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    Jacqueline Laurita Goes Gluten-free, High-Tech to Help Autistic Son


    Jefferson Adams
    Image Caption: Photo: Wikimedia Commons--Zap2it

    Celiac.com 08/16/2013 - Research suggests that many people with autism are sensitive to gluten, and plenty of people turn to gluten-free diets to help their autistic children.


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    Photo: Wikimedia Commons--Zap2itBut for Real Housewives of New Jersey star Jacqueline Laurita, a gluten-free diet is just the start. She's trying anything and everything to help their autistic three-year-old son Nicholas, including some pretty high-tech therapies.

    Jacqueline spends a great deal of her time researching her son’s condition, and finding new therapies to help his development.

    Laurita is currently trying a gluten- and casein-free (Gluten-free Casein-free) diet, and she’s even trying out a hyperbaric oxygen chamber bed, which is said to reduce inflammation, and increase oxygen levels and blood flow to the brain.

    She decided to give it a try after reading that hypbaric oxygen chambers might help children on the [autism] spectrum.

    Still, Laurita is not counting on a any miracles. She points out that not every treatment will work, but they might help, "so you gotta try…" Adding with a smile that "even Michael Jackson had one!”

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    I wish to high heaven we could have an HBOT... but it's thousands of dollars for an hour a week. :(

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    Guest Stella

    Posted

    Yeah! I like that she is open and trying everything to help her son's autism. May I suggest, eliminating corn, soy and milk. My best wishes to her and her family.

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    Guest Le Ann Mc Creery

    Posted

    Yeah! I like that she is open and trying everything to help her son's autism. May I suggest, eliminating corn, soy and milk. My best wishes to her and her family.

    If eliminating corn, soy and milk... what diet would you suggest? My hubby was recently diagnosed with celiac and corn seems to be the basic of every gluten-free product... sorry, I'm just very new to all this... lol...

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. He has covered Health News for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. His work has appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate, among others.

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  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    This article originally appeared in the Summer 2002 edition of Celiac.coms Scott-Free newsletter.

    On June 2, 2002, hundreds of researchers traveled from all over the world to Paris, France, in order to hear the latest scientific reports on celiac disease research and to present results from their own investigations. Over the course of three days, scientists presented dozens of reports, and displayed over a hundred posters covering all aspects of celiac disease, from laboratory research on the microbiologic aspects of the disease, to quality of life issues in patients who are on the gluten-free diet.
    There were so many exciting reports presented at the conference, and the following describes the research findings from these new reports concerning the screening and clinical presentation of celiac disease, osteoporosis and osteopathy and neurological conditions.
    SCREENING ISSUES IN CELIAC DISEASE
    In order to understand how best to screen populations for celiac disease, it is important to know how celiac disease affects a portion of the population, and how it compares to similar populations in other countries.
    Mayo Clinic Retrospective Study
    Dr. Joseph Murray from the Mayo Clinic conducted a retrospective study on the population of people living in Olmsted County, Minnesota. This county has kept medical records on all of its residents for over 100 years. Dr. Murray looked at the medical records to determine which residents were diagnosed with celiac disease from 1950 to 2001. He found 82 cases of celiac disease, with 58 in females and 24 in males. The average age of diagnosis was 45. Pediatric diagnoses of celiac disease during this time period were extremely rare.
    Dr. Murray found that while the diagnosis rate of dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) remained constant over the 51 year period, the diagnosis rate of celiac disease increased from 0.8 to 9.4 per 100,000 people. He also noted that over time, adults with celiac disease were less likely to present diarrhea and weight loss as symptoms. Encouragingly, he determined that the average life expectancy for a diagnosed celiac in this community was no less than that of the normal population, despite the fact that celiac disease was often diagnosed later in life.
    What does this mean?
    The celiac disease diagnosis rate in this county is much lower than the actual incidence rates that have been reported in other studies; however, that rate has greatly increased over the past 51 years. It is also noteworthy that so few children were diagnosed with celiac disease. The analysis highlights interesting and useful information about the presentation of celiac disease in adults, and about the potential life expectancy for people with celiac disease who are diagnosed later in life.
    United States and Europe Compared
    Dr. Carlo Catassi of Ancona, Italy is currently a visiting researcher at the University of Maryland Celiac Research Center. He presented an analysis of the similarities and differences between the clinical presentations of celiac disease in the United States and Europe.
    Dr. Catassi established that the prevalence of celiac disease in the U.S. and Europe are the same and range between 0.5 to 1.0 percent of the general population. The prevalence in at-risk populations is much higher, ranging between 5 and 10 percent, and the prevalence in people with Type 1 Diabetes is approximately 5 percent in both the U.S. and Europe.
    He found that the typical (symptomatic) cases of celiac disease were less common in the U.S., and that the latent (asymptomatic) cases were much more common. Dr. Catassi stated that these differences could be due to genetic factors (for example, there are more Asians in the United States than in Europe), but are more likely due to environmental factors. He noted that infants born in the U.S. are often breastfed longer than their European counterparts. There is also a lower gluten intake in the first months of life for infants in the U.S. The timing of the introduction of cereals could help explain why many American children have somewhat milder symptoms and a more unusual presentation of the disease.
    What does this mean?
    Dr. Catassis analysis underscores the need to better educate physicians in the U.S. so that they learn to see typically atypical signs of celiac disease in children and adults. He also reinforced the importance of breastfeeding as a protective factor for children with a genetic predisposition to celiac disease, which could also improve the outlook for European children in the future.
    United States Prevalence Research
    Dr. Alessio Fasano presented a poster which outlined his recent findings that are a follow-up to his now famous 1996 blood screening study. The original study found that 1 in 250 Americans had celiac disease. It was performed using anti-gliadin antibodies (AGA), and when a blood sample tested AGA positive it was confirmed using anti-endomysial (EMA) antibody testing.
    Now that human tissue transglutaminase (tTG) testing is available, Dr. Fasano and his colleagues wanted to see if the results of their original study would be different using the tTG test. He and his colleagues tested the negative samples in the original study, and found 10 more positives using the tTG test. Two of these samples were confirmed positive when checked using the AGA antibody test. Dr. Fasano concluded that the original (1996) prevalence estimate of 1 in 250 understated the true prevalence rate, which could actually be greater than 1 in 200 Americans.
    Dr. Michelle Pietzak, a pediatric gastroenterologist at the University of California at Los Angeles, also presented a poster which described the prevalence of celiac disease in Southern California. In a study of 1,094 participants, Dr. Pietzak found that 8% of Hispanics tested positive for celiac disease. The most common symptoms presented by subjects in her study included abdominal pain, diarrhea, constipation, joint pain and chronic fatigue.
    What does this mean?
    It is important to understand that the foundation of all U.S. prevalence research on celiac disease began with the blood donor study performed by Dr. Fasano in 1996. His newly revised findings, which have been supported by at least one other major study, show that the prevalence of celiac disease in the U.S. population is much higher than originally believed, and that it could be greater than 1 in 200 people. Additionally, the California study is one of the first to establish a celiac disease prevalence figure for the Hispanic population in the U.S., and if the 8 percent figure is supported by further research it would indicate that celiac disease significantly affects Hispanic Americans.
    OSTEOPOROSIS AND OSTEOPATHY
    Dr. Julio Bai of Argentina presented important information on a condition that affects many people with celiac disease, and one that is often overlooked by physicians—osteoporosis or osteopathy (its milder form). Both children and adults with celiac disease can have low bone mineral density, and its method of treatment can have important consequences.
    Dr. Bai treats adults with bone loss, and has studied the nature of fractures and bone health in adults with celiac disease. In a case-control study of 78 celiac disease patients, Dr. Bai found that symptomatic patients were more likely to experience bone fractures than the normal population. Interestingly, he also found that patients with latent (asymptomatic) celiac disease had lower fracture rates than those with symptoms, and that the rate was equal to that of the normal population. None of the patients, however, experienced a fracture of the more serious type—in the hip, spine or shoulder, and the fractures tended to occur in their arms, legs, hands and feet.
    The doctor also discussed preliminary evidence which showed that most women with osteopathy and celiac disease who go on a gluten free diet will experience an improvement in bone density, while many men do not. There was, however, no difference found between the fracture rates of men and women.
    Dr. Bai also found that nutritional and metabolic deficiencies in patients with celiac disease and osteopathy might also contribute to fractures by weakening the muscles that surround essential bones. He added that immunological factors could also enhance or inhibit bone rebuilding, and that there is a bone-specific tissue transglutaminase (tTG) that plays a role in this process.
    What does this mean?
    It was certainly good news to hear that most people with low bone density due to celiac disease can reverse the damaging process, and if celiac-related fractures do occur they tend to be of the less serious type. Additionally, it was interesting to learn just how important a role muscle health plays in preventing celiac-related fractures.
    Osteopathy in Children
    Dr. Mora, an Italian researcher, presented data on osteopathy in children with celiac disease. His results indicate that a gluten-free diet can improve bone mass, and the effect is maintained even after 10 years. He also added that a gluten-free diet improved the overall bone metabolism of the children, and that the diet alone could cure their osteopathy.
    Osteopenia and Osteoporosis: Conditions Related to Celiac Disease
    In a chart prepared by Dr. David Sanders of the United Kingdom, data on 674 patients, 243 with osteoporosis and 431 with osteopenia, were presented. He found 10 cases of celiac disease among a mostly female population that had an average age of 53. In all ten cases, patients either had a history of iron-deficient anemia or gastrointestinal symptoms. He concluded that all patients with osteopenia or osteoporosis and a history of anemia or gastrointestinal symptoms should be screened for celiac disease.
    What does this mean?
    Dr. Sanders has identified a subset of people with osteoporosis and osteopenia that should be screened for celiac disease—those who have been anemic or have gastrointestinal symptoms. This helps physicians know when to refer patients for celiac disease screening.
    NEUROLOGICAL SYMPTOMS
    Dr. Marios Hadjivassiliou of the United Kingdom presented data on neurological symptoms and gluten sensitivity. In an eight-year study, Dr. Hadjivassiliou screened people who had neurological symptoms of unknown origin using the anti-gliadin antibody (AGA) test. He found that 57 percent of these patients had antibodies present in their blood, compared to 12 percent of healthy controls or 5 percent of patients with a neurological condition of known origin.
    From this group, he studied 158 patients with gluten sensitivity and neurological conditions of unknown origin (only 33 percent of these patients had any gastrointestinal symptoms). The most common neurological conditions in this group were ataxia, peripheral neuropathies, myopathy, and encephalopathy (very severe headache). Less common were stiff person syndrome, myelopathy and neuromyotonia.
    He noted that ataxia is not a result of vitamin deficiencies, but is instead an immune-mediated condition. Patients with ataxia have unique antibodies that are not found in patients with celiac disease. Dr. Hadjivassiliou felt that up to 30 percent of idiopathic neuropathies could be gluten-related, and that there is preliminary evidence which indicates that a gluten-free diet is helpful in cases of neuropathy and ataxia.
    What does this mean?
    It is interesting to note that Dr. Hadjivassiliou has studied gluten sensitivity and not celiac disease. The test used in this study is not specific enough to identify people who were likely to have celiac disease. However, his finding that the gluten-free diet may be helpful in people with certain types of neuropathy and ataxia opens the door for further research on these conditions in people with celiac disease.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/21/2011 - May is National Celiac Disease Awareness month, as designated by the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness (NFCA), a 501©(3) non-profit organization dedicated to raising awareness and funding for celiac disease. That means a month of official and unofficial events to promote awareness of celiac disease.
    A few of the official events scheduled for National Celiac Disease Awareness month include:
    1) Gluten-Free Food Labeling Summit
    The first annual Gluten-Free Food Labeling Summit will gather legislators, celiac disease researchers, gluten-free community leaders and food corporations as they call upon the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to enforce a standard for safe and effective labeling of gluten-free food.
    When: Wednesday, May 4, 2011
    Time: VIP Reception for sponsors, 5-8:30 p.m.
    Where: Embassy Suites Convention Center
    900 10th Street Northwest
    Washington, DC 20001
    2) #GFchat on Twitter (featuring Ask the Dietitian experts): May 10, 17, 24, 31 - Chats will take place on Tuesday evenings at 8 p.m. ET/5 p.m. PT. Those interested in participating should follow and use the hashtag #GFchat to keep the conversation in one central steam.
    3) LIVE with Jill's List: Should You Be Gluten-Free?
    May 11 - Join LIVE with Jill's List to listen to and CHAT LIVE with celiac and gluten-free experts:
    * Mark Hyman, MD - NY Times Best Selling Author and family physician
    * Alice Bast - Founder and President of the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness
    * Jill Brack - Founder of GLOW Gluten Free Cookies
    4) Celiac 60+: Meeting the Needs of the Mature Celiac
    This free online webinar will feature Veronica Alicea, M.B.A., R.D., a well-known dietetic consultant in the celiac and gluten-free fields, leading an hour-long discussion on the rising number of celiac diagnoses in the mature adult population. Wednesday, May 18th at 1 pm ET/10 am PT.
    5) Catwalk for Celiac
    All proceeds will be donated to the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness.
    When: Thursday, May 19, 2011
    Time: 6-10:30 p.m.
    Where: Fiesta Banquet Hall
    255 Route 17 S
    Wood-Ridge, NJ 07075
    Cost: $35 for students, $42 for adults
    6) Celiac Awareness Night at the Mets
    Join the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness and R.O.C.K. Long Island for Celiac Awareness Night at the Mets. The New York Mets will be taking on the Philadelphia Phillies, and catch all the action from special sections in the Left Field Landing - tickets  $35 or $20 each. Gluten-free concessions will be available.
    When: Friday, May 27, 2011
    Time: 7:10 p.m.
    Where: Citi Field
    Flushing, NY
    Corporate promotions for Celiac Disease Awareness Month include:
    7) Rudi's Unbelievably Good Gluten-Free Recipe Contest
    Submit your original gluten-free recipe using Rudi's Gluten-Free Bakery products (including their new buns and pizza crust) for the chance to win a trip to Colorado and star in an Alternative Appetites video with Dan Kohler!
    Some Important Contest Dates:
    April 18 – May 20:  Recipe submissions accepted on the recipe contest tab on the Rudi’s Gluten-Free Bakery Facebook page
    April 18 – June 6:  Online voting open to the public
    June 13:  Top 3 finalists announced
    June 24:  Top 3 finalists compete in Final Recipe Cook-Off at Restaurant 4580 in Boulder, Colorado.
    Check your local gluten-free or celiac disease support group for details on events in your area. Or get together with friends and family and create your own fun for Celiac Awareness Month!


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 09/01/2011 - The global market for food allergy and intolerance products will surpass $26 billion by 2017, according to the most recent projections from companiesandmarkets.com.
    The retail growth in foods free of gluten, wheat, lactose, cow's milk, nuts, egg, soy and ominous additives has been driven in part by increased diagnosis of digestive health conditions, growing interest for gluten-free diets, better label regulations, and tastier products.
    The United States is by far biggest market for food allergy and intolerance products. In the U.S., an estimated 10% of the population have difficulties digesting gluten.
    In addition to their popularity with celiac-disease sufferers, gluten-free foods also appeal to a wide proportion of the general population, partly because of growing concerns related wheat consumption, and to symptoms associated with celiac disease.
    The sector is also benefiting from numerous celebrities who have touted gluten-free and wheat-free diets as apart of a weight-loss and personal fitness routine.
    Others are swayed by claims that going gluten-free can help treat disorders such as autism, chronic fatigue, schizophrenia, attention deficit disorder, multiple sclerosis, migraine and fertility problems.
    At least partly in response to that fact, market for gluten-free products began to explode in 2010, with savory snacks, energy bars, baking products, chocolates, and cookies leading the way among new gluten-free products.
    One result is that consumers now have a variety of options to choose from in the baked products category, including baking mixes, breads, bagels, muffins, entrees, cakes, cookies, doughnuts, baking mixes, pastas, pizza, cereals, snack foods and soups. This, in addition to a number of new gluten-free grains, starches, flours and seeds.
    Online sites that specialize in delivering gluten-free and other specialty foods for for those with food allergies, such as The Gluten-free Mall have added upwards of a hundred new products and twenty new vendors a year, and expect those numbers to continue, according to its founder and CEO, Scott Adams.
    The report includes comprehensive marketplace information, including analysis of key players, products, and strategic activities, trends, product launches, innovation, and regulatory issues, along with historic and forecast data covering 2003-2017.


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 12/26/2011 - After five months on a gluten-free diet, top professional tennis player Andy Murray has more energy than before, a faster recovery time, and a new-found ability to wake up early, according to comments Murray made when asked by reporters.
    The Scot says that he is amazed by the energy he's gotten from his gluten-free diet. He also says that his change in eating habits is proving beneficial on the court.
    "I think there’s a bit of difference in my approach to training and the diet. I feel pretty fresh," he says.
    Playing indoors at Paris Bercy, where early starts are common, Murray said " I slept seven and a half hours after playing both singles and doubles, but still woke up feeling fresh. The diet has given me more energy."
    Does he miss eating bread and other gluten-containing favorites?
    Yes. He says that, at restaurants, "I miss being able to pick up a menu and order what I want — like bread when you're waiting for your food to come…It can be quite frustrating when everyone else is dunking their bread in olive oil or smearing it in butter."
    Still, if Murray sees anything like benefits experienced by Novak Djokovic, who credits a string of big victories to his gluten-free diet, the tennis world is in for some gluten-free excitement!
    Source:

    http://www.tennistalk.com/en/news/20111115/Murray_gets_wake-up_call_from_gluten-free_diet

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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/23/2018 - If you’re looking for a great gluten-free Mexican-style favorite that is sure to be a big hit at dinner or at your next potluck, try these green chili enchiladas with roasted cauliflower. The recipe calls for chicken, but they are just as delicious when made vegetarian using just the roasted cauliflower. Either way, these enchiladas will disappear fast. Roasted cauliflower gives these green chili chicken enchiladas a deep, smokey flavor that diners are sure to love.
    Ingredients:
    2 cans gluten-free green chili enchilada sauce (I use Hatch brand) 1 small head cauliflower, roasted and chopped 6 ounces chicken meat, browned ½ cup cotija cheese, crumbled ½ cup queso fresco, diced 1 medium onion, diced ⅓ cup green onions, minced ¼ cup radishes, sliced 1 tablespoon cooking oil 1 cup chopped cabbage, for serving ½ cup sliced cherry or grape tomatoes, for serving ¼ cup cilantro, chopped 1 dozen fresh corn tortillas  ⅔ cup oil, for softening tortillas 1 large avocado, cut into small chunks Note: For a tasty vegetarian version, just omit the chicken, double the roasted cauliflower, and prepare according to directions.
    Directions:
    Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a cast iron or ovenproof pan until hot.
    Add chicken and brown lightly on both sides. 
    Remove chicken to paper towels to cool.
     
    Cut cauliflower into small pieces and place in the oiled pan.
    Roast in oven at 350F until browned on both sides.
    Remove from the oven when tender. 
    Allow roasted cauliflower to cool.
    Chop cauliflower, or break into small pieces and set aside.
    Chop cooled chicken and set aside.
    Heat 1 inch of cooking oil in a small frying pan.
    When oil is hot, use a spatula to submerge a tortilla in the oil and leave only long enough to soften, about 10 seconds or so. 
    Remove soft tortilla to a paper towel and repeat with remaining tortillas.
    Pour enough enchilada sauce to coat the bottom of a large casserole pan.
    Dunk a tortilla into the sauce and cover both sides. Add more sauce as needed.
    Fill each tortilla with bits of chicken, cauliflower, onion, and queso fresco, and roll into shape.
    When pan is full of rolled enchiladas, top with remaining sauce.
    Cook at 350F until sauce bubbles.
    Remove and top with fresh cotija cheese and scallions.
    Serve with rice, beans, and cabbage, and garnish with avocado, cilantro, and sliced grape tomatoes.

     

    Roxanne Bracknell
    Celiac.com 06/22/2018 - The rise of food allergies means that many people are avoiding gluten in recent times. In fact, the number of Americans who have stopped eating gluten has tripled in eight years between 2009 and 2017.
    Whatever your rationale for avoiding gluten, whether its celiac disease, a sensitivity to the protein, or any other reason, it can be really hard to find suitable places to eat out. When you’re on holiday in a new and unknown environment, this can be near impossible. As awareness of celiac disease grows around the world, however, more and more cities are opening their doors to gluten-free lifestyles, none more so than the 10 locations on the list below.
    Perhaps unsurprisingly, the U.S is a hotbed of gluten-free options, with four cities making the top 10, as well as the Hawaiian island of Maui. Chicago, in particular, is a real haven of gluten-free fare, with 240 coeliac-safe eateries throughout this huge city. The super hip city of Portland also ranks highly on this list, with the capital of counterculture rich in gluten-free cuisine, with San Francisco and Denver also included. Outside of the states, several prominent European capitals also rank very highly on the list, including Prague, the picturesque and historic capital of the Czech Republic, which boasts the best-reviewed restaurants on this list.
    The Irish capital of Dublin, meanwhile, has the most gluten-free establishments, with a huge 330 to choose from, while Amsterdam and Barcelona also feature prominently thanks to their variety of top-notch gluten-free fodder.
    Finally, a special mention must go to Auckland, the sole representative of Australasia in this list, with the largest city in New Zealand rounding out the top 10 thanks to its 180 coeliacsafe eateries.
    The full top ten gluten-free cities are shown in the graphic below:
     

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/21/2018 - Would you buy a house advertised as ‘gluten-free’? Yes, there really is such a house for sale. 
    It seems a Phoenix realtor Mike D’Elena is hoping that his trendy claim will catch the eye of a buyer hungry to avoid gluten, or, at least one with a sense of humor. D’Elena said he crafted the ads as a way to “be funny and to draw attention.” The idea, D’Elena said, is to “make it memorable.” 
    Though D’Elena’s marketing seeks to capitalizes on the gluten-free trend, he knows Celiac disease is a serious health issue for some people. “[W]e’re not here to offend anybody….this is just something we're just trying to do to draw attention and do what's best for our clients," he said. 
    Still, the signs seem to be working. D'elena had fielded six offers within a few days of listing the west Phoenix home.
    "Buying can sometimes be the most stressful thing you do in your entire life so why not have some fun with it," he said. 
    What do you think? Clever? Funny?
    Read more at Arizonafamily.com.

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    Bakery On Main started in the small bakery of a natural foods market on Main Street in Glastonbury, Connecticut. Founder Michael Smulders listened when his customers with Celiac Disease would mention the lack of good tasting, gluten-free options available to them. Upon learning this, he believed that nobody should have to suffer due to any kind of food allergy or dietary need. From then on, his mission became creating delicious and fearlessly unique gluten-free products that were clean and great tasting, while still being safe for his Celiac customers!
    Premium ingredients, bakeshop delicious recipes, and happy customers were our inspiration from the beginning— and are still the cornerstones of Bakery On Main today. We are a fiercely ethical company that believes in integrity and feels that happiness and wholesome, great tasting food should be harmonious. We strive for that in everything we bake in our dedicated gluten-free facility that is GFCO Certified and SQF Level 3 Certified. We use only natural, NON-GMO Project Verified ingredients and all of our products are certified Kosher Parve, dairy and casein free, and we have recently introduced certified Organic items as well! 
    Our passion is to bake the very best products while bringing happiness to our customers, each other, and all those we meet!
    We are available during normal business hours at: 1-888-533-8118 EST.
    To learn more about us at: visit our site.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/20/2018 - Currently, the only way to manage celiac disease is to eliminate gluten from the diet. That could be set to change as clinical trials begin in Australia for a new vaccine that aims to switch off the immune response to gluten. 
    The trials are set to begin at Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre. The vaccine is designed to allow people with celiac disease to consume gluten with no adverse effects. A successful vaccine could be the beginning of the end for the gluten-free diet as the only currently viable treatment for celiac disease. That could be a massive breakthrough for people with celiac disease.
    USC’s Clinical Trials Centre Director Lucas Litewka said trial participants would receive an injection of the vaccine twice a week for seven weeks. The trials will be conducted alongside gastroenterologist Dr. James Daveson, who called the vaccine “a very exciting potential new therapy that has been undergoing clinical trials for several years now.”
    Dr. Daveson said the investigational vaccine might potentially restore gluten tolerance to people with celiac disease.The trial is open to adults between the ages of 18 and 70 who have clinically diagnosed celiac disease, and have followed a strict gluten-free diet for at least 12 months. Anyone interested in participating can go to www.joinourtrials.com.
    Read more at the website for Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre.

    Source:
    FoodProcessing.com.au