten-removed could just as easily have a recognized status in the craft beer (and food) world. But you'll never get there by deceiving (or even sweet-talking) your customers. As J.L. said above, each consumer should be given the tools to make this decision on their own!

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Bev Anderson

    Posted

    I agree with J. L. that the beer should not be labeled gluten-free but I question if 'gluten removed' is the way to go, since breaking down protein isn't the same to me as taking the gluten proteins out. Too many unanswered questions. We who have celiac disease are dealing with an allergy to gluten. The FDA took a giant step forward when labeling allergens became law. I believe minute amounts of gluten can cause a reaction, so I do everything to avoid it. Let's not make it harder for people to identify products which may cause them harm.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest maris

    Posted

    Why would Craft Beers call the part of the prospective rule that would require them to label their beer as gluten-removed "unnecessarily rigid"? It sounds to me like they are more worried about marketing their beer than about safely communicating to folks who are truly gluten intolerant or gluten allergic. If they really care about people, I can't imagine why they would have any problem at all with distinguishing between gluten-removed and gluten-free.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I have been occasionally enjoying Daura, a beer imported from Spain. Recently the large gluten-free specialty store that I go to locally informed me it is a gluten removed beer. The store had testing done and they assured me it was gluten-free. I hope it is, I hate the sorghum alternatives. I do get quite a buzz with one bottle, possibly there is a diffuse effect for me, but no GI, headache, or joint pain.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Helen

    Posted

    I have had Omission beer - both varieties - multiple times. I enjoy the taste as superior to most gluten-free beers, especially the big manufacturer beers. I am diagnosed celiac, but have been gluten-free since 2001. I would suggest that sensitivity is an individual matter. I like having the choice and would hope that this choice that works for me will always be available.

    Keep in mind that even naturally gluten-free products may be gluten contaminated if not processed in a gluten-free environment. Every time you add a new product to your diet you have to be careful that it is the only new item. Then you can be sure what it is what you are reacting to - or hopefully not reacting to.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Laura

    Posted

    I am a diagnosed celiac and I have never had a problem with Omission. I always check the batch number in the grocery store before I purchase and I have never gotten a PPM number greater than 11. However, I understand that we all have different thresholds for a reaction and I don't think the product should be marked "Gluten Free" if people are having reactions to it.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Jared M.

    Posted

    Well, clearly some of you still have a little to learn about being a celiac. If you didn't take the time to look into the company and how it brews the beer, then shame on you. It was very widely reported that this beer is brewed from barley just like Estrella Damm Daura.

     

    When I first heard of Omission, I did my homework. I went to their website and read about the process. I knew full well what I was getting into when I tried the beer. Luckily for me, I'm one of the celiacs that doesn't have a reaction to the beer. So I will continue to drink it no matter how it is labeled.

     

    I also found on their website that they do not market it as gluten-free in the U.S. So I'm perplexed as to why someone would call them a corporate liar. And one other very important thing I want to point out from my investigation of Omission: The brewmaster's wife is a celiac!!! Why would he be using "tactics" to deceive people with the same illness as his wife?

     

    I'm going to guess here that you found the beer on a gluten-free shelf at a store. Well, that grocer is who lied to you, not Craft Brew Alliance. You should direct your anger at that wonderfully responsible corporation, Whole Foods Market - a company with a very long laundry list of deceitful tactics.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Brian

    Posted

    My wife tried the Prairie Path beer from Two Brothers in Illinois. It's a very good beer and is labeled as "Crafted to Remove Gluten." They have a big article on their website that talks about the testing that was done to certify the low levels of gluten even though it is made with barley. Unfortunately, the beer did not make her feel well. The first time she had it a headache developed, but it was unclear whether it was the beer or cross contamination at the restaurant. We bought the beer at home (since she liked it so much), and the headache occurred a second time along with nausea, her surefire gluten symptoms.

     

    And so we are definitely in favor of the government preventing these breweries from labeling their product as "gluten-free". Though the currently available tests may not show the gluten, it apparently can still cause issues for celiacs.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Uncle Bruce

    Posted

    Parts per Million. So one Omission gives you, say, 10ppm. What does three beers then give you? 30 parts, diluted in three volumes of beer. Parts is parts. Enough parts, and we have celiac distress.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I love Omission's pale ale and drink it often. My gluten intolerant friend has a reaction to it, so he sticks to rum and others if he's looking to drink alcohol. Neither of us are diagnosed celiac. However, I do think there are a lot of people who think they have gluten sensitivity or intolerance when really their main sensitivity might be something like yeast.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Cindy

    Posted

    I drank Omission beer all weekend without any reaction whatsoever. I do not understand the difference in labeling when as mentioned in your article the government and most of Europe labels gluten-free when it has less than 20pp million and this is accepted everywhere in Europe which has a much higher population than the US. Also, we now know that the distilling process removes gluten from whiskey etc. which makes it acceptable for celiacs. No it is not labeled gluten-free, however, I do not believe that Craft Beers is trying to pull a "fast one" as one of the previous writers suggested. The CEO of the company is celiac, so you don't think he has a concern? I personally am excited to have new choices and if it meets the standards, label it as such. The company is open to feedback and questions at glutenfreeterry@omissionbeer.com.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Gryphon

    Posted

    Parts per Million. So one Omission gives you, say, 10ppm. What does three beers then give you? 30 parts, diluted in three volumes of beer. Parts is parts. Enough parts, and we have celiac distress.

    Yes, but a stomach can only hold so much - the point of the 20ppm standard is that at this level, you couldn't realistically get enough gluten in your system at one time to cause any kind of reaction. In the case of this beer, you'd probably die from alcohol poisoning before you'd get a significant amount of gluten in your system.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites



    Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

    Guest
    You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoticons maximum are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Popular Contributors

  • Ads by Google:

  • Who's Online   6 Members, 0 Anonymous, 362 Guests (See full list)

  • Related Articles

    admin

    The Sprue-Nik Press, published by the Tri-County Celiac Sprue Support Group, a chapter of CSA/USA, Inc. serving southeastern Michigan, Volume 7, Number 5, July/August 1998. Dr. Peter Ernst is Senior Scientist at the Dept. of Pediatrics, University of Texas Medical Branch. He is the son of Canadian Celiac Association (CCA) co-founder Kay Ernst, and is a celiac himself.
    During Dr. Ernst’s talk, he indicated his philosophy toward celiac disease which is, "Don’t exclude anything if it is unnecessary." As a result he made three assertions which may provoke no major objection from Canadian celiacs but are controversial among US celiacs. Dr. Ernst’s first assertion is that it is almost impossible for gliadins to be in distilled products. For instance, many people avoid distilled vinegar; Dr. Ernst believes this is almost certainly unnecessary. In his mind, there is no "celiac" problem regardless of anecdotal evidence to the contrary. [This is a view shared by the CCA and many experts, including USDA grain expert Donald Kasarda. However, many US celiac organizations, including our support group and CSA/USA, recommend against the use of distilled products unless the source is anon-gluten grain. Each celiac must make their own decision regarding the use of distilled products.—ed.]

    admin
    This article originally appeared in the Summer 2002 edition of Celiac.coms Scott-Free newsletter.

    On June 2, 2002, hundreds of researchers traveled from all over the world to Paris, France, in order to hear the latest scientific reports on celiac disease research and to present results from their own investigations. Over the course of three days, scientists presented dozens of reports, and displayed over a hundred posters covering all aspects of celiac disease, from laboratory research on the microbiologic aspects of the disease, to quality of life issues in patients who are on the gluten-free diet.
    There were so many exciting reports presented at the conference, and the following describes the research findings from these new reports concerning the screening and clinical presentation of celiac disease, osteoporosis and osteopathy and neurological conditions.
    SCREENING ISSUES IN CELIAC DISEASE
    In order to understand how best to screen populations for celiac disease, it is important to know how celiac disease affects a portion of the population, and how it compares to similar populations in other countries.
    Mayo Clinic Retrospective Study
    Dr. Joseph Murray from the Mayo Clinic conducted a retrospective study on the population of people living in Olmsted County, Minnesota. This county has kept medical records on all of its residents for over 100 years. Dr. Murray looked at the medical records to determine which residents were diagnosed with celiac disease from 1950 to 2001. He found 82 cases of celiac disease, with 58 in females and 24 in males. The average age of diagnosis was 45. Pediatric diagnoses of celiac disease during this time period were extremely rare.
    Dr. Murray found that while the diagnosis rate of dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) remained constant over the 51 year period, the diagnosis rate of celiac disease increased from 0.8 to 9.4 per 100,000 people. He also noted that over time, adults with celiac disease were less likely to present diarrhea and weight loss as symptoms. Encouragingly, he determined that the average life expectancy for a diagnosed celiac in this community was no less than that of the normal population, despite the fact that celiac disease was often diagnosed later in life.
    What does this mean?
    The celiac disease diagnosis rate in this county is much lower than the actual incidence rates that have been reported in other studies; however, that rate has greatly increased over the past 51 years. It is also noteworthy that so few children were diagnosed with celiac disease. The analysis highlights interesting and useful information about the presentation of celiac disease in adults, and about the potential life expectancy for people with celiac disease who are diagnosed later in life.
    United States and Europe Compared
    Dr. Carlo Catassi of Ancona, Italy is currently a visiting researcher at the University of Maryland Celiac Research Center. He presented an analysis of the similarities and differences between the clinical presentations of celiac disease in the United States and Europe.
    Dr. Catassi established that the prevalence of celiac disease in the U.S. and Europe are the same and range between 0.5 to 1.0 percent of the general population. The prevalence in at-risk populations is much higher, ranging between 5 and 10 percent, and the prevalence in people with Type 1 Diabetes is approximately 5 percent in both the U.S. and Europe.
    He found that the typical (symptomatic) cases of celiac disease were less common in the U.S., and that the latent (asymptomatic) cases were much more common. Dr. Catassi stated that these differences could be due to genetic factors (for example, there are more Asians in the United States than in Europe), but are more likely due to environmental factors. He noted that infants born in the U.S. are often breastfed longer than their European counterparts. There is also a lower gluten intake in the first months of life for infants in the U.S. The timing of the introduction of cereals could help explain why many American children have somewhat milder symptoms and a more unusual presentation of the disease.
    What does this mean?
    Dr. Catassis analysis underscores the need to better educate physicians in the U.S. so that they learn to see typically atypical signs of celiac disease in children and adults. He also reinforced the importance of breastfeeding as a protective factor for children with a genetic predisposition to celiac disease, which could also improve the outlook for European children in the future.
    United States Prevalence Research
    Dr. Alessio Fasano presented a poster which outlined his recent findings that are a follow-up to his now famous 1996 blood screening study. The original study found that 1 in 250 Americans had celiac disease. It was performed using anti-gliadin antibodies (AGA), and when a blood sample tested AGA positive it was confirmed using anti-endomysial (EMA) antibody testing.
    Now that human tissue transglutaminase (tTG) testing is available, Dr. Fasano and his colleagues wanted to see if the results of their original study would be different using the tTG test. He and his colleagues tested the negative samples in the original study, and found 10 more positives using the tTG test. Two of these samples were confirmed positive when checked using the AGA antibody test. Dr. Fasano concluded that the original (1996) prevalence estimate of 1 in 250 understated the true prevalence rate, which could actually be greater than 1 in 200 Americans.
    Dr. Michelle Pietzak, a pediatric gastroenterologist at the University of California at Los Angeles, also presented a poster which described the prevalence of celiac disease in Southern California. In a study of 1,094 participants, Dr. Pietzak found that 8% of Hispanics tested positive for celiac disease. The most common symptoms presented by subjects in her study included abdominal pain, diarrhea, constipation, joint pain and chronic fatigue.
    What does this mean?
    It is important to understand that the foundation of all U.S. prevalence research on celiac disease began with the blood donor study performed by Dr. Fasano in 1996. His newly revised findings, which have been supported by at least one other major study, show that the prevalence of celiac disease in the U.S. population is much higher than originally believed, and that it could be greater than 1 in 200 people. Additionally, the California study is one of the first to establish a celiac disease prevalence figure for the Hispanic population in the U.S., and if the 8 percent figure is supported by further research it would indicate that celiac disease significantly affects Hispanic Americans.
    OSTEOPOROSIS AND OSTEOPATHY
    Dr. Julio Bai of Argentina presented important information on a condition that affects many people with celiac disease, and one that is often overlooked by physicians—osteoporosis or osteopathy (its milder form). Both children and adults with celiac disease can have low bone mineral density, and its method of treatment can have important consequences.
    Dr. Bai treats adults with bone loss, and has studied the nature of fractures and bone health in adults with celiac disease. In a case-control study of 78 celiac disease patients, Dr. Bai found that symptomatic patients were more likely to experience bone fractures than the normal population. Interestingly, he also found that patients with latent (asymptomatic) celiac disease had lower fracture rates than those with symptoms, and that the rate was equal to that of the normal population. None of the patients, however, experienced a fracture of the more serious type—in the hip, spine or shoulder, and the fractures tended to occur in their arms, legs, hands and feet.
    The doctor also discussed preliminary evidence which showed that most women with osteopathy and celiac disease who go on a gluten free diet will experience an improvement in bone density, while many men do not. There was, however, no difference found between the fracture rates of men and women.
    Dr. Bai also found that nutritional and metabolic deficiencies in patients with celiac disease and osteopathy might also contribute to fractures by weakening the muscles that surround essential bones. He added that immunological factors could also enhance or inhibit bone rebuilding, and that there is a bone-specific tissue transglutaminase (tTG) that plays a role in this process.
    What does this mean?
    It was certainly good news to hear that most people with low bone density due to celiac disease can reverse the damaging process, and if celiac-related fractures do occur they tend to be of the less serious type. Additionally, it was interesting to learn just how important a role muscle health plays in preventing celiac-related fractures.
    Osteopathy in Children
    Dr. Mora, an Italian researcher, presented data on osteopathy in children with celiac disease. His results indicate that a gluten-free diet can improve bone mass, and the effect is maintained even after 10 years. He also added that a gluten-free diet improved the overall bone metabolism of the children, and that the diet alone could cure their osteopathy.
    Osteopenia and Osteoporosis: Conditions Related to Celiac Disease
    In a chart prepared by Dr. David Sanders of the United Kingdom, data on 674 patients, 243 with osteoporosis and 431 with osteopenia, were presented. He found 10 cases of celiac disease among a mostly female population that had an average age of 53. In all ten cases, patients either had a history of iron-deficient anemia or gastrointestinal symptoms. He concluded that all patients with osteopenia or osteoporosis and a history of anemia or gastrointestinal symptoms should be screened for celiac disease.
    What does this mean?
    Dr. Sanders has identified a subset of people with osteoporosis and osteopenia that should be screened for celiac disease—those who have been anemic or have gastrointestinal symptoms. This helps physicians know when to refer patients for celiac disease screening.
    NEUROLOGICAL SYMPTOMS
    Dr. Marios Hadjivassiliou of the United Kingdom presented data on neurological symptoms and gluten sensitivity. In an eight-year study, Dr. Hadjivassiliou screened people who had neurological symptoms of unknown origin using the anti-gliadin antibody (AGA) test. He found that 57 percent of these patients had antibodies present in their blood, compared to 12 percent of healthy controls or 5 percent of patients with a neurological condition of known origin.
    From this group, he studied 158 patients with gluten sensitivity and neurological conditions of unknown origin (only 33 percent of these patients had any gastrointestinal symptoms). The most common neurological conditions in this group were ataxia, peripheral neuropathies, myopathy, and encephalopathy (very severe headache). Less common were stiff person syndrome, myelopathy and neuromyotonia.
    He noted that ataxia is not a result of vitamin deficiencies, but is instead an immune-mediated condition. Patients with ataxia have unique antibodies that are not found in patients with celiac disease. Dr. Hadjivassiliou felt that up to 30 percent of idiopathic neuropathies could be gluten-related, and that there is preliminary evidence which indicates that a gluten-free diet is helpful in cases of neuropathy and ataxia.
    What does this mean?
    It is interesting to note that Dr. Hadjivassiliou has studied gluten sensitivity and not celiac disease. The test used in this study is not specific enough to identify people who were likely to have celiac disease. However, his finding that the gluten-free diet may be helpful in people with certain types of neuropathy and ataxia opens the door for further research on these conditions in people with celiac disease.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 09/11/2009 - When is a beer not a beer? When it's gluten-free. Until now.
    Beer perpetually hovers near the top of most celiac lists of things they'd love to have if they could. Until recently, the regulation of labels for beer, wine and spirits fell to a little known government agency called the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau.
    Because their regulations relied on the Federal Alcohol Administration Act of 1935, which defined beer as a beverage brewed from malted barley and other grains, gluten-free beers did not meet the strict definition, and could not therefore be labeled as 'gluten-free beer,' as no such standard existed.
    That situation has changed, and the Food and Drug Administration is now charged with the regulation of beer labels. Because of this, gluten-free beer can now be labeled 'gluten-free beer' instead of 'sorghum beer' or 'beer made without wheat or barley', or some such silliness.
    That's good news for the nation's estimated two million sufferers of celiac disease, and the many, many more who are gluten intolerant. For these folks, consuming any kind of product containing wheat, rye or barley can cause chronic diarrhea, arthritis, bone loss and a raft of other symptoms.
    In people with celiac disease, the immune system reacts to gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye and barley, which causes inflammation in their gut and interfers with the absorption of nutrients.
    All traditional beers are brewed with malted barley and contain gluten. However, specialty micro brewers began making beer from malted sorghum, an African grain, and sometimes rice. Anheuser-Busch followed later with its own sorghum beer. Beers brewed with sorghum and rice are gluten free, which is great for celiacs, but was not in line with the Federal Alcohol Administration Act of 1935, which defines beer as a beverage brewed from malted barley and other grains.
    So even though it looked, smelled and tasted like beer, the amber, foamy and distinctly beer-like beverage did not count as beer under the rules. Which is why last July 7, 2008, the FDA and TTB agreed that FDA would take over regulation.
    The FDAs Guidance for Industry covers all non-barley beers. So, in a great development for all of the celiac and gluten-intolerant folks out there, these beers can now officially be labeled gluten-free once they've been tested and confirmed by FDA.
    The guidelines give brewers of gluten-free beers until Jan. 1, 2012, to begin adding nutrition labels to their beverages, including a declaration of major food allergens, wheat.
    Up until now, people with celiac disease and gluten intolerance could not be sure that their gluten-free beer was actually safe and gluten-free. Now FDA regulations have established a standard.
    According to Elaine Monarch, executive director of the Celiac Disease Foundation, accurate labels will provide a measure of assurance for celiacs, and possibly make it easier for European gluten-free beverages to enter the market.
    Gluten-free beer is a small, but steadily growing sector of the beer market, with a present market share of under 0.1%, according to Paul Gatza of the Brewers Association in Boulder, Colorado. Still, growth for some brands runs upward of 35% per year. The biggest gluten-free beer players are Anheuser-Busch, which makes Red Bridge, Lakefront Brewery's New Grist, and Bard's Tail.
     


  • Recent Articles

    Tammy Rhodes
    Celiac.com 04/24/2018 - Did you know in 2017 alone, the United States had OVER TENS OF THOUSANDS of people evacuate their homes due to natural disasters such as fires, floods, hurricanes, tornadoes and tsunamis? Most evacuation sites are not equipped to feed your family the safe gluten free foods that are required to stay healthy.  Are you prepared in case of an emergency? Do you have your Gluten Free Emergency Food Bag ready to grab and go?  
    I have already lived through two natural disasters. Neither of which I ever want to experience again, but they taught me a very valuable lesson, which is why I created a Gluten Free Emergency Food Bag (see link below). Here’s my story. If you’ve ever lived in or visited the Los Angeles area, you’re probably familiar with the Santa Ana winds and how bitter sweet they are. Sweet for cleaning the air and leaving the skies a brilliant crystal blue, and bitter for the power outages and potential brush fires that might ensue.  It was one of those bitter nights where the Santa Ana winds were howling, and we had subsequently lost our power. We had to drive over an hour just to find a restaurant so we could eat dinner. I remember vividly seeing the glow of a brush fire on the upper hillside of the San Gabriel Mountains, a good distance from our neighborhood. I really didn’t think much of it, given that it seemed so far from where we lived, and I was hungry! After we ate, we headed back home to a very dark house and called it a night. 
    That’s where the story takes a dangerous turn….about 3:15am. I awoke to the TV blaring loudly, along with the lights shining brightly. Our power was back on! I proceeded to walk throughout the house turning everything off at exactly the same time our neighbor, who was told to evacuate our street, saw me through our window, assuming I knew that our hillside was ablaze with flames. Flames that were shooting 50 feet into the air. I went back to bed and fell fast asleep. The fire department was assured we had left because our house was dark and quiet again. Two hours had passed.  I suddenly awoke to screams coming from a family member yelling, “fire, fire, fire”! Flames were shooting straight up into the sky, just blocks from our house. We lived on a private drive with only one way in and one way out.  The entrance to our street was full of smoke and the fire fighters were doing their best to save our neighbors homes. We literally had enough time to grab our dogs, pile into the car, and speed to safety. As we were coming down our street, fire trucks passed us with sirens blaring, and I wondered if I would ever see my house and our possessions ever again. Where do we go? Who do we turn to? Are shelters a safe option? 
    When our daughter was almost three years old, we left the West Coast and relocated to Northern Illinois. A place where severe weather is a common occurrence. Since the age of two, I noticed that my daughter appeared gaunt, had an incredibly distended belly, along with gas, stomach pain, low weight, slow growth, unusual looking stool, and a dislike for pizza, hotdog buns, crackers, Toast, etc. The phone call from our doctor overwhelmed me.  She was diagnosed with Celiac Disease. I broke down into tears sobbing. What am I going to feed my child? Gluten is everywhere.
    After being scoped at Children's Hospital of Chicago, and my daughters Celiac Disease officially confirmed, I worried about her getting all the nutrients her under nourished body so desperately needed. I already knew she had a peanut allergy from blood tests, but just assumed she would be safe with other nuts. I was so horribly wrong. After feeding her a small bite of a pistachio, which she immediately spit out, nuts would become her enemy. Her anaphylactic reaction came within minutes of taking a bite of that pistachio. She was complaining of horrible stomach cramps when the vomiting set in. She then went limp and starting welting. We called 911.
    Now we never leave home without our Epipens and our gluten free food supplies. We analyze every food label. We are hyper vigilant about cross contamination. We are constantly looking for welts and praying for no stomach pain. We are always prepared and on guard. It's just what we do now. Anything to protect our child, our love...like so many other parents out there have to do every moment of ever day!  
    Then, my second brush with a natural disaster happened, without any notice, leaving us once again scrambling to find a safe place to shelter. It was a warm and muggy summer morning, and my husband was away on a business trip leaving my young daughter and me to enjoy our summer day. Our Severe Weather Alert Radio was going off, again, as I continued getting our daughter ready for gymnastics.  Having gotten used to the (what seemed to be daily) “Severe Thunderstorm warning,” I didn’t pay much attention to it. I continued downstairs with my daughter and our dog, when I caught a glimpse out the window of an incredibly black looking cloud. By the time I got downstairs, I saw the cover to our grill literally shoot straight up into the air. Because we didn’t have a fenced in yard, I quickly ran outside and chased the cover, when subsequently, I saw my neighbor’s lawn furniture blow pass me. I quickly realized I made a big mistake going outside. As I ran back inside, I heard debris hitting the front of our home.  Our dog was the first one to the basement door! As we sat huddled in the dark corner of our basement, I was once again thinking where are we going to go if our house is destroyed. I was not prepared, and I should have been. I should have learned my lesson the first time. Once the storm passed, we quickly realized we were without power and most of our trees were destroyed. We were lucky that our house had minimal damage, but that wasn’t true for most of the area surrounding us.  We were without power for five days. We lost most of our food - our gluten free food.
    That is when I knew we had to be prepared. No more winging it. We couldn’t take a chance like that ever again. We were “lucky” one too many times. We were very fortunate that we did not lose our home to the Los Angeles wildfire, and only had minimal damage from the severe storm which hit our home in Illinois.
      
    In 2017 alone, FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency) had 137 natural disasters declared within the United States. According to FEMA, around 50% of the United States population isn’t prepared for a natural disaster. These disasters can happen anywhere, anytime and some without notice. It’s hard enough being a parent, let alone being a parent of a gluten free family member. Now, add a natural disaster on top of that. Are you prepared?
    You can find my Gluten Free Emergency Food Bags and other useful products at www.allergynavigator.com.  

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/23/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to learn whether celiac disease patients commonly suffer cognitive impairment at the time they are diagnosed, and to compare their cognitive performance with non-celiac subjects with similar chronic symptoms and to a group of healthy control subjects.
    The research team included G Longarini, P Richly, MP Temprano, AF Costa, H Vázquez, ML Moreno, S Niveloni, P López, E Smecuol, R Mazure, A González, E Mauriño, and JC Bai. They are variously associated with the Small Bowel Section, Department of Medicine, Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo Gastroenterology Hospital; Neurocience Cognitive and Traslational Institute (INECO), Favaloro Fundation, CONICET, Buenos Aires; the Brain Health Center (CESAL), Quilmes, Argentina; the Research Council, MSAL, CABA; and with the Research Institute, School of Medicine, Universidad del Salvador.
    The team enrolled fifty adults with symptoms and indications of celiac disease in a prospective cohort without regard to the final diagnosis.  At baseline, all individuals underwent cognitive functional and psychological evaluation. The team then compared celiac disease patients with subjects without celiac disease, and with healthy controls matched by sex, age, and education.
    Celiac disease patients had similar cognitive performance and anxiety, but no significant differences in depression scores compared with disease controls.
    A total of thirty-three subjects were diagnosed with celiac disease. Compared with the 26 healthy control subjects, the 17 celiac disease subjects, and the 17 disease control subjects, who mostly had irritable bowel syndrome, showed impaired cognitive performance (P=0.02 and P=0.04, respectively), functional impairment (P<0.01), and higher depression (P<0.01). 
    From their data, the team noted that any abnormal cognitive functions they saw in adults with newly diagnosed celiac disease did not seem not to be a result of the disease itself. 
    Their results indicate that cognitive dysfunction in celiac patients could be related to long-term symptoms from chronic disease, in general.
    Source:
    J Clin Gastroenterol. 2018 Mar 1. doi: 10.1097/MCG.0000000000001018.

    Connie Sarros
    Celiac.com 04/21/2018 - Dear Friends and Readers,
    I have been writing articles for Scott Adams since the 2002 Summer Issue of the Scott-Free Press. The Scott-Free Press evolved into the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. I felt honored when Scott asked me ten years ago to contribute to his quarterly journal and it's been a privilege to write articles for his publication ever since.
    Due to personal health reasons and restrictions, I find that I need to retire. My husband and I can no longer travel the country speaking at conferences and to support groups (which we dearly loved to do) nor can I commit to writing more books, articles, or menus. Consequently, I will no longer be contributing articles to the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. 
    My following books will still be available at Amazon.com:
    Gluten-free Cooking for Dummies Student's Vegetarian Cookbook for Dummies Wheat-free Gluten-free Dessert Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Reduced Calorie Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Cookbook for Kids and Busy Adults (revised version) My first book was published in 1996. My journey since then has been incredible. I have met so many in the celiac community and I feel blessed to be able to call you friends. Many of you have told me that I helped to change your life – let me assure you that your kind words, your phone calls, your thoughtful notes, and your feedback throughout the years have had a vital impact on my life, too. Thank you for all of your support through these years.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/20/2018 - A digital media company and a label data company are teaming up to help major manufacturers target, reach and convert their desired shoppers based on dietary needs, such as gluten-free diet. The deal could bring synergy in emerging markets such as the gluten-free and allergen-free markets, which represent major growth sectors in the global food industry. 
    Under the deal, personalized digital media company Catalina will be joining forces with Label Insight. Catalina uses consumer purchases data to target shoppers on a personal base, while Label Insight works with major companies like Kellogg, Betty Crocker, and Pepsi to provide insight on food label data to government, retailers, manufacturers and app developers.
    "Brands with very specific product benefits, gluten-free for example, require precise targeting to efficiently reach and convert their desired shoppers,” says Todd Morris, President of Catalina's Go-to-Market organization, adding that “Catalina offers the only purchase-based targeting solution with this capability.” 
    Label Insight’s clients include food and beverage giants such as Unilever, Ben & Jerry's, Lipton and Hellman’s. Label Insight technology has helped the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) build the sector’s very first scientifically accurate database of food ingredients, health attributes and claims.
    Morris says the joint partnership will allow Catalina to “enhance our dataset and further increase our ability to target shoppers who are currently buying - or have shown intent to buy - in these emerging categories,” including gluten-free, allergen-free, and other free-from foods.
    The deal will likely make for easier, more precise targeting of goods to consumers, and thus provide benefits for manufacturers and retailers looking to better serve their retail food customers, especially in specialty areas like gluten-free and allergen-free foods.
    Source:
    fdfworld.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/19/2018 - Previous genome and linkage studies indicate the existence of a new disease triggering mechanism that involves amino acid metabolism and nutrient sensing signaling pathways. In an effort to determine if amino acids might play a role in the development of celiac disease, a team of researchers recently set out to investigate if plasma amino acid levels differed among children with celiac disease compared with a control group.
     
    The research team included Åsa Torinsson Naluai, Ladan Saadat Vafa, Audur H. Gudjonsdottir, Henrik Arnell, Lars Browaldh, and Daniel Agardh. They are variously affiliated with the Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Karolinska University Hospital and Division of Pediatrics, CLINTEC, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institute, Sodersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Diabetes & Celiac Disease Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; and with the Nathan S Kline Institute in the U.S.A.
    First, the team used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS) to analyze amino acid levels in fasting plasma samples from 141 children with celiac disease and 129 non-celiac disease controls. They then crafted a general linear model using age and experimental effects as covariates to compare amino acid levels between children with celiac disease and non-celiac control subjects.
    Compared with the control group, seven out of twenty-three children with celiac disease showed elevated levels of the the following amino acids: tryptophan; taurine; glutamic acid; proline; ornithine; alanine; and methionine.
    The significance of the individual amino acids do not survive multiple correction, however, multivariate analyses of the amino acid profile showed significantly altered amino acid levels in children with celiac disease overall and after correction for age, sex and experimental effects.
    This study shows that amino acids can influence inflammation and may play a role in the development of celiac disease.
    Source:
    PLoS One. 2018; 13(3): e0193764. doi: & 10.1371/journal.pone.0193764