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    Scott Adams

    Gluten-Free Boom Presents Opportunities for Retailers--Gluten Intolerance is 10 Times Higher Than Expected

    Celiac.com 02/25/2005 - Move over low-carb and sugar-free! New research shows that the need for a gluten-free diet is 10 times higher than experts originally predicted. Retailers should prepare to meet the needs of this growing niche, say two experts on the gluten-free diet.

    This is the message that Shelley Case, RD and Carol Fenster, Ph.D. will bring to retailers at the Natural Products Expo West trade show on March 17 at the Anaheim Convention Center. Case is a dietitian who counsels gluten-free patients and is the author of Gluten-Free Diet, www.glutenfreediet.ca. Fenster is a chef who develops gluten-free products for manufacturers and is the author of Gluten-Free 101, www.glutenfree101.com.

    This diet is not a fad, they explain, but a medically prescribed avoidance of gluten which is a protein in wheat that is toxic for some people. The two experts will help retailers understand the medical necessity of the gluten-free diet and how stores can stock their shelves and market effectively to gluten-free consumers.

    "Food manufacturers are responding to the need for gluten-free products. According to the Natural Foods Merchandiser, the number of gluten-free products jumped 88% between 2002 and 2003," says Fenster, who has been gluten-free for 15 years. Total food dollars spent on allergies and intolerances––gluten-free products are a part of this––will rise to nearly $4 billion by 2008, she adds.

    People who need gluten-free diets are those with allergies or intolerances to wheat or related grains such as barley, rye, spelt, and possibly oats. Nearly 3 million Americans have celiac disease, an autoimmune form of gluten intolerance in which gluten damages the ability to absorb nutrients. The condition can be fatal if not treated with a gluten-free diet.

    "There is no magic pill or surgery for gluten intolerance," says Case, who has been counseling gluten-free patients for 20 years. "The only treatment is total avoidance of gluten for the rest of ones life. This makes the gluten-free consumer a repeat buyer––and very attractive to retailers."


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  • About Me

    In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease. In 1998 I founded The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore!, and I am the co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    Celiac.com 07/12/2004 - There have been numerous claims that traditional barley-based beers are gluten free or that all beers are gluten free. Unfortunately, the area is very grey and substantiated on technicalities. The purpose of this post is to eliminate the confusion about gluten as it relates to beer. Gluten is an umbrella term used to describe a mixture of individual proteins found in many grains. Celiac disease (celiac sprue or gluten intolerance, gluten sensitivity) is an autoimmune disorder that is triggered by the ingestion of some of these glutens. People with classic celiac disease are intolerant to the gluten proteins found in wheat, barley, rye, spelt and a couple other lesser known grains. All these grains have a relative of the gluten protein. Interestingly, corn, rice and sorghum also have gluten proteins but are not toxic to celiacs. Herein lies one of the fundamental problems; the use of the term gluten intolerance to cover only certain gluten containing grains is confusing for consumers and food manufacturers alike. Unfortunately, it seems that the inertia for using celiac disease and gluten intolerance as synonyms is unstoppable. Therefore, it becomes the responsibility of both consumers and manufacturers to make sure the terms being discussed are defined and understood.
    As this relates to beer, there is a gluten protein found in barley. This protein is known as hordein. Wheat gluten is known as gliadin. Rye gluten is known as secalin. Presently, assay tests (or lab tests) are only commercially available for the testing of gliadin. We are unaware of any tests for hordein or any manufacturer that presently tests for hordein (Note: If you know of anyone that does in fact test specifically for hordein, please let us know). Therefore the idea that a barley based beer can be considered gluten free based upon the lack of testing is very difficult to fathom. It should be understood that a company using an assay test for gliadin to test for hordein will not return accurate results.
    There has been widespread speculation that the brewing process eliminates these hordein proteins making all beers gluten-free. Although commercial assay tests for hordein are not available there is conclusive evidence that the brewing process does not degrade hordein to non-toxic levels. A research study in Australia on improving beer haze shows that hordein is still present in beer after the brewing process (http://www.regional.org.au/au/abts/1999/sheehan.htm). Therefore, claims that hordein or gluten is destroyed in the brewing process is unsubstantiated and clearly, based upon the Australian research, is highly questionable.
    Based upon the continuous claims by beer companies that beers are gluten free, it is clear that the issue is misunderstood and, as always, it is up to the consumer to educate them on the facts. Hopefully, the information provided here will give consumers and manufacturers alike the ability to discuss these gluten issues intelligently and effectively.
    About the author: Kevin Seplowitz is the President and Co-founder of the Bards Tale Research Company, LLC and organization that researches the correlations between nutrition, diet, and autoimmune disorders. Bards Tale Research owns and operates Bards Tale Beer Company, LLC (www.bardsbeer.com) a company that develops commercial gluten-free beers. Mr. Seplowitz is a diagnosed Celiac.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 09/12/2013 - The most recent industry report by Research and Markets offers a comprehensive analysis of key players in the gluten-free product industry, major gluten-free product types and their sales channels, with commentary on developments and trends.
    The report also provides a detailed analysis on various phases of numerous aspects of the gluten-free products industry, along with the competitive strategies favored by major industry players.
    Among the reports insights: As large supermarkets and mass retailers offer more gluten-free products, gluten-free sales by health and natural food stores are declining.
    Over the last ten years, as millions of Americans have stopped consuming products containing gluten from wheat, barley, or rye, the market for gluten-free foods and other products has shifted, and many products once regarded as specialty or niche products are now regarded as regular grocery items.
    The report projects global gluten-free product market to reach $6.2 billion at a CAGR of 10.2% by 2018. The report also provides market details and analysis for North America, now the largest market for gluten-free products, and for Europe, which is expected to show significant growth in the market in the near future.
    Some of that growth is attributed to a steady stream of new gluten-free products in the market, offering additional nutrition, new ingredients or flavors.
    The also report projects increased demand countries such as U.K., Italy, U.S., Spain, Germany, Australia, Brazil, Canada, and India, among others.
    The full report is available for purchase at: Gluten-Free Products Market By Type (Bakery & Confectionery, Snacks, Breakfast Cereals, Baking Mixes & Flour, Meat & Poultry Products), Sales Channel (Natural & Conventional) & Geography — Global Trends & Forecasts To 2018

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 09/27/2013 - Will Korea become the next player in gluten-free food production?
    In addition to rapidly expanding international demand for gluten-free products, Koreans concerned about ailments, such as celiac disease, seen as arising from a western diet, seem to be priming the spread of gluten-free and wheat-free trends to the Korean market.
    This May, the Korean Society for Food Engineering organized a the country's first gluten-free product symposium.
    Two months earlier, in March, major food service company OURHOME launched three varieties of gluten-free pasta. Another company, ORGA Whole Foods, an eco-friendly groceries business, currently sells six imported, gluten-free products.
    Gluten-free products are increasingly found in department stores, and Shinsegae Department Store’s bakery might be jumping into the gluten-free baked goods market in the near future.
    Though the bakery does not produce or carry gluten-free goods at the moment, Shinsegae Department Store bakery buyer Cho Chang-hee said, “With increasingly info-savvy, health- and diet-conscious consumers giving gradual rise to the need for gluten-free products we have future plans to develop such goods.”
    All of this signals the potential for the growth of the market for gluten-free and wheat-free, food.
    The Korean Society of Natural Medicine president Seo Jae-gul also pinpoints a Western diet as one of the reasons behind the gluten-free diet.
    Seo, chief doctor at Pomona Clinic, feels that western diet, and the consumption of gluten, in particular, act as contributing factors to the increase in autoimmune diseases like type 1 diabetes and lupus. Seo encourages a gluten-free diet any of his patients diagnosed with such illnesses.
    OURHOME product manager Jung Soon-ah says that interest in gluten-free foods has grown from nearly zero, and is rapidly rising. Until recently, in order to obtain gluten-free foods, Korean consumers had to purchase them from overseas sites and other specialty shops.
    Jung predicts that current “well-being” and “healing” trends will further spur the growth of Korea’s gluten-free market.
    Source:
    http://www.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=20130816000415  

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/07/2014 - Emmy-winning actor, Dan Bucatinsky, best known to his fans for playing journalist James Novak on the popular ABC drama "Scandal," just shared a little dietary secret.
    For more than ten years, Bucatinsky has lived with celiac disease, and relied on a strict gluten-free diet to remain healthy, and to thrive in his profession.
    Before the busy actor/writer realized that his eating habits and diet were making him sick, he says he had gotten used to not feeling great after every meal. He had grown used to suffering stomach cramps, and he simply ignored his own distress.
    In a phone interview with Healthy Hollywood, Bucatinsky explained how he was diagnosed with celiac disease right after his father's death.
    Even though he was overwhelmed at first with all of the hidden gluten in so many grocery items, Bucatinsky rose to the occasion and took action.
    "Once I knew that I had celiac disease, even if I didn’t feel any symptoms, I knew that inside my body was an autoimmune disease that had to be treated and I cleaned the gluten right out of my diet.”
    Source:
    Access Hollywood

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    This disease is like a chameleon always changing, in regards to the above issues, I have my list of NO foods I can not eat anymore, I became allergic to Corn and whey, and ended up with various intolerances/sensitivities from peanuts, lactose, soy, etc. I also got other AI issues like Ulcerative Colitis, which flares to gluten, spices, and sugars/carbs. I ended up with gluten ataxia in which my immune system will also attack my brain and nervous system. It as taken over 6 years gain some feeling
    Hi Trailblazer, No one can say for sure what will happen, but we can make some guesses.   Celiac disease can affect people in many different ways, and there is no guarantee how it will affect a person. One of the problems untreated celiac disease can cause is malabsorption of nutrients.  This can cause stunted growth and poor development of teeth and bone and brain.  Ongoing consumption of gluten by a celiac can result in continual inflammation in the GI system.  This can cause additio
    I do not have DH....but from what other members have said, Dapsone works.  There are some very serious side effects.  Most members try to rely on the gluten-free diet long term.  It is your best defense!  However, they must be very strict.  Most do not eat out and they avoid even processed gluten-free foods.  They tend to experiment once the DH resolves.  But it can take months to years for the antibodies to work their way out of the skin. Browse through the DH section for valuable tips (li
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