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    Gluten-free Diet Now Fuels Tennis Star Andy Murray


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 12/26/2011 - After five months on a gluten-free diet, top professional tennis player Andy Murray has more energy than before, a faster recovery time, and a new-found ability to wake up early, according to comments Murray made when asked by reporters.


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    Photo: CC--Carine06The Scot says that he is amazed by the energy he's gotten from his gluten-free diet. He also says that his change in eating habits is proving beneficial on the court.

    "I think there’s a bit of difference in my approach to training and the diet. I feel pretty fresh," he says.

    Playing indoors at Paris Bercy, where early starts are common, Murray said " I slept seven and a half hours after playing both singles and doubles, but still woke up feeling fresh. The diet has given me more energy."

    Does he miss eating bread and other gluten-containing favorites?

    Yes. He says that, at restaurants, "I miss being able to pick up a menu and order what I want — like bread when you're waiting for your food to come…It can be quite frustrating when everyone else is dunking their bread in olive oil or smearing it in butter."

    Still, if Murray sees anything like benefits experienced by Novak Djokovic, who credits a string of big victories to his gluten-free diet, the tennis world is in for some gluten-free excitement!

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    I have been using gluten free Chex for my crust instead of graham crackers. I am also a diabetic so I am trying to merge the two together, (not easy).

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    Andy, don't copy Djokovic's diet, copy his approach: be bold and confident and attack! No magic diet is going to help you if you continue cowardly pushing game against the top 3.

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    Actually eating bread before meal is unhealthy behavior and the restaurants do it on purpose. If you start your meal by eating carbs it causes release of insulin in response to the rising blood sugar and makes you feel more hungry and eat more. Many restaurants give you free complimentary bread so that you order more food and spend more money. In addition, surges of insulin cause blood sugar issues and promote weight gain. It doesn't matter if the bread is gluten-free or not there are would be the same undesirable effects on the blood sugar levels.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. He has covered Health News for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. His work has appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate, among others.

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