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    Gwyneth Paltrow Talks Gluten-Free in Advance of Iron Man 3


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 05/24/2013 - Gwyneth Paltrow is gluten-free and on a publicity swing as part of her role in Iron Man 3 this spring.


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    Photo: CC--YausserIn an interview in Self magazine, Oscar winner Gwyneth Paltrow spoke a bit about the benefits of eating gluten-free, and about her gluten-free cook book due out next month.

    The 40-year old actor explained how giving up gluten has changed her life for the better. For one thing, she says, she feels lighter and more relaxed. Before going gluten-free, Paltrow says she had "a lot of unexpressed anger. I made everyone else’s feelings more important than my own. I’d suck it up and then be alone in my car yelling at traffic or fighting with hangers in my closet when they got stuck together.”

    Paltrow has been derided by some for perhaps being too strict with her children's diets, by some for making her children a gluten-free diet, and by others for allowing them to break that diet.

    But the "Iron Man" star explained to Dr. Mehmet Oz, that the dietary restrictions were due to her children's allergies, rather than stern parenting style. She said that Moses, 6, "has very bad eczema and he's allergic to gluten and she [daughter Apple, 8] is allergic to cow dairy."

    She adds that, at home, she tries "to make everything gluten-free for him because the difference in his comfort is unbelievable when he's sticking to what he's meant to be eating."

    Paltrow's new cookbook, "It's All Good," details how she steers clear of processed grains when feeding her children, and goes out of her way to avoid gluten.

    Read more: NY Daily News, The Hollywood Gossip

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    Guest julie

    Posted

    My little 2 and a half year old boy has very bad eczema too. He's been under the care of Classical Homeopathy for 3 months, seen initially for chronic loose stools (for a 6 month period). Switching him off of milk/ice cream to almond milk and omitting fruits/sugar from his diet helped him return to normal BM's. What was surprising was the worsening of his eczema following this. We started gluten free this week. I am hopeful that this is the ticket.

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    Guest Jacques Maltais

    Posted

    Poor Ms. Paltrow, don't avoid gluten if you don't have to. Eat all you can eat. Let people with celiac decease have a gluten-free diet, they have to be strictly gluten-free. And well verify the allergy of your son and don't put the rest of the family on this diet if they don't need it. I'm celiac and it is very difficult all around the world to be on this strict diet. "It's all good" may be for the one who has to be gluten free, but it's very difficult and very expensive.

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    Guest Marsha

    Posted

    Just fine but when will they all get off this bandwagon? I am sick of a non-celiacs getting into this area. I wish to God anymore that I did not have to eat gluten-free. I get in a bad mood over it plainly after 21 years. It is inconvenient when traveling and I am sick of saying, I can't eat that!! I am on the wrong planet and these people want to join my colony??? Go figure! GEEZ ... it is not the best diet for anyone, PERIOD. If you have to then you have to adhere but to go looking for it? Please! Get a life!

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    Guest Jenny

    Posted

    My little 2 and a half year old boy has very bad eczema too. He's been under the care of Classical Homeopathy for 3 months, seen initially for chronic loose stools (for a 6 month period). Switching him off of milk/ice cream to almond milk and omitting fruits/sugar from his diet helped him return to normal BM's. What was surprising was the worsening of his eczema following this. We started gluten free this week. I am hopeful that this is the ticket.

    Have you had him checked for nut allergies? That might explain why the addition of almond milk aggravated the eczema.

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    Guest Lonna

    Posted

    Just fine but when will they all get off this bandwagon? I am sick of a non-celiacs getting into this area. I wish to God anymore that I did not have to eat gluten-free. I get in a bad mood over it plainly after 21 years. It is inconvenient when traveling and I am sick of saying, I can't eat that!! I am on the wrong planet and these people want to join my colony??? Go figure! GEEZ ... it is not the best diet for anyone, PERIOD. If you have to then you have to adhere but to go looking for it? Please! Get a life!

    Amen to this Marsha!! I too have celiac disease and I also am tired of saying, "I can't eat that!!" Eating gluten free is a way of life for us which we strictly have to adhere to...I do definitely get in a bad mood also because socially it is very difficult....I don't wish this on anyone....seems like going gluten free is just a fad to some people...

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    Just fine but when will they all get off this bandwagon? I am sick of a non-celiacs getting into this area. I wish to God anymore that I did not have to eat gluten-free. I get in a bad mood over it plainly after 21 years. It is inconvenient when traveling and I am sick of saying, I can't eat that!! I am on the wrong planet and these people want to join my colony??? Go figure! GEEZ ... it is not the best diet for anyone, PERIOD. If you have to then you have to adhere but to go looking for it? Please! Get a life!

    I believe she made it clear she had some behavioral issues from gluten ingestion and it's best for a whole household to be gluten free if a person in the house has issues. Less cross contamination.

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    Guest asdf

    Posted

    Wow. I'm really surprised at how mad celiacs can be at those of us with non-celiac gluten intolerance. geesh, if you could cure your known issues of, say, MS, migraines, brain fog, eczema, IBS, etc, why not stop eating what was in essence poisoning you? And, are the celiacs aware that non-celiac gluten sensitivity is cited by some experts as 10% of the population? that is, it is more likely that a person is non-celiac gluten sensitive than gluten sensitive. So, should we kick a famous person who recognizes and addresses health issues in themselves and their family? And, seriously, should we kick a famous person who brings a POSITIVE spotlight to gluten sensitivity?

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    Guest Jill

    Posted

    I have to agree with Jacques and Marcia - I am a celiac coupled with diabetes - diet controlled - and it is an absolute pain if you want to eat out and has taken out quite a bit of joy from my life as I used to love eating out, but your choice is now so limited and lots of places say they can't make you anything. Let's face it, who wants to go out and be offered an omelette when everyone else is enjoying fancy dishes.There is no way I would opt to go gluten-free unless I had to. Nearly all gluten-free foods seem to contain more sugar which is an added problem for me. Food is for enjoyment not only nutrition - enjoy it while you can.

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    Guest Gillian

    Posted

    I have only been gluten-free for a year or so but am resigned to the fact as it makes me feel so, so much better, why shouldn't anyne else follow this diet if they want to, if it doesn't make them feel better long term they will probably get fed up with the complications and give it up anyway, what's the problem. Some people should try and discover why they are so aggressive about everything and calm down a little.

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    Guest Carissa

    Posted

    Just fine but when will they all get off this bandwagon? I am sick of a non-celiacs getting into this area. I wish to God anymore that I did not have to eat gluten-free. I get in a bad mood over it plainly after 21 years. It is inconvenient when traveling and I am sick of saying, I can't eat that!! I am on the wrong planet and these people want to join my colony??? Go figure! GEEZ ... it is not the best diet for anyone, PERIOD. If you have to then you have to adhere but to go looking for it? Please! Get a life!

    I have had celiac since 2009 and I am grateful. The modernized wheat today is completely different from the wheat 50 years ago. No one is able to fully digest today's wheat. I have an air born reaction to wheat meaning I can't even go to a restaurant where gluten is being cooked or served. Consider yourself lucky. Even with my air borne reaction I'm still grateful to have celiac.

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    Guest smjb

    Posted

    The way I see it is the more people who go gluten-free (whether they have to or not), the easier it is for us who have to be gluten-free. I say rid the world of gluten then I can go to anyone's house or to any restaurant and not have to say, "I can't eat that".

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    My little 2 and a half year old boy has very bad eczema too. He's been under the care of Classical Homeopathy for 3 months, seen initially for chronic loose stools (for a 6 month period). Switching him off of milk/ice cream to almond milk and omitting fruits/sugar from his diet helped him return to normal BM's. What was surprising was the worsening of his eczema following this. We started gluten free this week. I am hopeful that this is the ticket.

    I have eczema as well, and discovered that breaking open a vitamin E capsule and rubbing it on the area relieves the itch immediately and clears up the eczema. Hope that helps!

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    Just fine but when will they all get off this bandwagon? I am sick of a non-celiacs getting into this area. I wish to God anymore that I did not have to eat gluten-free. I get in a bad mood over it plainly after 21 years. It is inconvenient when traveling and I am sick of saying, I can't eat that!! I am on the wrong planet and these people want to join my colony??? Go figure! GEEZ ... it is not the best diet for anyone, PERIOD. If you have to then you have to adhere but to go looking for it? Please! Get a life!

    I just found out I am celiac and my mom went on the gluten-free diet with me for support. I think it's great that people want to show support, especially a public figure like Gwyneth. It spreads awareness and will hopefully help us celiacs have more options in the future!

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    Wow. I'm really surprised at how mad celiacs can be at those of us with non-celiac gluten intolerance. geesh, if you could cure your known issues of, say, MS, migraines, brain fog, eczema, IBS, etc, why not stop eating what was in essence poisoning you? And, are the celiacs aware that non-celiac gluten sensitivity is cited by some experts as 10% of the population? that is, it is more likely that a person is non-celiac gluten sensitive than gluten sensitive. So, should we kick a famous person who recognizes and addresses health issues in themselves and their family? And, seriously, should we kick a famous person who brings a POSITIVE spotlight to gluten sensitivity?

    I agree. Celiacs don't have the monopoly on gluten-related disorders. I haven't been diagnosed with celiac but have discovered the hard way that I'm very sensitive. I had worsening symptoms that I couldn't resolve until I started dealing with gluten contamination. I went on a day trip with my family yesterday and had to pack all my meals and snacks. In restaurants, they got to order from the menus while I had to pull out my own food. It felt awkward and was pretty darn inconvenient too. We non-celiacs face many of these same issues. Considering we're all in the same gluten-free boat, we need to work together to raise awareness and support each other.

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    Just fine but when will they all get off this bandwagon? I am sick of a non-celiacs getting into this area. I wish to God anymore that I did not have to eat gluten-free. I get in a bad mood over it plainly after 21 years. It is inconvenient when traveling and I am sick of saying, I can't eat that!! I am on the wrong planet and these people want to join my colony??? Go figure! GEEZ ... it is not the best diet for anyone, PERIOD. If you have to then you have to adhere but to go looking for it? Please! Get a life!

    My theory is that the more people want to do the diet the more that people will realize how we as celiacs suffer to find good food, and then maybe more gluten free food will be available in stores.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. He has covered Health News for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. His work has appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate, among others.

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