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    Jimmy Kimmel Skewers Clueless Gluten-free Dieters


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 05/13/2014 - Overall, increased awareness of celiac disease and gluten intolerance has been a good thing, right?


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    Image: Wikimedia CommonsGenerally, more people are being diagnosed, and gluten-free food options are more numerous and more widely available than ever before.

    However, all this awareness has succeeded in drawing a number of people into voluntary gluten-free dieting, often with mixed results.

    Late night television host Jimmy Kimmel recently sent a camera crew out to a local exercise spot to ask people if they were following a gluten-free diet, and to find out if they actually knew what gluten was.

    What he found was a bunch of supposedly gluten-free dieters, who were almost totally clueless about gluten, giving answers that would make most celiac patients cringe. He also got a few good laughs.

    Check out the video:

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    Guest Charlie

    Posted

    Why has no one commented on this yet? Jimmy Kimmel said he was "annoyed" by those with gluten intolerance/medical condition. Why is it acceptable to bash someone for having an illness such as celiac disease or gluten intolerance? No one bashes people for having cancer. Jimmy Kimmel should apologize to the entire celiac community for such an outlandish and nasty comment.

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    Guest fred

    Posted

    Why has no one commented on this yet? Jimmy Kimmel said he was "annoyed" by those with gluten intolerance/medical condition. Why is it acceptable to bash someone for having an illness such as celiac disease or gluten intolerance? No one bashes people for having cancer. Jimmy Kimmel should apologize to the entire celiac community for such an outlandish and nasty comment.

    It was a joke. He is a comedian. You are extremely sensitive.

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    Guest jill rosenlund

    Posted

    Why has no one commented on this yet? Jimmy Kimmel said he was "annoyed" by those with gluten intolerance/medical condition. Why is it acceptable to bash someone for having an illness such as celiac disease or gluten intolerance? No one bashes people for having cancer. Jimmy Kimmel should apologize to the entire celiac community for such an outlandish and nasty comment.

    Charlie / I completely agree. Why is gluten intolerance or coeliac disease supposed to be hilariously funny and only something that hypochondriacs obsess about. At least most of these people showed some awareness of what foods contain gluten, I do not see that it matters much if they cannot give a scientific definition. I do hope Jefferson Adams contacts the program and asks for a right of reply and skewers the Fallon ignorance and smugness.

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    Guest Susie

    Posted

    Why has no one commented on this yet? Jimmy Kimmel said he was "annoyed" by those with gluten intolerance/medical condition. Why is it acceptable to bash someone for having an illness such as celiac disease or gluten intolerance? No one bashes people for having cancer. Jimmy Kimmel should apologize to the entire celiac community for such an outlandish and nasty comment.

    I agree with Charlie! This kind of publicity keeps making it harder to be taken seriously!!

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    Guest Luann

    Posted

    Excellent article!! I have been gluten free with celiac for over 20 years and I could NOT define gluten if I had to. Of course I know I cannot eat wheat, oats, flour or barley but I could not define WHY! It is hysterical and we should be happy these people are making the gluten free products become more available to those of us that need it!!

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    Guest Olinda Paul

    Posted

    Why has no one commented on this yet? Jimmy Kimmel said he was "annoyed" by those with gluten intolerance/medical condition. Why is it acceptable to bash someone for having an illness such as celiac disease or gluten intolerance? No one bashes people for having cancer. Jimmy Kimmel should apologize to the entire celiac community for such an outlandish and nasty comment.

    Get over yourself as he was just trying to be funny, I have been gluten-free for over 18 years.

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    Guest Dawn

    Posted

    I think this I hysterical! I have celiac disease and have known since the beginning that it is the protein in wheat, rye, and barley that attacks my intestines. But I did a tremendous amount of research so I could understand it. Why is Kimmel annoyed with those with the disease? And why do people automatically adopt a diet they can't explain? That's funny!

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    Guest Kelly

    Posted

    He's no more annoyed than I am. I've been on this diet for 13 years and wish I didn't have to be. The thing that annoys me most is how my diet needs affect others in restaurants, at cookouts, and at any social occasion. I don't like to be the center of attention for this reason because its annoying to myself and others.

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    Guest tigershark29

    Posted

    Love it because it proves how clueless and idiotic the general public is about jumping on the "gluten free" bandwagon. I never expect anyone to cater to my individual needs. I just love watching people make fools of themselves!

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    Guest Chris Fsotel

    Posted

    I am gluten-free for medical reasons. I understand that Fallon is a comedian, but laughing at medical issues is beyond even my usually high level of tolerance of other people's ignorance and insensitivity. True there are a lot of people who do not understand gluten sensitivity, laugh at them. Do not look for laughs at the expense of those who are sick with what can be a life threatening illness.

     

    For those who don't know gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye and barley. In some people the protein triggers an allergic reactions that destroys the cilia in the intestines -- a disease known as celiac disease; named for Celia who first described the disease accurately around 800 BC. Unfortunately, scientists only discovered the cause of celiac disease around 1995. My father might not have died when a was 13 years old had there been more of an understanding in 1964. The result is a range of reactions including cramping, diarrhea, flatulence, bloating, nausea. Currently the only way to reliably diagnose the disease and identify who is allergic to gluten is to wait for the symptoms to drive a person to a doctor. The pain can range from mild to completely debilitating and the need to find a rest room in a hurry can be humiliating and failing to find one can be very nasty. Since the intestine is not working correctly, severe celiac disease can lead to starvation no matter how much food you eat. In the long run the disease, no matter how mild or severe, can lead to greatly increased risk of intestinal and colon cancer and premature death.

     

    I also love pizza and fried chicken and beer. I would love to sit down with Jimmy Fallon an have a gluten pig out. But, he must stay in the same room with me to discover the results of my eating gluten. He will know within the hour that I am not joking when I say I must eat a gluten free diet for my comfort and the comfort of anyone near me.

     

    Quite a laughable situation no matter how 'sensitive' you are, don't you think?

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    Why has no one commented on this yet? Jimmy Kimmel said he was "annoyed" by those with gluten intolerance/medical condition. Why is it acceptable to bash someone for having an illness such as celiac disease or gluten intolerance? No one bashes people for having cancer. Jimmy Kimmel should apologize to the entire celiac community for such an outlandish and nasty comment.

    I agree with you Charlie - this is no 'joke' to those who have the slightest crumb and get very, very ill. Everyone is affected differently, but I wouldn't wish those cramps and the pain on my worst enemy.

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    Guest Cindy

    Posted

    Sometimes I get irritated with my friends when they ask me stupid questions. "Can you eat potatoes or meat?". I just want to get sarcastic and say is there wheat in potatoes or meat? But I don't. I had one person who said she was going to go gluten free and then asked me what it was.

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    Guest Jean Mascarenhas

    Posted

    You and many others in these reviews are confusing Jimmy Kimmel on whose show this was aired with Jimmy Fallon who is a different comedian!

    Agree that there is no need to be so sensitive. It is COMEDY! And funny that so many people without reason nor any knowledge of what it is, go on a gluten-free diet. Just a Fad.

    Gluten is the protein gliadin found in grains like wheat, rye, barley. There is still research being done to on oats as it may just be the fact that it is contaminated, so may be okay to have non gluten-free oats but it is still being debated.

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    Guest Sharon

    Posted

    Why has no one commented on this yet? Jimmy Kimmel said he was "annoyed" by those with gluten intolerance/medical condition. Why is it acceptable to bash someone for having an illness such as celiac disease or gluten intolerance? No one bashes people for having cancer. Jimmy Kimmel should apologize to the entire celiac community for such an outlandish and nasty comment.

    I agree that it was insensitive. I had a server use the same word when I was trying to order a salad without gluten. She actually said to me any salad could be made gluten free, it's just annoying. Granted, she was 17 years old, but I still gave her a tongue lashing! So sorry that my disease annoys you Jimmy. HAVING the disease is what's annoying and people should be kinder. Jokes about it bother me.

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    Guest Terri

    Posted

    I have been gluten-free for 10 years. Jimmy Kimmel is a funny man and his sketch made me laugh. Why have we as a society become so sensitive? Loosen up, laugh at yourself. Don't take things so seriously. We're all in this together!

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    Guest Jacqie

    Posted

    I don't mind this at all. People who have jumped on the "gluten free" bandwagon because it's the news "diet craze" are making my celiac life so much more difficult. They SHOULD be ridiculed for having no idea what they are doing. At least understand it! When I go into restaurants now, I have to be more specific than ever before, since I encounter so many "gluten free menus." My standard pitch now is "I have celiac disease. I must have gluten free food. This is not a lifestyle choice." The servers are clueless and I have to ask to speak to the manager. Still, I get glutened more often than not. So thanks for making my serious food disability into a dismissible fad. That's. Just. Great. Morons.

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    Guest Teresa

    Posted

    I'm dittoing Jacquie's remarks. She captured my sentiments exactly.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. He has covered Health News for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. His work has appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate, among others.

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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/18/2018 - Celiac disease has been mainly associated with Caucasian populations in Northern Europe, and their descendants in other countries, but new scientific evidence is beginning to challenge that view. Still, the exact global prevalence of celiac disease remains unknown.  To get better data on that issue, a team of researchers recently conducted a comprehensive review and meta-analysis to get a reasonably accurate estimate the global prevalence of celiac disease. 
    The research team included P Singh, A Arora, TA Strand, DA Leffler, C Catassi, PH Green, CP Kelly, V Ahuja, and GK Makharia. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Lady Hardinge Medical College, New Delhi, India; Innlandet Hospital Trust, Lillehammer, Norway; Centre for International Health, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Gastroenterology Research and Development, Takeda Pharmaceuticals Inc, Cambridge, MA; Department of Pediatrics, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy; Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; USA Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; and the Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.
    For their review, the team searched Medline, PubMed, and EMBASE for the keywords ‘celiac disease,’ ‘celiac,’ ‘tissue transglutaminase antibody,’ ‘anti-endomysium antibody,’ ‘endomysial antibody,’ and ‘prevalence’ for studies published from January 1991 through March 2016. 
    The team cross-referenced each article with the words ‘Asia,’ ‘Europe,’ ‘Africa,’ ‘South America,’ ‘North America,’ and ‘Australia.’ They defined celiac diagnosis based on European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition guidelines. The team used 96 articles of 3,843 articles in their final analysis.
    Overall global prevalence of celiac disease was 1.4% in 275,818 individuals, based on positive blood tests for anti-tissue transglutaminase and/or anti-endomysial antibodies. The pooled global prevalence of biopsy-confirmed celiac disease was 0.7% in 138,792 individuals. That means that numerous people with celiac disease potentially remain undiagnosed.
    Rates of celiac disease were 0.4% in South America, 0.5% in Africa and North America, 0.6% in Asia, and 0.8% in Europe and Oceania; the prevalence was 0.6% in female vs 0.4% males. Celiac disease was significantly more common in children than adults.
    This systematic review and meta-analysis showed celiac disease to be reported worldwide. Blood test data shows celiac disease rate of 1.4%, while biopsy data shows 0.7%. The prevalence of celiac disease varies with sex, age, and location. 
    This review demonstrates a need for more comprehensive population-based studies of celiac disease in numerous countries.  The 1.4% rate indicates that there are 91.2 million people worldwide with celiac disease, and 3.9 million are in the U.S.A.
    Source:
    Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018 Jun;16(6):823-836.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2017.06.037.