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    Judge Tosses Hasselbeck Plagiarism Suit, Woman Sues Again!


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 12/02/2009 - It's off-again, on-again for the plagiarism lawsuit against Elisabeth Hasselbeck, co-host of TV's The View.


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    Recently, a judge dismissed a plagiarism suit against Elisabeth Hasselbeck for her book called The gluten-free Diet: A Gluten-Free Survival Guide. The judge threw out the original complaint because a rival celiac disease author, Susan Hassett, failed to provide supporting documentation for her claim.

    Barely two weeks later, Hassett, author of the self-published, Living With Celiac Disease author, has filed a second lawsuit, in U.S. District Court in Massachusetts, alleging copyright infringement. Hasselbeck's book is published by Center Street press, and made the New York Times Bestseller list.

    Hassett contends that the judged tossed her first plagiarism suit on a technicality, and that this time, she has included ample evidence to support her claim that Hasselbeck stole from her her "scrupulously researched" book.

    For her part, Hasselbeck has called the charge of plagiarism and copyright infringement "baseless." In addition to the plagiarism charge, Hassett has added an allegation that Hasselbeck includes information in her book that is "misleading and dangerous" to Celiac Disease sufferers.

    Hassett claims that she sent a copy of her book to Hasselbeck well before Hasselbeck's book was released, and that Hasselbeck has wrongly borrowed from Hassett's book. Whether Hasselbeck's ghostwriter ever saw the book remains unknown.

    Stay tuned for updates on this intriguing and ever-changing story.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. He has covered Health News for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. His work has appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate, among others.

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    Scott Adams
    The following is a post by Donald D. Kasarda (kasarda@pw.usda.gov) that was written to Michael Coupland of Kellogg (Cereal Company).
    Dear Michael,
    I have been asked to comment on your reply to Bev Lewis about the absence of gluten (or the barley equivalent) in malt flavoring. I am a cereal chemist who is sometimes asked for advice in regard to the gluten proteins as they relate to celiac disease by celiac patient organizations. I have provided advice to Kellogg in the past in regard to safe processing of a rice cereal (Kenmei) in order to avoid contamination. Kenmei has since been discontinued by the company.
    While it is possible that the malt flavoring you refer to is free of all harmful peptides, your statement that because the flavoring is a water wash of malt, it is free of gluten, is not in itself completely satisfying for the following reasons.
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    By Kelly Rohlfs Celiac.com 09/29/2004 - The Childrens Digestive Health and Nutrition Foundation (CDHNF) with the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN) announced the launch of a new educational campaign on Celiac Disease, one of the most common genetic digestive conditions possibly affecting as many as three million Americans (up to 1 percent). Since it has been proven that early detection and intervention can prevent long-term consequences, CDHNF and NASPGHAN are focusing on accurate and timely diagnosis and treatment in children.
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 08/17/2011 - Gluten-free eating is playing a key role in the diets of major A-list celebrities. Among them, Lady Gaga, Russell Crowe, and Jennifer Esposito all have made gluten-free eating a major part of their health and diet routines.
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/07/2014 - Our latest gluten-free celebrity news comes with word from eon line.com that actress Jennifer Esposito has sparked a bit of a dustup with Rachael Ray over an episode of Ray's 3 in the Bag that aired earlier this month on Food Network, in which Ray shared some favorite gluten-free recipes.
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/23/2018 - If you’re looking for a great gluten-free Mexican-style favorite that is sure to be a big hit at dinner or at your next potluck, try these green chili enchiladas with roasted cauliflower. The recipe calls for chicken, but they are just as delicious when made vegetarian using just the roasted cauliflower. Either way, these enchiladas will disappear fast. Roasted cauliflower gives these green chili chicken enchiladas a deep, smokey flavor that diners are sure to love.
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    Roxanne Bracknell
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/21/2018 - Would you buy a house advertised as ‘gluten-free’? Yes, there really is such a house for sale. 
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/20/2018 - Currently, the only way to manage celiac disease is to eliminate gluten from the diet. That could be set to change as clinical trials begin in Australia for a new vaccine that aims to switch off the immune response to gluten. 
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