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    Kourtney Kardashian Takes Her Family Gluten-free


    Jefferson Adams
    Image Caption: Photo: CC--FloridaSouthBeachPhotos

    Celiac.com 09/30/2016 - This week in celebrity gluten-free news, Kourtney Kardashian has put her family on a gluten-free, dairy-free diet.


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    The 37-year-old reality star explained on her website how she made the diet change after undergoing muscle testing, an alternative medicine technique that has been widely discredited by science and medical professionals. The reality star wrote: "I don't think everyone needs to eat this way, but we had muscle testing done, which showed we all have sensitivities to corn, gluten and dairy."

    Kourtney Kardashian says she has "noticed a great positive change in behavior" when her kids stick to a gluten- and dairy-free diet. She even offers her own personal tip for maintaining gluten-free harmony: Bring your own cupcakes to birthday parties, so gluten-free kids can still enjoy the food and fun.

    No word on whether sister Kim and her partner Kanye West or their kids will be joining the gluten-free push anytime soon.

    Stay tuned for updates on these and other related stories of gluten-free celebrities, both with and without celiac disease and/or related conditions.

    Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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    Guest Rhiannon

    Posted

    Are you seriously talking about this on a CELIAC website? I thought you had better taste than that. This is what makes gluten free a ´trend´ and ´cool´ and disregards the seriously of CELIAC DISEASE. This disgusts me to no end! I have lost all respect for your website and I hope you're happy that you're getting traffic to your site for this, because it seems that's all you care about and not what's really important.

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    What does this have to do with Celiac??? She is a Fad Dieter. This belongs in magazine at the register in the supermarket, NOT on Celiac.Com.. She is not a Celiac nor does she have Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity.

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    I expect more out of a website that is celiac.com. Why are we reporting about some celebrity that isn't even celiac? I'm very disappointed that a website I felt was reputable would post something like this.

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    What does this have to do with Celiac??? She is a Fad Dieter. This belongs in magazine at the register in the supermarket, NOT on Celiac.Com.. She is not a Celiac nor does she have Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity.

    We disagree--anytime famous people go gluten-free, for any reason, it is news to our visitors, and it will drive more companies and restaurants to create gluten-free products and menus--which will help all celiacs.

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    I expect more out of a website that is celiac.com. Why are we reporting about some celebrity that isn't even celiac? I'm very disappointed that a website I felt was reputable would post something like this.

    We have never had a "celiacs only" for our news coverage. We have always covered all topics that affect celiacs, including stars who go gluten-free, no matter their reasons.

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    Are you seriously talking about this on a CELIAC website? I thought you had better taste than that. This is what makes gluten free a ´trend´ and ´cool´ and disregards the seriously of CELIAC DISEASE. This disgusts me to no end! I have lost all respect for your website and I hope you're happy that you're getting traffic to your site for this, because it seems that's all you care about and not what's really important.

    I'm sorry that you just discovered that we cover all types of news related to the expanding popularity of the gluten-free diet...Celiac.com has always done this, and will continue to do so.

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    Guest Gluten Dude

    Posted

    We disagree--anytime famous people go gluten-free, for any reason, it is news to our visitors, and it will drive more companies and restaurants to create gluten-free products and menus--which will help all celiacs.

    Wow...you could not be more wrong. When I was first diagnosed, I relied on your site for information and a sense of community. Now you promote items that are not proven safe for celiac, talk gossip, etc. What happened?

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    Very disappointed. Not sure how this will help those (like my son) with celiac disease. This will only give material to late night comedians.

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    This will NOT "drive more companies and restaurants to create gluten-free products and menus--which will help all celiacs." It will make even more servers and restaurant owners not take celiacs seriously when we try to eat in their restaurants. I was at Red Robin last night, watching my daughter eat and the server and I had a real conversation about why I wasn't eating. He remarked that he believed me, but he usually doesn't believe anyone requesting gluten free because they usually insist on using the salt at the table, even when warned that it contains gluten. "Poser Celiacs" is what he and his colleges call those people. So your posting this frivolous news item just gives the Kardashians more exposure and brings your rating as a serious website way down. Nope. This was a bad idea.

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    Zero legitimacy after this post, that's really just a re/post of the daily news. Thanks, I won't be returning to celiac.com for any info.

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    We disagree--anytime famous people go gluten-free, for any reason, it is news to our visitors, and it will drive more companies and restaurants to create gluten-free products and menus--which will help all celiacs.

    But it won't drive companies or restaurants to create truly safe products, if they see it as fad and not a true health/disease issue.

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    Guest Celiac Gal

    Posted

    I was diagnosed celiac and therefore gluten free when it was impossible to find anything gluten-free (12 years ago), much less anything GOOD that was gluten-free. If celebs and "fad dieters" help drive the market to increase better tasting, more cost effective, better labeled, and more readily available gluten-free product, where's the harm? Yes, we need to still advocate for the disease, but getting panties in a wad over folk who help make our lives easier is not the way to go about it.

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    But it won't drive companies or restaurants to create truly safe products, if they see it as fad and not a true health/disease issue.

    There is zero evidence to support this assertion. More restaurants than ever now offer gluten-free options, and it has always been a fact, even long before the fad aspect of the GFD, that eating out is risky...it wasn't safer to eat out 10 years ago that it is now, there are just more options now, but you still have to be just as careful.

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    Zero legitimacy after this post, that's really just a re/post of the daily news. Thanks, I won't be returning to celiac.com for any info.

    Nice that this story got you to stop by...sorry to see you go!

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    This will NOT "drive more companies and restaurants to create gluten-free products and menus--which will help all celiacs." It will make even more servers and restaurant owners not take celiacs seriously when we try to eat in their restaurants. I was at Red Robin last night, watching my daughter eat and the server and I had a real conversation about why I wasn't eating. He remarked that he believed me, but he usually doesn't believe anyone requesting gluten free because they usually insist on using the salt at the table, even when warned that it contains gluten. "Poser Celiacs" is what he and his colleges call those people. So your posting this frivolous news item just gives the Kardashians more exposure and brings your rating as a serious website way down. Nope. This was a bad idea.

    15 years ago your server at Red Robin would likely have had no idea what you were talking about when asked about gluten-free food...now they do. Celiac.com has always covered celiac and gluten-free related news, including news related to celebrities.

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    Very disappointed. Not sure how this will help those (like my son) with celiac disease. This will only give material to late night comedians.

    Good...the more late night comedians bring up "gluten-free" the better! Raising awareness is the point here.

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    Wow...you could not be more wrong. When I was first diagnosed, I relied on your site for information and a sense of community. Now you promote items that are not proven safe for celiac, talk gossip, etc. What happened?

    We've always covered celebrities and gluten-free stories about them Gluten Dude...where have you been? Our community is here and going strong...glad you dropped by!

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    I think people forget how little information was available just 10 years ago, and if some people learn about their problem with gluten because a star talks about it how can that be bad?

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    So I had testing the way Kourtney did. When we were done, my genius naturopath had me try going gluten free for a week. This was 1997. There are so many blogs and cookbooks now. My first attempt at gluten-free bread didn't look like bread, and it,was dense and heavy. I ended up turning the alleged bread into croutons. Honestly, I love hearing how people make a decision to see how to live gluten-free. I enjoyed the article.

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    What's with all the haters? I have celiac disease, and I think anything that draws attention to the health benefits of a gluten-free diet is helpful and gets restaurants thinking about ways to serve the gluten-free community.

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    Gluten has zero health benefits and everyone will be healthier gluten free. If a world famous celebrity brings attention to a gluten free lifestyle where is the harm. Everyone should be gluten free.

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    Guest Adonna

    Posted

    And it doesn't help you decided to post a picture of her scantily dressed to promote this site. The tone of this site had decidedly gone to sensationalism instead of providing information. I have been celiac for over 20 years and it is not a fad.

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    And it doesn't help you decided to post a picture of her scantily dressed to promote this site. The tone of this site had decidedly gone to sensationalism instead of providing information. I have been celiac for over 20 years and it is not a fad.

    Celiac.com has never published more in-depth articles on celiac disease research and information on the gluten-free diet than we do now...thanks in large part to our advertisers who support our site's content. A quick glance at the last 20 articles published on our home page will back this up. Again, we've always published articles on celebrities, especially ones that have over 21 million Twitter followers and announce that their whole family is going gluten-free, as was the case here.

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    Guest Siobhan Coplin

    Posted

    We disagree--anytime famous people go gluten-free, for any reason, it is news to our visitors, and it will drive more companies and restaurants to create gluten-free products and menus--which will help all celiacs.

    The more people the better as then the prices will come down and the choice of products will get better. The price of the food is way to high.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. He has covered Health News for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. His work has appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate, among others.

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