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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/24/2018

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    Gluten-free Communion Wafers Not Holy, Says Catholic Diocese in Ohio


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 08/09/2012 - Among many gluten-free catholics, there's been a good deal of excitement lately about low-gluten and gluten-free communion wafers for Mass in the Catholic church.


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    Photo: CC--fradaveccsHowever, much of that excitement seems to have been misplaced, at least in Ohio. That's because the Catholic Diocese of Columbus recently said that gluten-free wafers don’t meet Vatican standards because they don’t contain wheat.

    For Catholics, consecrated bread and wine are the literal body and blood of Jesus, and the sacrament of Holy Eucharist is “the heart and the summit of the Church’s life,” according to its catechism.

    Because Jesus ate wheat bread with his apostles before his Crucifixion, church law requires the host to be wheat and only wheat, said Deacon Martin Davies, director of the Office for Divine Worship at the Diocese of Columbus. Without wheat, the wafers cannot be consecrated and used in Mass, so no gluten-free wafers.

    In 1995, the Vatican said low-gluten hosts are valid if they hold enough gluten to make bread. Worshippers wanting the low-gluten option were required to present a medical certificate and obtain a bishop’s approval.

    The policy was loosened in 2003 to eliminate the medical-certificate requirement and to allow pastors to grant approval. The Vatican also said that Catholics with celiac disease could receive Communion via wine only.

    However, for faithful catholics with celiac disease and gluten intolerance who want to participate more fully, the low-gluten version, which some say tastes terrible, remains the only communion wafer option.

    U.S. Catholic bishops have approved two manufacturers of low-gluten wafers. One is the Benedictine Sisters of Perpetual Adoration in Missouri; the order’s website says it has provided hosts for more than 2,000 celiac sufferers. The other is Parish Crossroads in Indiana, which provides low-gluten hosts made in Germany.

    The low-gluten wafers made by the Benedictine Sisters contain less than 100 parts per million, says Mary Kay Sharrett, a clinical dietitian at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. She said the amount of gluten in one of the hosts is 0.004 milligrams and that researchers have found it takes about 10 milligrams per day to start a reaction.

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has proposed a rule that says products could be labeled gluten-free if the gluten content is less than 20 parts per million.

    Source:


    Image Caption: Photo: CC--fradaveccs
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    Guest Sandra

    Posted

    The researchers are obviously not talking about those Celiacs for whom even a crumb can cause horrible pain and diarrhea. Even worse, the silent damage that is done to the body even without having a noticeable "reaction". Once again, the Catholic Church is showing extreme lack of compassion for its parishioners in favor of archaic dogma.

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    Guest Elizabeth D

    Posted

    This is a pretty good article on this topic. The low-gluten hosts from the Benedictine Sisters have become a common presence in the parishes near me. Some parishes order their own, and some celiac parishioners buy their own low-gluten hosts and bring a host to church to give to the priest before Mass, usually in its own separate pyx (a little gold-plated box--your priest can explain). Catholics do have to be VERY careful not to use the wheat-free, completely gluten-free hosts. Receiving the Precious Blood (after the consecration it is NOT wine) from the cup may also be an option for celiac disease Catholics. Ask the priest before Mass. Jesus is truly present body, blood, soul and divinity, in either "kind" of the Eucharist.

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    Guest Geoffrey

    Posted

    The researchers are obviously not talking about those Celiacs for whom even a crumb can cause horrible pain and diarrhea. Even worse, the silent damage that is done to the body even without having a noticeable "reaction". Once again, the Catholic Church is showing extreme lack of compassion for its parishioners in favor of archaic dogma.

    No, the Church is not "showing extreme lack of compassion…" The purpose of Holy Communion is to receive the grace of Jesus Christ through the reception of His Body, Blood, Soul, and Divinity, which brings one into greater union with Him. To receive this grace, it's not about quantity. One only need receive even the tiniest piece of a Consecrated Host, OR (here's the important part for this) the smallest drop - or sip - from the chalice. The Church has made it clear people with this affliction can receive from the chalice, just as one without celiac could receive all the grace needed from just the Sacred Host. Alcoholics regularly receive only the Consecrated Host, and they receive the full grace intended.

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    Guest Gabrielle

    Posted

    Come on now! It's about what is in your heart...your faith in God and in His son......to say that the gluten free hosts don't "meet Vatican standards" is hog wash! I receive gluten-free bread every time it's offered at my church and feel good about it...

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    Guest Jasmine

    Posted

    How Christian is it to deny holy communion to those who are gluten intolerant? It isn't at all Christian. It's bigoted and hypocritical and mean.

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    Guest Sonya Coover

    Posted

    Wow, this truly leaves me speechless for a moment! What if something that was administered by Jesus were found to be a poison with today's science and knowledge would the catholic authorities still take the same stand? Really, I'm glad I'm not Catholic but feel for my brothers and sisters that are!

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    The wine is an issue too. The priest puts a piece of the host in the chalice.

    And if you happen to get the cup with no piece of host, then people who have just ate gluten have their lips on the chalice. So either way the wine has gluten.

    It's enough gluten to make me sick.

    I'm also concerned the Vatican is telling people with celiac disease to ingest something that is harmful to their health. Doesn't that seem wrong? Even if it's such a small amount, people with celiac know gluten is harmful to their bodies.

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    No, the Church is not "showing extreme lack of compassion…" The purpose of Holy Communion is to receive the grace of Jesus Christ through the reception of His Body, Blood, Soul, and Divinity, which brings one into greater union with Him. To receive this grace, it's not about quantity. One only need receive even the tiniest piece of a Consecrated Host, OR (here's the important part for this) the smallest drop - or sip - from the chalice. The Church has made it clear people with this affliction can receive from the chalice, just as one without celiac could receive all the grace needed from just the Sacred Host. Alcoholics regularly receive only the Consecrated Host, and they receive the full grace intended.

    Geoffrey, are you celiac? Because you seem to know theory but not fact, and the fact is very few priests know the Vatican rules and even fewer understand cross contamination. If the priest practices intinction, then the wine isn't safe, either. Also, very few parishes offer the cup to the congregation and when they do, I don't want to drink from a cup that someone with a mouth full of wheat has drunk from.

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    Guest Pamela

    Posted

    I cannot receive communion at church, even the smallest trace has gluten. The wine becomes contaminated with everyone drinking from it with the host in there mouth. The government standards don't work for me. There are a lot of products marked gluten free that I cannot eat because they have small amounts of gluten and I get sick. I don't think Jesus would exclude anyone from receiving. He didn't say only people without celiac do this in memory of me!

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    Once again people are mistaking humans for the Divine. The Pope does not tell the Holy Spirit what to do. My option is communion by intent -- it is an option sanctioned by the Church. While receiving the Body and Blood of Christ is important, Christ always made clear his care and concern for the ill. Christ will not abandon those wish to believe but who cannot abide by human misinterpretation of His divine will.

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    Shannon you are right the Bible never says wheat. That is why so many people are leaving the Catholic religion. I would never be able to take the host. I do let the priest no before mass that I can not take the host and he brings me down the wine.

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    Guest Zloduska

    Posted

    No, the Church is not "showing extreme lack of compassion…" The purpose of Holy Communion is to receive the grace of Jesus Christ through the reception of His Body, Blood, Soul, and Divinity, which brings one into greater union with Him. To receive this grace, it's not about quantity. One only need receive even the tiniest piece of a Consecrated Host, OR (here's the important part for this) the smallest drop - or sip - from the chalice. The Church has made it clear people with this affliction can receive from the chalice, just as one without celiac could receive all the grace needed from just the Sacred Host. Alcoholics regularly receive only the Consecrated Host, and they receive the full grace intended.

    What [you] clearly [do] not understand is that for someone with severe celiac disease, ANY quantity of gluten causes horrible consequences! With all the compassion you have NOT shown to those with genetic autoimmune disorders.

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    Guest john stanczak

    Posted

    As a Catholic I very firnly believe I am receiving the actual body and blood of Christ. 28 years ago I gave up drinking alcohol and was afraid of taking the cup because I felt I would be back on booze. After 3 or 4 years I asked myself this question. If I believe the consecrated wine is the actual blood of Jesus would He allow me to go back to being an alcoholic?? From His blood ?? NO NO NO. If your faith is strong I would suggest taking just a small portion of the Host and see what happens. If no reaction take a bigger piece the next time..Jesus will work with you even if you only have a little itty bitty faith in Him.

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    Guest cheryl

    Posted

    Even the Beneditine sisters don't believe the churches attitude. They actually advertise that these low-gluten wafers are "produced in a dedicated gluten free factility" on their web site.

    Now how is it possible to bring in sufficient gluten to ensure that the end product contains .01% and also claim the facility is GLUTEN FREE?

     

    It simply is a lie!

     

    The issue is silly. God changes the host into his body. He is omnipotent. He loves every human he made and would never purposely do anything to cause suffering and DEATH! Therefore, he is perfectly willing to change that 100% gluten free wafer into his body.

    The Catholic Church is messed up on this point! I was Roman Catholic. Then I was diagnosed with celiac at the brink of death from the disease. I am not confused about the church's attitude.

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    Guest Denise

    Posted

    Come on now! It's about what is in your heart...your faith in God and in His son......to say that the gluten free hosts don't "meet Vatican standards" is hog wash! I receive gluten-free bread every time it's offered at my church and feel good about it...

    I have stopped taking communion as bread and take the Lord in my heart all the same. This is between my Lord and myself. I try to live like a good person and continue to do everything as before.

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    I am a psychotherapist who has celiac disease and who works with clients experiencing the stressors of maintaining health in a world that doesn't always understand. The stigma and the symptoms are enough to cope with for most...and this is not needed. My work requires that I maintain attitude of acceptance - and, it is this that I shall hope begins to appear in areas that are designed to be open and spiritual. Perhaps those in this region will grow in their understanding and acceptance.

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    I am a catholic super sensitive celiac sufferer who agrees that requiring the host to contain wheat is not what Jesus intended. However, I am O.K. with just receiving the sacrament in the form of wine. When I ask if we could set this up in a way that I wouldn't be cross-contaminated by others drinking from the chalice who had just received the wheat host my priest was unreceptive. I just gave up and don't go to communion. My experience was, that the priest was very interested in defending the church's stance on wheat being required in the host but not very interested in helping me receive the sacrament. Priorities?

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    What [you] clearly [do] not understand is that for someone with severe celiac disease, ANY quantity of gluten causes horrible consequences! With all the compassion you have NOT shown to those with genetic autoimmune disorders.

    I would simply agree - a drop or a crumb to someone suffering could mean continued suffering. I do not believe that this is necessary given our options of protecting and caring for anyone who is ill. Compassion, understanding and incorporating knowledge is what is particularly important in such collective understanding.

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    I am a catholic super sensitive celiac sufferer who agrees that requiring the host to contain wheat is not what Jesus intended. However, I am O.K. with just receiving the sacrament in the form of wine. When I ask if we could set this up in a way that I wouldn't be cross-contaminated by others drinking from the chalice who had just received the wheat host my priest was unreceptive. I just gave up and don't go to communion. My experience was, that the priest was very interested in defending the church's stance on wheat being required in the host but not very interested in helping me receive the sacrament. Priorities?

    Hi Susan - I am sorry to read another story of unwillingness to adapt to conditions that we experience. I hope you will continue to speak about this and not allow your voice to be quieted or dismissed. Awareness develops after priorities are challenged.

     

    Best to you!

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    Come on now! It's about what is in your heart...your faith in God and in His son......to say that the gluten free hosts don't "meet Vatican standards" is hog wash! I receive gluten-free bread every time it's offered at my church and feel good about it...

    Gabrielle - I agree with you totally! And, for all of you reading this - isn't it slightly disturbing that we are outsourcing our communion? I have nothing against Germany - but what about finding a location within the US to provide us with creating the blessed gluten-free offering? At least shipment costs would be lower, no?

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    At my parish in southern California, I bring my host from the Benedictine nuns in my own pyx. At Communion time, the ciborium with all the gluten-free pyxes is brought to a special place, and we receive them there, along with the Precious Blood in a chalice from which no one else has drunk. It's a system that works very well. Our diocese has no problem with these low-gluten-free hosts.

     

    I think some priests and bishops just don't get it. I travel often, and the priests have been very helpful except in one place. I urge people to "shop" for a parish that meets their needs.

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    Guest GlutenFreeWorship

    Posted

    If Jesus were here, He would agree that wheat/gluten is bad for the body - EVERYbody. This is just another example of man-made doctrines that are pure blasphemy. I don't care if a HUMAN wrote down into the holy scriptures that we must eat wheat; it was misinformation from the start. Even Jewish people still consider wheat/gluten to be Kosher... and gluten free matzo is NOT Kosher for Seder. This gluten thing has turned many gentiles and semites into hypocrites! Pray for them to see the error of their ways!

     

    These are all the types of people who've lost all sight of what it really means to serve God and help our brothers and sisters. And I'd bet my soul that the Vatican takes kickbacks from the wheat industry!

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    Guest Christine Toms

    Posted

    Such middle-ages doctrine by any church is fundamentalist and dangerous hogwash. I can't think that a toxic sweet substance would be given to a diabetic or a packet of peanuts given to a fatal nut allergy sufferer. So why gluten? It's almost like advocating burning witches at the stake. I thank God this idiot isn't in my parish and recommend a gluten-free congregation goes to another church or denomination, if necessary. Perhaps contrary to popular belief, God is bigger than the Vatican.

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    As a Catholic I very firnly believe I am receiving the actual body and blood of Christ. 28 years ago I gave up drinking alcohol and was afraid of taking the cup because I felt I would be back on booze. After 3 or 4 years I asked myself this question. If I believe the consecrated wine is the actual blood of Jesus would He allow me to go back to being an alcoholic?? From His blood ?? NO NO NO. If your faith is strong I would suggest taking just a small portion of the Host and see what happens. If no reaction take a bigger piece the next time..Jesus will work with you even if you only have a little itty bitty faith in Him.

    It doesn't work that way. Would you tell someone with a severe, life-threatening peanut allergy to just try a little? NEVER! I can appreciate your personal experience and I know you are trying to be helpful but please do a little research before giving incorrect medical advice. Gluten causes more than just vommiting in celiacs. It can set off a chain of reactions and eventually lead to many cancers and autoimmune diseases. Thank you.

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    Omission Gluten-Free Lager,
    Omission uses aromatic hops to brew a refreshing and crisp beer in the traditional lager style. Alcohol is 4.6% by volume.
    Omission Gluten-Free Pale AleBold and hoppy, Omission Pale Ale is a hop-forward American Pale Ale, brewed to showcase the Cascade hop profile. Amber in color, Omission Pale Ale’s floral aroma is complimented by caramel malt body. Alcohol is 5.8% by volume.
    Their website states that, before shipping, Omission tests gluten levels in every batch both at the brewery, and at an independent lab, using the R5 Competitive ELISA gluten test, to ensure that the beers measure well below the Codex gluten-free standard of 20 ppm or less.
    Sprecher Shakparo Ale
    Sprecher's gluten free Shakparo Ale is a West African Shakparo-style beer brewed from sorghum and millet. An unfiltered, light, crisp ale with a cider or fruit highlights and a dry aftertaste.
    For the more adventurous, Sprecher also brews Mbege Ale, which is an unfiltered ale brewed with bananas, yes, bananas, in the African style. Light hints of banana remain present in the aroma and flavor of this unique offering.
    Steadfast Sorghum Pale Ale
    Steadfast brewery uses Cascade-and Columbus hops and White sorghum syrup and molasses to brew their golden amber, Indian/American-style Steadfast Sorghum Pale Ale. Alcohol is 6.8% by volume.
    Gluten-free Ciders
    Crispin Browns Lane
    Browns Lane by Crispin is a lightly sparking, crisply effervescent cider made with traditional English bittersweet cider apples sourced in the Malvern Hills of Worcestershire.
    The result is a rich cider with a dark straw color, and an aroma that evokes an almost traditional farmhouse cider bouquet. Soft, subtle natural apple sweetness up front, with a slightly dry, woody, lingering finish.
    Crispin Original Cider
    Crispin Super Premium Hard Apple Cider is naturally fermented using fresh pressed apple-juice, not apple-juice concentrate, from a premium blend of US West Coast apples, with no added malt, grape-wine, or spirit alcohol. The crisp flavor of Crispin is polished with pure apple juice, with no added sugar, colorants or sorbate or benzoate preservatives and cold filtered for crisp refreshment.
    Strongbow Cider
    Strongbow uses a traditional English recipe to brew a crisp, refreshing premium cider.
    Magners Cider
    Magners uses 17 varieties of apples and ferments their cider up to two years to deliver a full-bodied, well-rounded traditional cider.

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/22/2018 - Proteins are the building blocks of life. If scientists can figure out how to create and grow new proteins, they can create new treatments and cures to a multitude of medical, biological and even environmental conditions.
    For a couple of decades now, scientists have been searching for a biological Rosetta stone that would allow them to engineer proteins with precision, but the problem has remained dauntingly complex.  Researchers had a pretty good understanding of the very simple way that the linear chemical code carried by strands of DNA translates into strings of amino acids in proteins. 
    But, one of the main problems in protein engineering has to do with the way proteins fold into their various three-dimensional structures. Until recently, no one has been able to decipher the rules that will predict how proteins fold into those three-dimensional structures.  So even if researchers were somehow able to design a protein with the right shape for a given job, they wouldn’t know how to go about making it from protein’s building blocks, the amino acids.
    But now, scientists like William DeGrado, a chemist at the University of California, San Francisco, and David Baker, director for the Institute for Protein Design at the University of Washington, say that designing proteins will become at least as important as manipulating DNA has been in the past couple of decades.
    After making slow, but incremental progress over the years, scientists have improved their ability to decipher the complex language of protein shapes. Among other things, they’ve gained a better understanding of how then the laws of physics cause the proteins to snap into folded origami-like structures based on the ways amino acids are attracted or repelled by others many places down the chain.
    It is this new ability to decipher the complex language of protein shapes that has fueled their progress. UCSF’s DeGrado is using these new breakthroughs to search for new medicines that will be more stable, both on the shelf and in the body. He is also looking for new ways to treat Alzheimer’s disease and similar neurological conditions, which result when brain proteins fold incorrectly and create toxic deposits.
    Meanwhile, Baker’s is working on a single vaccine that would protect against all strains of the influenza virus, along with a method for breaking down the gluten proteins in wheat, which could help to generate new treatments for people with celiac disease. 
    With new computing power, look for progress on the understanding, design, and construction of brain proteins. As understanding, design and construction improve, look for brain proteins to play a major role in disease research and treatment. This is all great news for people looking to improve our understanding and treatment of celiac disease.
    Source:
    Bloomberg.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/21/2018 - Just a year ago, Starbucks debuted their Canadian bacon, egg and cheddar cheese gluten-free sandwich. During that year, the company basked in praise from customers with celiac disease and gluten-sensitivity for their commitment to delivering a safe gluten-free alternative to it’s standard breakfast offerings.
    But that commitment came to an ignoble end recently as Starbucks admitted that their gluten-free sandwich was plagued by  “low sales,” and was simply not sustainable from a company perspective. The sandwich may not have sold well, but it was much-loved by those who came to rely on it.
    With the end of that sandwich came the complaints. Customers on social media were anything but quiet, as seen in numerous posts, tweets and comments pointing out the callous and tone-deaf nature of the announcement which took place in the middle of national Celiac Disease Awareness Month. More than a few posts threatened to dump Starbucks altogether.
    A few of the choice tweets include the following:  
    “If I’m going to get coffee and can’t eat anything might as well be DD. #celiac so your eggbites won’t work for me,” tweeted @NotPerryMason. “They’re discontinuing my @Starbucks gluten-free sandwich which is super sad, but will save me money because I won’t have a reason to go to Starbucks and drop $50 a week,” tweeted @nwillard229. Starbucks is not giving up on gluten-free entirely, though. The company will still offer several items for customers who prefer gluten-free foods, including Sous Vide Egg Bites, a Marshmallow Dream Bar and Siggi’s yogurt.
    Stay tuned to learn more about Starbucks gluten-free foods going forward.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/19/2018 - Looking for a nutritious, delicious meal that is both satisfying and gluten-free? This tasty quinoa salad is just the thing for you. Easy to make and easy to transport to work. This salad of quinoa and vegetables gets a rich depth from chicken broth, and a delicious tang from red wine vinegar. Just pop it in a container, seal and take it to work or school. Make the quinoa a day or two ahead as needed. Add or subtract veggies as you like.
    Ingredients:
    1 cup red quinoa, rinsed well ½ cup water ½ cup chicken broth 2 radishes, thinly sliced 1 small bunch fresh pea sprouts 1 small Persian cucumber, diced 1 small avocado, ripe, sliced into chunks Cherry or grape tomatoes Fresh sunflower seeds 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar  Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper Directions:
    Simmer quinoa in water and chicken broth until tender.
    Dish into bowls.
    Top with veggies, salt and pepper, and sunflower seeds. 
    Splash with red wine vinegar and enjoy!

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/18/2018 - Across the country, colleges and universities are rethinking the way they provide food services for students with food allergies and food intolerance. In some cases, that means major renovations. In other cases, it means creating completely new dining and food halls. To document both their commitment and execution of gluten-free and allergen-free dining, these new food halls are frequently turning to auditing and accreditation firms, such as Kitchens with Confidence.
    The latest major player to make the leap to allergen-free dining is Syracuse University. The university’s Food Services recently earned an official gluten-free certification from Kitchens with Confidence for four of the University’s dining centers, with the fifth soon to follow.
    To earn the gluten-free certification from Kitchens with Confidence, food services must pass a 41 point audit process that includes 200 control check points. The food service must also agree to get any new food item approved in advance, and to submit to monthly testing of prep surfaces, to furnish quarterly reports, and to provide information on any staffing changes, recalls or incident reports. Kitchens with Confidence representatives also conduct annual inspections of each dining center.
    Syracuse students and guests eating at Ernie Davis, Shaw, Graham and Sadler dining centers can now choose safe, reliable gluten-free food from a certified gluten-free food center. The fifth dining center, Brockway, is currently undergoing renovations scheduled for completion by fall, when Brockway will also receive its certification.
    Syracuse Food Services has offered a gluten-free foods in its dining centers for years. According to Jamie Cyr, director of Auxiliary Services, the university believes that the independent Gluten-Free Certification from Kitchens with Confidence will help ease the anxiety for parents and students.”
    Syracuse is understandably proud of their accomplishment. According to Mark Tewksbury, director of residence dining operations, “campus dining centers serve 11,000 meals per day and our food is made fresh daily. Making sure that it is nutritious, delicious and safe for all students is a top priority.”
    Look for more colleges and universities to follow in the footsteps of Syracuse and others that have made safe, reliable food available for their students with food allergies or sensitivities.
    Read more.

    Zyana Morris
    Celiac.com 05/17/2018 - Celiac disease is not one of the most deadly diseases out there, but it can put you through a lot of misery. Also known as coeliac, celiac disease is an inherited immune disorder. What happens is that your body’s immune system overreacts to gluten and damages the small intestine. People who suffer from the disease cannot digest gluten, a protein found in grain such as rye, barley, and wheat. 
    While it may not sound like a severe complication at first, coeliac can be unpleasant to deal with. What’s worse is it would lower your body’s capacity to absorb minerals and vitamins. Naturally, the condition would cause nutritional deficiencies. The key problem that diagnosing celiac is difficult and takes take longer than usual. Surprisingly, the condition has over 200 identified symptoms.
    More than three million people suffer from the coeliac disease in the United States alone. Even though diagnosis is complicated, there are symptoms that can help you identify the condition during the early stages to minimize the damage. 
    Here is how you can recognize the main symptoms of celiac disease:
    Diarrhea
    In various studies conducted over years, the most prominent symptom of celiac disease is chronic diarrhea.
    People suffering from the condition would experience loose watery stools that can last for up to four weeks after they stop taking gluten. Diarrhea can also be a symptom of food poisoning and other conditions, which is why it makes it difficult to diagnose coeliac. In certain cases, celiac disease can take up to four years to establish a sound diagnosis.
    Vomiting
    Another prominent symptom is vomiting.  
    When accompanied by diarrhea, vomiting can be a painful experience that would leave you exhausted. It also results in malnutrition and the patient experiences weight loss (not in a good way though). If you experience uncontrolled vomiting, report the matter to a physician to manage the condition.
    Bloating
    Since coeliac disease damages the small intestine, bloating is another common system. This is due to inflammation of the digestive tract. In a study with more than a 1,000 participants, almost 73% of the people reported bloating after ingesting gluten. 
    Bloating can be managed by eliminating gluten from the diet which is why a gluten-free diet is necessary for people suffering from celiac disease.
    Fatigue
    Constant feeling of tiredness and low energy levels is another common symptom associated with celiac disease. If you experience a lack of energy after in taking gluten, then you need to consult a physician to diagnose the condition. Now fatigue can also result from inefficient thyroid function, infections, and depression (a symptom of the coeliac disease). However, almost 51% of celiac patients suffer from fatigue in a study.
    Itchy Rash
    Now the chances of getting a rash after eating gluten are slim, but the symptom has been associated with celiac disease in the past. The condition can cause dermatitis herpetiformis, which causes a blistering skin rash that occurs around the buttocks, knees, and elbows. 
    A study found out that almost 17% of patients suffering from celiac disease might develop dermatitis herpetiformis due to lack of right treatment. Make sure you schedule an online appointment with your dermatologist or visit the nearest healthcare facility to prevent worsening of symptoms.
    Even with such common symptoms, diagnosing the condition is imperative for a quick recovery and to mitigate the long-term risks associated with celiac disease. 
    Sources:
    ncbi.nlm.nih.gov  Celiac.com ncbi.nlm.nih.gov  mendfamily.com