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    Holidaily Gluten-free Brewery Opens in Coors' Backyard


    Jefferson Adams
    Image Caption: Holidaily Brewing Company, Golden Colorado.

    Celiac.com 03/08/2016 - A tiny new brewery, the 3,000-square-foot, totally gluten-free, Holidaily Brewing Company is now open in Golden, Colorado, home to beer industry giant Coors.


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    Holidaily Gluten-free BreweryHolidaily will brew all of its beers without barley or wheat, free from gluten and the component proteins that can adversely affect people with celiac disease or gluten intolerance.

    Holidaily joins a handful of other small Colorado breweries producing gluten-free beers, including New Planet Beer in Boulder and Great Frontier Brewing Co. in Lakewood. And, several major brewers make gluten-free beers, including Anheuser-Busch, maker of gluten-free Redbridge Ale, and Widmer Brothers Brewing, makers of gluten-free Omission beer.

    However, Holidaily is Colorado's only dedicated, gluten-free brewing facility, and just the the 5th in the United States. That means there is no gluten ingredients anywhere on the premises, so there is no chance of cross-contamination.

    Operations at Holidaily are overseen by head brewer Wayne Burns, who was quoted in Craftbeer.com saying: "The key to the deliciousness of our beer is high quality ingredients and knowledgeable employees. We use the finest locally sourced, malted, gluten-free grains as the base for our beers."

    In a statement on the website, owner Karen Hertz says that Holidaily is out not just to sell beer, but to actually improve "the lives of people who have likely been sick with a wide range of symptoms. We are on a mission to give people a good, gluten-free beer drinking experience. It's really about so much more than beer."

    Currently, Holidaily beers include Favorite Blonde Ale, which has an A.B.V. of 5%, and is made with American Ale Yeast, Bravo, Cascade, Centennial Hops, and Pale Millet, Pale Buckwheat and Munich Millet supplied locally by Grouse Malting and Roasting in Wellington, Colorado.

    In their taproom, Holidaily also offers two other specialty craft brews, Riva Stout A.B.V 6.75%, and Fat Randy's IPA, A.B.V 7%. Holidaily Brewing Co.'s brewery and tasting room are located in Golden, Co. at 801 Brickyard Circle.

    Have you tried any of the Holidaily beers? Would you? Share your thoughts below.

    Find out more about Holidaily beers at Holidaily.com.

    Read more at: RockyMountainBrewRuns.com and at BizJournals.com.

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    People need to be aware that not all beers labeled as gluten-free are truly gluten-free. For example Omission beer, listed in this article, is made with gluten ingredients but then supposedly the gluten is removed but it's very likely a good amount of gluten remains. For Celiacs, this is obviously not good. This is a gluten-reduced beer, NOT a gluten-free beer.

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    People need to be aware that not all beers labeled as gluten-free are truly gluten-free. For example Omission beer, listed in this article, is made with gluten ingredients but then supposedly the gluten is removed but it's very likely a good amount of gluten remains. For Celiacs, this is obviously not good. This is a gluten-reduced beer, NOT a gluten-free beer.

    Omission is tested to be sure it is gluten-free.

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    People need to be aware that not all beers labeled as gluten-free are truly gluten-free. For example Omission beer, listed in this article, is made with gluten ingredients but then supposedly the gluten is removed but it's very likely a good amount of gluten remains. For Celiacs, this is obviously not good. This is a gluten-reduced beer, NOT a gluten-free beer.

    Not true. Omission is made with wheat and barley ingredients, but is filtered to remove gluten, contains under 20 ppm gluten. Omission routinely tests their products, and they routinely test under they 20ppm gluten allowed by the FDA. They cannot label Omission "Gluten-Free," due to FDA restrictions, but it does meet FDA standards in terms of gluten content.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. He has covered Health News for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. His work has appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate, among others.

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    Scott Adams
    Frederik Willem Janssen is head of the Chemistry Department, Food Inspection Service in Zutphen, and a subsidiary of the Inspector of Health Protection (similar to the FDA in America). Their lab has a special interest in.... modified gluten, edible packaging materials (which may contain gluten), and detection of hidden gluten in foods, including the development of improved detection methods. He is also a member of the Medical/Scientific Advisory Committee of the Dutch Celiac Society.
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    I found a report in a periodical by the Flemish Celiac Society of an investigation that was published in 1992 about immunological determination of gluten in beer and some distilled liquor. This confirmed our findings that the gluten content of beer is quite variable (the authors found levels from zero to 400 mg /liter gluten).
    They did find gluten in distilled liquor! The levels varied from zero to 200-mg gluten/liter. The highest amount was found in a "Creme de Framboise" (200 mg/liter) but second was a French brandy VSOP with a score of 180 m g/liter. A Dutch gin was negative, which might be an indication that gluten in these type of liquor is not a carry over to the distillate! My guess is that this gluten is derived from the caramel coloring, though there is no proof about this yet. I always advise sensitive patients to abstain from brown colored liquor!
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    Scott Adams
    Celiac.com 07/12/2004 - There have been numerous claims that traditional barley-based beers are gluten free or that all beers are gluten free. Unfortunately, the area is very grey and substantiated on technicalities. The purpose of this post is to eliminate the confusion about gluten as it relates to beer. Gluten is an umbrella term used to describe a mixture of individual proteins found in many grains. Celiac disease (celiac sprue or gluten intolerance, gluten sensitivity) is an autoimmune disorder that is triggered by the ingestion of some of these glutens. People with classic celiac disease are intolerant to the gluten proteins found in wheat, barley, rye, spelt and a couple other lesser known grains. All these grains have a relative of the gluten protein. Interestingly, corn, rice and sorghum also have gluten proteins but are not toxic to celiacs. Herein lies one of the fundamental problems; the use of the term gluten intolerance to cover only certain gluten containing grains is confusing for consumers and food manufacturers alike. Unfortunately, it seems that the inertia for using celiac disease and gluten intolerance as synonyms is unstoppable. Therefore, it becomes the responsibility of both consumers and manufacturers to make sure the terms being discussed are defined and understood.
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     http://www.greenfieldreporter.com/view/story/c03f9954de0b4eaf8514c5eeb1dba418/CO--Colorado-Millet-Beer/

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/18/2013 - If you brew a bunch of beer using traditional wheat and barley, then add enzymes to break down gluten proteins so that the final product tests negative for gluten, is the beer actually gluten-free? Should it be labeled as gluten-free?
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    Premium ingredients, bakeshop delicious recipes, and happy customers were our inspiration from the beginning— and are still the cornerstones of Bakery On Main today. We are a fiercely ethical company that believes in integrity and feels that happiness and wholesome, great tasting food should be harmonious. We strive for that in everything we bake in our dedicated gluten-free facility that is GFCO Certified and SQF Level 3 Certified. We use only natural, NON-GMO Project Verified ingredients and all of our products are certified Kosher Parve, dairy and casein free, and we have recently introduced certified Organic items as well! 
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    This systematic review and meta-analysis showed celiac disease to be reported worldwide. Blood test data shows celiac disease rate of 1.4%, while biopsy data shows 0.7%. The prevalence of celiac disease varies with sex, age, and location. 
    This review demonstrates a need for more comprehensive population-based studies of celiac disease in numerous countries.  The 1.4% rate indicates that there are 91.2 million people worldwide with celiac disease, and 3.9 million are in the U.S.A.
    Source:
    Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018 Jun;16(6):823-836.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2017.06.037.