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    Jefferson Adams
    Hillary Clinton Celebrates 65th Birthday with Gluten-free Cake
    Celiac.com 11/23/2012 - In the latest gluten-free celebrity news, none other than Secretary of State Hillary Clinton celebrated her 65th birthday (that's right, she's now officially a senior citizen) with a gluten-free birthday cake.
    Clinton celebrated her birthday last weekend at a fancy inn in rural Connecticut inn with Bill, Chelsea, and Chelsea's husband, Marc before catching a flight to Algeria to address the crisis in neighboring Mali, according to a report in the New York Post. According to the Post's sources, Bill and Hillary stayed up late playing cards in the lobby.
    Clinton's birthday cake was not only gluten-free, but also vegan, as husband Bill has been a vegan for a few years now. Daughter Chelsea's 2010 wedding also featured a gluten-free cake.

    Jefferson Adams
    Gluten-free Pizza Sets Record for World's Largest Pie
    Celiac.com 01/11/2013 - In case you were wondering just how big gluten-free pizza has become, the answer is: Big. Very big. World-record big.
    Consider the recent news from Italy, where five chefs joined forces to craft the world's largest pizza, a pizza which also happens to be gluten-free.
    The pie shattered the previous world record for largest pizza ever baked, and set a new record for world's largest gluten-free pizza.
    To make the pizza, the chefs used 19,800 pounds of Schar gluten-free flour, 2,480 gallons of water, 10,000 pounds of tomato sauce, 8,800 pounds of mozzarella cheese, 1,488 pounds of margarine, 551 pounds of rock salt, 275 pounds of parmesan cheese, 220 pounds of lettuce and 55 pounds of vinegar, and 298 gallons of yeast.
    The final product required two full days of cooking to complete. It was 131-feet across, and topped the scales at a whopping 51,257 pounds.
    According to the Guinness World Records, the previous record for the largest circular pizza ever baked belonged to a pie made in Norwood, South Africa by Norwood Hypermarket on December 8, 1990. That pizza weighed 26,883 pounds. It measured 122 feet, 8 inches in diameter, weighed 26,883 pounds, and contained 9,920 pounds of flour, 3,960 pounds of cheese, 1,763 pounds of mushrooms, 1,984 pounds of tomato puree, and 1,984 pounds of chopped tomatoes.
    The Italian cooking team was headed by Dovilio Nardi, who had previously helped to create an Italian pizza chain that catered toward people with celiac disease. The event was organized by Dr. Schar, a company that produces gluten-free food.
    Source:
    Business Wire

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 01/25/2013 - Faced with calls to accommodate rising numbers of gluten-free parishioners, more Christian churches and are increasingly offering a gluten-free option for those rising numbers of gluten-free members who seek to take communion.
    A number of churches in the US and the UK have already taken measures to accommodate gluten-free members with gluten-free and low-gluten offerings.
    And while there is still a bit of wrangling in the Catholic church in the US about the acceptable gluten-content of communion wafers, it looks like more traditional Catholic and Anglican churches in Australia are now joining ranks in offering a gluten-free communion option for their parishioners.
    According to Mike Grieger, whose Australian Church Resources organization sells gluten-free and low-gluten altar bread to more than 2000 churches of different denominations, the trend is changing the way churches practice communion.
    Generally, for Protestants, offering gluten-free bread for communion seems to pose little, if any, religious difficulty, as the bread and the wine are regarded as mere symbols of the body and blood of Christ.
    Because Roman Catholics believe that the bread and wine, with the priest's blessing, actually become transformed into the savior's body and blood, the adoption of completely gluten-free offerings has caused issues.
    That is because church doctrine requires bread made from unleavened wheat, as they believe Jesus used at the Last Supper.
    To address the issue, nuns at the Benedictine Sisters of Perpetual Adoration in Clyde, Missouri have created an extremely low-gluten wafer that is now being offered by numerous Catholic churches.
    It appears that official policy in the Catholic church can differ across geographic regions. For example, the Catholic Diocese of Columbus recently said that gluten-free wafers don’t meet Vatican standards because they don’t contain wheat, but that parishioners can still receive full communion by taking the wine.
    However, in Australia, Father Ken Howell, Catholic Dean of St. Stephen's Cathedral in Brisbane, says that gluten-sensitive parishioners could now bring their own gluten-free wafers.
    Meanwhile, more Protestant churches are moving to accommodate not just gluten-sensitivity, but other dietary sensitivities as well. One example is Ashgrove West Uniting Church in Brisbane, which began to offer their congregation bread that gluten-free, nut-free, dairy-free and vegan friendly about a year and a half ago, according to church secretary Julie Hultgren.
    What to you think? Should churches accommodate their gluten-sensitive members with gluten-free communion options? Share your comments below. Meantime, stay tuned to hear the latest in gluten-free trends in communion.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 11/04/2014 - Not long ago, the market for gluten-free products was regarded as a market of specialty products intended for niche shoppers and vendors. That has changed rapidly, as the market has evolved into a bona fide mainstream market serving shoppers with a strong affiliation for gluten-free products.
    The overall market for gluten-free products is currently dominated by North American manufacturers and vendors, followed by their European counterparts. An abundance of new products and steadily rising consumer demand are driving the strong growth in the gluten-free products market.
    A comprehensive new report in the market breaks down the overall market into geographic and products segments. The report is titled “Gluten-Free Products Market by Type (Bakery & Confectionery, Snacks, Breakfast Cereals, Baking Mixes & Flour, and Meat & Poultry Products), Sales Channel (Natural & Conventional) & Geography - Global Trends & Forecasts to 2019”
    The report divides the gluten-free products market into four geographical segments, North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, and ROW. North America is projected to witness the highest growth rate in the market.
    The report defines and analyzes the market in terms of monetary value, volume, trends, opportunities, burning issues, winning imperatives, and challenges.
    Those interested in the full report can browse 193 market data tables and 32 figures spread through 366 pages and in-depth TOC on "Gluten-Free Products Market by Type (Bakery & Confectionery, Snacks, Breakfast Cereals, Baking Mixes & Flour, and Meat & Poultry Products), Sales Channel (Natural & Conventional) & Geography - Global Trends & Forecasts to 2019".

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    Im the same, I never know what to eat, some food does better than others for me, I went on to make my own soup and Im glad I did, I should do it more often and at least then J know what's going in to it, it wasn't the best first try but I enjoyed it haha
    Thank you for the advice, in the end I went and made my own soup, not great for my first try but it was better than potentially making myself worse, I enjoyed it, I got some vitamains too to take, I was able to find a liquid Vitamain B Complex, the store I went to was helpfull enough to show me what was Gluten Free.   I fealt awful around then, Im feeling like I have more energy now I can actually do things and focus more, Ill keep on like I have been, Im not 100% and still have some B
    Not to mention the fact that (for those using the Nima) the Nima sensor has been known to give false positives. https://www.theverge.com/2019/4/1/18080666/nima-sensor-testing-fda-food-allergy-gluten-peanut-transparency-data https://www.celiac.ca/cca-statement-nima-gluten-sensor/ https://www.allergy-insight.com/nima-is-it-really-96-9-accurate/ https://www.glutenfreewatchdog.org/news/troubling-gluten-testing-data-released-by-nima-but-hold-the-phone/ https://www.glutenfreew
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