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    Lady Gaga to Russell Crowe: Major Stars Go Gluten-free to Shed Pounds, Shape Bodies


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 08/17/2011 - Gluten-free eating is playing a key role in the diets of major A-list celebrities. Among them, Lady Gaga, Russell Crowe, and Jennifer Esposito all have made gluten-free eating a major part of their health and diet routines.


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    Russell Crowe has reportedly dropped more than 16 pounds by following a strict exercise regime and eating a diet that is largely gluten-free.

    In mid-June, Crowe, 47, launched a 105 day plan to tone up and shed weight. He has made gluten-free food a major part of that effort and seems well on his way to dropping the 41-pounds he hopes to lose.

    Crowe's Twitter page contains this update on his success:
    '220lbs this morning, started at 236.4 lbs. 45 min walk, 12 mins eliptical, weighted objects 40 mins, walk 25 mins. 2400 cal a day maximum, all meals & all beverages. Where possible gluten free.'

    Catch up on the latest gluten-free news for Russell Crowe.

    Meanwhile, speaking of the usual food spread for Lady Gaga and her dancers, Lady Gaga’s choreographer and creative director, Laurieann Gibson says “It’s like gluten free, tuna, protein. There’s no M&M’s, there’s no gummy bears. There’s cheese, there’s water, there’s fruit, there’s vegetables – the only indulgence might be the cheese and grape platter. But other than that, it’s like wheat crisps.” Let's hope she means gluten-free 'wheat' crisps.

    Lady Gaga. Photo: Wiki Commons - Daniel Åhs KarlssonGibson goes on to say that Lady Gaga doesn’t just focus on her own diet, but that she expects her dancers to follow her regimen as well. Lady Gaga, Gibson adds, is a workaholic, and "doesn’t want gluten and bread bloating or weighing down her dancers."

    “All the dancers are now gluten free,” Gibson tells OK! - including gluten free desserts.

    In case you're wondering if the gluten-free diet alone is enough to keep Lady Gaga's body in peak form, it is not. In addition to eating a healthy, gluten-free diet, the singing star works out for hours, including dancing or doing yoga to keep her body toned.

    So maybe all of us who are already proudly gluten-free just need our own personal trainer to turn that last corner to stardom. Read more about Lady Gaga's gluten-free diet.

    Also, actress Jennifer Esposito recently detailed the story of her own battles with gluten-intolerance and her ultimate victory by adopting a gluten-free diet. Read the whole story of Jennifer Esposito's gluten-free story.

    These are just a few of the Hollywood celebrities who have found benefit in going gluten-free. One thing these stories help to reinforce is that many people, famous and not-famous alike, are sensitive to gluten, and those who are sensitive benefit tremendously adopting a gluten-free diet.

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    Going gluten-free does NOT make you lose weight. In fact, as a person with celiac disease, I don't recommend it unless it is a medical necessity. If you eat the same amount of a gluten-free product as you would a regular product (like pasta) you get almost double the calories. Over an extended period of time of eating high glycemic index foods, you will develop diabetes. Notice that we are talking about two stars here, both of whom have nothing better to do than work out like fiends for half of their lives, and most likely have private chefs. I wouldn't be surprised if these two were just doing this because they want to be "trendy". These two have no clue of what they are doing, so they shouldn't be glorified for their "diet results" that are not the product of being "gluten free".

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    Going gluten-free does NOT make you lose weight. In fact, as a person with celiac disease, I don't recommend it unless it is a medical necessity. If you eat the same amount of a gluten-free product as you would a regular product (like pasta) you get almost double the calories. Over an extended period of time of eating high glycemic index foods, you will develop diabetes. Notice that we are talking about two stars here, both of whom have nothing better to do than work out like fiends for half of their lives, and most likely have private chefs. I wouldn't be surprised if these two were just doing this because they want to be "trendy". These two have no clue of what they are doing, so they shouldn't be glorified for their "diet results" that are not the product of being "gluten free".

    Did you consider the idea that perhaps they are not replacing the gluten-containing items, or perhaps they are replacing them with healthier versions?

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    Guest Sonya Coover

    Posted

    I have to agree with Pat. I've been gluten free for over 5 years and I actually gained weight in the beginning by eating gluten free versions of deserts, breads, and pastas. The are indeed more calorie laden. I have since lost 30 lbs and kept it off for the past year but that was due to eliminating sugar, starchy foods high in carbs, eating only meats, fish, fruits and vegetables. I also walk 3 to 4 miles each day and initially worked with a trainer for the first 6 mos. If people eliminate sugar, salt, high carb foods and exercise every day they will be healthier and lose weight. Going gluten free has nothing to do with it!

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    I have a lot of reservations about the promotion of the gluten-free diet by celebrities. The problem with them adopting and promoting a gluten free diet when it isn't medically necessary is that, rather than raising awareness of celiac disease, they simply make the diet trendy. This results in many restaurants and other food service establishments offering "gluten-free" items, which, in fact are not truly gluten-free as no precautions have been taken to ensure that there is no cross-contamination, making these products dangerous for unsuspecting celiacs. As a classic example of this, I had quite the argument with the owner of a local bakery and restaurant who offers some "gluten-free!" (exclamation mark his) bakery items in both establishments. When I asked what precautions were taken against cross-contamination, I was told that it was impossible to take any, as there was "flour everywhere" in the bakery. In spite of this, he insisted that he was quite correct in labelling the items as gluten free, as none of their ingredients contained gluten, and, in a further example of his lack of understanding of the reasons one has to folow a gluten free diet, added, "Well, if you are "THAT sensitive, then don't eat them".

    Those who follow a "gluten-free" diet because some celebrities do, or it is trendy, or because they think they will lose weight either aren't aware of, or don't care about, cross-contamination. Promoting gluten-free without a proper understanding of all the ramifications is irresponsible.

    The people who are losing weight while sort of following the diet are most likely doing so because they are also exercising more and focusing on fruits, veggies and protein. If they are simply replacing some foods with gluten free ones, as Pat pointed out, they are actually eating foods with higher fat and more calories; hardly a recipe for weight loss.

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    Guest Maureen

    Posted

    Why would you go on a gluten-free diet if you didn't need to? Not only is it an expensive diet because gluten-free foods cost more, but it is also fattening! Jennifer Esposito does have a problem with gluten obviously, but Russell Crowe and Lady GaGa are just trying to be trendy. People don't understand that some of us need to be on a gluten-free diet or we get very ill. It's not a choice, it's a necessity.

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    Guest CeliBelli

    Posted

    Eating "largely gluten-free" and "where possible gluten free" isn't living a gluten-free diet. Low carb maybe, but not gluten-free. Jennifer Esposito has a compelling story with which those of us with celiac disease can empathize. I cannot sympathize, however, with Russell Crowe or Lady Gaga, whose handlers are tossing around the term as freely as they once did "South Beach."

     

    I don't really know what the point of this story is, quite frankly, and why it is in this newsletter. "Lose pounds, shape bodies"? Seriously? If I want to read about the latest diet fads of the stars, I'll catch it in line at the grocery store. That's not why I read the Celiac.com Update.

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    Guest realistic

    Posted

    Going gluten-free does NOT make you lose weight. In fact, as a person with celiac disease, I don't recommend it unless it is a medical necessity. If you eat the same amount of a gluten-free product as you would a regular product (like pasta) you get almost double the calories. Over an extended period of time of eating high glycemic index foods, you will develop diabetes. Notice that we are talking about two stars here, both of whom have nothing better to do than work out like fiends for half of their lives, and most likely have private chefs. I wouldn't be surprised if these two were just doing this because they want to be "trendy". These two have no clue of what they are doing, so they shouldn't be glorified for their "diet results" that are not the product of being "gluten free".

    Going glutenfree is not just a complicated diet, but it is a much healthier way of living, you make everything from scratch, therefore you know exactly what nutrients to choose from - gluten isn't good for anyone - almost everybody who tries avoiding gluten will feel a big difference in their health. So it's not so strange that this is something that star coaches will start to adapt. One of the most successful biking teams in Tour de France has already skipped gluten and milk from their diets for the very same reasons.

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    Guest klbrowser

    Posted

    I lost 40 pounds the first year I was gluten free. The reason I was overweight was because I was malnourished and my body had gone into "starvation" mode, hanging onto every pound. But once I got rid of the gluten, I was able to process nutrients properly and my weight normalized. The excess weight never returned, and it has been seven years now. I have no personal trainer and can do little exercise due to other medical conditions.

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    Uhm, I have a feeling these celebs weight loss is due more to the their grueling workouts rather than their "gluten-free" diets.

     

    Also it sounds like they are having very few carbs period. Eliminating bread from your diet, goes a long way to eliminating gluten, but it doesn't make a "gluten-free diet"

    Now the Jennifer Eposito story/link sounds like a compelling story!

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    Guest hailey

    Posted

    I think what's going on is more or less ignorance to facts. The stars are taking out gluten and glucose, cutting down on the typical foods that contain them like the breads and pastas, etc. and not replacing them with gluten-free versions, but replacing them with fruits and vegetables. They are labeling it mainly gluten-free instead of carbohydrate-free. It does sound healthier, I suppose, not as worn-out as "carb free". That's just a little bit of my opinion.

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    Guest Diane Myslinski

    Posted

    Going gluten-free does NOT make you lose weight. In fact, as a person with celiac disease, I don't recommend it unless it is a medical necessity. If you eat the same amount of a gluten-free product as you would a regular product (like pasta) you get almost double the calories. Over an extended period of time of eating high glycemic index foods, you will develop diabetes. Notice that we are talking about two stars here, both of whom have nothing better to do than work out like fiends for half of their lives, and most likely have private chefs. I wouldn't be surprised if these two were just doing this because they want to be "trendy". These two have no clue of what they are doing, so they shouldn't be glorified for their "diet results" that are not the product of being "gluten free".

    I agree with you. They probably don't realize that gluten is in other products such as soda, condiments, and preservatives. It is a hard diet to follow so just not eating bread is not going to put you on a gluten free diet. How about all the food they eat and they don't know there is gluten in it. I'm sure the alcohol they drink contains a great deal of gluten in it. So stars make sure you know what is gluten free or not before you acknowledge you are on a "gluten free" diet. I'm sure you eat some sweets also. How about that birthday cake or those donuts which have gluten. For a complete list of gluten free products you need to read every label carefully. You are just touching the surface with gluten free foods unless you have a diet from a doctor and those aren't even fool proof. I agree with the above posting. The loss of weight doesn't come from the diet it comes from the nutrients you lose from foods you cannot eat.

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    Dr. Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.
    Celiac.com 06/15/2018 - There seems to be widespread agreement in the published medical research reports that stuttering is driven by abnormalities in the brain. Sometimes these are the result of brain injuries resulting from a stroke. Other types of brain injuries can also result in stuttering. Patients with Parkinson’s disease who were treated with stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus, an area of the brain that regulates some motor functions, experienced a return or worsening of stuttering that improved when the stimulation was turned off (1). Similarly, stroke has also been reported in association with acquired stuttering (2). While there are some reports of psychological mechanisms underlying stuttering, a majority of reports seem to favor altered brain morphology and/or function as the root of stuttering (3). Reports of structural differences between the brain hemispheres that are absent in those who do not stutter are also common (4). About 5% of children stutter, beginning sometime around age 3, during the phase of speech acquisition. However, about 75% of these cases resolve without intervention, before reaching their teens (5). Some cases of aphasia, a loss of speech production or understanding, have been reported in association with damage or changes to one or more of the language centers of the brain (6). Stuttering may sometimes arise from changes or damage to these same language centers (7). Thus, many stutterers have abnormalities in the same regions of the brain similar to those seen in aphasia.
    So how, you may ask, is all this related to gluten? As a starting point, one report from the medical literature identifies a patient who developed aphasia after admission for severe diarrhea. By the time celiac disease was diagnosed, he had completely lost his faculty of speech. However, his speech and normal bowel function gradually returned after beginning a gluten free diet (8). This finding was so controversial at the time of publication (1988) that the authors chose to remain anonymous. Nonetheless, it is a valuable clue that suggests gluten as a factor in compromised speech production. At about the same time (late 1980’s) reports of connections between untreated celiac disease and seizures/epilepsy were emerging in the medical literature (9).
    With the advent of the Internet a whole new field of anecdotal information was emerging, connecting a variety of neurological symptoms to celiac disease. While many medical practitioners and researchers were casting aspersions on these assertions, a select few chose to explore such claims using scientific research designs and methods. While connections between stuttering and gluten consumption seem to have been overlooked by the medical research community, there is a rich literature on the Internet that cries out for more structured investigation of this connection. Conversely, perhaps a publication bias of the peer review process excludes work that explores this connection.
    Whatever the reason that stuttering has not been reported in the medical literature in association with gluten ingestion, a number of personal disclosures and comments suggesting a connection between gluten and stuttering can be found on the Internet. Abid Hussain, in an article about food allergy and stuttering said: “The most common food allergy prevalent in stutterers is that of gluten which has been found to aggravate the stutter” (10). Similarly, Craig Forsythe posted an article that includes five cases of self-reporting individuals who believe that their stuttering is or was connected to gluten, one of whom also experiences stuttering from foods containing yeast (11). The same site contains one report of a stutterer who has had no relief despite following a gluten free diet for 20 years (11). Another stutterer, Jay88, reports the complete disappearance of her/his stammer on a gluten free diet (12). Doubtless there are many more such anecdotes to be found on the Internet* but we have to question them, exercising more skepticism than we might when reading similar claims in a peer reviewed scientific or medical journal.
    There are many reports in such journals connecting brain and neurological ailments with gluten, so it is not much of a stretch, on that basis alone, to suspect that stuttering may be a symptom of the gluten syndrome. Rodney Ford has even characterized celiac disease as an ailment that may begin through gluten-induced neurological damage (13) and Marios Hadjivassiliou and his group of neurologists and neurological investigators have devoted considerable time and effort to research that reveals gluten as an important factor in a majority of neurological diseases of unknown origin (14) which, as I have pointed out previously, includes most neurological ailments.
    My own experience with stuttering is limited. I stuttered as a child when I became nervous, upset, or self-conscious. Although I have been gluten free for many years, I haven’t noticed any impact on my inclination to stutter when upset. I don’t know if they are related, but I have also had challenges with speaking when distressed and I have noticed a substantial improvement in this area since removing gluten from my diet. Nonetheless, I have long wondered if there is a connection between gluten consumption and stuttering. Having done the research for this article, I would now encourage stutterers to try a gluten free diet for six months to see if it will reduce or eliminate their stutter. Meanwhile, I hope that some investigator out there will research this matter, publish her findings, and start the ball rolling toward getting some definitive answers to this question.
    Sources:
    1. Toft M, Dietrichs E. Aggravated stuttering following subthalamic deep brain stimulation in Parkinson’s disease--two cases. BMC Neurol. 2011 Apr 8;11:44.
    2. Tani T, Sakai Y. Stuttering after right cerebellar infarction: a case study. J Fluency Disord. 2010 Jun;35(2):141-5. Epub 2010 Mar 15.
    3. Lundgren K, Helm-Estabrooks N, Klein R. Stuttering Following Acquired Brain Damage: A Review of the Literature. J Neurolinguistics. 2010 Sep 1;23(5):447-454.
    4. Jäncke L, Hänggi J, Steinmetz H. Morphological brain differences between adult stutterers and non-stutterers. BMC Neurol. 2004 Dec 10;4(1):23.
    5. Kell CA, Neumann K, von Kriegstein K, Posenenske C, von Gudenberg AW, Euler H, Giraud AL. How the brain repairs stuttering. Brain. 2009 Oct;132(Pt 10):2747-60. Epub 2009 Aug 26.
    6. Galantucci S, Tartaglia MC, Wilson SM, Henry ML, Filippi M, Agosta F, Dronkers NF, Henry RG, Ogar JM, Miller BL, Gorno-Tempini ML. White matter damage in primary progressive aphasias: a diffusion tensor tractography study. Brain. 2011 Jun 11.
    7. Lundgren K, Helm-Estabrooks N, Klein R. Stuttering Following Acquired Brain Damage: A Review of the Literature. J Neurolinguistics. 2010 Sep 1;23(5):447-454.
    8. [No authors listed] Case records of the Massachusetts General Hospital. Weekly clinicopathological exercises. Case 43-1988. A 52-year-old man with persistent watery diarrhea and aphasia. N Engl J Med. 1988 Oct 27;319(17):1139-48
    9. Molteni N, Bardella MT, Baldassarri AR, Bianchi PA. Celiac disease associated with epilepsy and intracranial calcifications: report of two patients. Am J Gastroenterol. 1988 Sep;83(9):992-4.
    10. http://ezinearticles.com/?Food-Allergy-and-Stuttering-Link&id=1235725 
    11. http://www.craig.copperleife.com/health/stuttering_allergies.htm 
    12. https://www.celiac.com/forums/topic/73362-any-help-is-appreciated/
    13. Ford RP. The gluten syndrome: a neurological disease. Med Hypotheses. 2009 Sep;73(3):438-40. Epub 2009 Apr 29.
    14. Hadjivassiliou M, Gibson A, Davies-Jones GA, Lobo AJ, Stephenson TJ, Milford-Ward A. Does cryptic gluten sensitivity play a part in neurological illness? Lancet. 1996 Feb 10;347(8998):369-71.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/14/2018 - Refractory celiac disease type II (RCDII) is a rare complication of celiac disease that has high death rates. To diagnose RCDII, doctors identify a clonal population of phenotypically aberrant intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs). 
    However, researchers really don’t have much data regarding the frequency and significance of clonal T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements (TCR-GRs) in small bowel (SB) biopsies of patients without RCDII. Such data could provide useful comparison information for patients with RCDII, among other things.
    To that end, a research team recently set out to try to get some information about the frequency and importance of clonal T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements (TCR-GRs) in small bowel (SB) biopsies of patients without RCDII. The research team included Shafinaz Hussein, Tatyana Gindin, Stephen M Lagana, Carolina Arguelles-Grande, Suneeta Krishnareddy, Bachir Alobeid, Suzanne K Lewis, Mahesh M Mansukhani, Peter H R Green, and Govind Bhagat.
    They are variously affiliated with the Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, and the Department of Medicine at the Celiac Disease Center, New York Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center, New York, USA. Their team analyzed results of TCR-GR analyses performed on SB biopsies at our institution over a 3-year period, which were obtained from eight active celiac disease, 172 celiac disease on gluten-free diet, 33 RCDI, and three RCDII patients and 14 patients without celiac disease. 
    Clonal TCR-GRs are not infrequent in cases lacking features of RCDII, while PCPs are frequent in all disease phases. TCR-GR results should be assessed in conjunction with immunophenotypic, histological and clinical findings for appropriate diagnosis and classification of RCD.
    The team divided the TCR-GR patterns into clonal, polyclonal and prominent clonal peaks (PCPs), and correlated these patterns with clinical and pathological features. In all, they detected clonal TCR-GR products in biopsies from 67% of patients with RCDII, 17% of patients with RCDI and 6% of patients with gluten-free diet. They found PCPs in all disease phases, but saw no significant difference in the TCR-GR patterns between the non-RCDII disease categories (p=0.39). 
    They also noted a higher frequency of surface CD3(−) IELs in cases with clonal TCR-GR, but the PCP pattern showed no associations with any clinical or pathological feature. 
    Repeat biopsy showed that the clonal or PCP pattern persisted for up to 2 years with no evidence of RCDII. The study indicates that better understanding of clonal T cell receptor gene rearrangements may help researchers improve refractory celiac diagnosis. 
    Source:
    Journal of Clinical Pathologyhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jclinpath-2018-205023