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    Gluten-free Pizza Sets Record for World's Largest Pie


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 01/11/2013 - In case you were wondering just how big gluten-free pizza has become, the answer is: Big. Very big. World-record big.


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    Photo: Business WireConsider the recent news from Italy, where five chefs joined forces to craft the world's largest pizza, a pizza which also happens to be gluten-free.

    The pie shattered the previous world record for largest pizza ever baked, and set a new record for world's largest gluten-free pizza.

    To make the pizza, the chefs used 19,800 pounds of Schar gluten-free flour, 2,480 gallons of water, 10,000 pounds of tomato sauce, 8,800 pounds of mozzarella cheese, 1,488 pounds of margarine, 551 pounds of rock salt, 275 pounds of parmesan cheese, 220 pounds of lettuce and 55 pounds of vinegar, and 298 gallons of yeast.

    The final product required two full days of cooking to complete. It was 131-feet across, and topped the scales at a whopping 51,257 pounds.

    According to the Guinness World Records, the previous record for the largest circular pizza ever baked belonged to a pie made in Norwood, South Africa by Norwood Hypermarket on December 8, 1990. That pizza weighed 26,883 pounds. It measured 122 feet, 8 inches in diameter, weighed 26,883 pounds, and contained 9,920 pounds of flour, 3,960 pounds of cheese, 1,763 pounds of mushrooms, 1,984 pounds of tomato puree, and 1,984 pounds of chopped tomatoes.

    The Italian cooking team was headed by Dovilio Nardi, who had previously helped to create an Italian pizza chain that catered toward people with celiac disease. The event was organized by Dr. Schar, a company that produces gluten-free food.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. He has covered Health News for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. His work has appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate, among others.

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    Scott Adams
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    Jefferson Adams
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    Source:
    FoodProcessing.com.au