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    Miss New Jersey International Brings Celiac Disease Awareness to Pageant Stage


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 05/17/2013 - After earning the title of Miss Hoboken International in January, and Miss New Jersey International 2013 on March 9, celiac disease sufferer Jenna Drew will compete with young women from across the globe in the Miss International Pageant in Chicago this July.


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    Photo: CC--hobokenAsked about her opportunity to shine, Drew, 25, who works for Litzky Public Relations in Hoboken, said, “I am so thrilled…You don't get to do something like this every day. It's so exciting.”

    Drew was diagnosed with celiac disease in 2007, after a blood revealed her mother, who was battling cancer, to be suffering from the disease.

    Since 2009, she has been working with the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness and speaking publicly about celiac disease.

    To rise to the top the pageant contest, competitors have to do be fit, glamorous, dance well, have a winning personality, and have strong commitment to community service.

    Drew seeks to raise awareness about celiac disease, especially about the benefits of giving up gluten. Since cutting gluten from her diet in 2009, most of her symptoms have have vanished. She also has more energy, and suffers fewer migraines, she said.

    Drew earned her bachelor's degree in advertising from Penn State University, and her MBA in marketing from the Florida Institute of Technology.

    Drew's latest victory earned her a $500 scholarship to help pay student loans, along with $250 toward an evening gown or cocktail dress for the next pageant.

    Perhaps most important of all, her victory covers the cost of coaching that will help her to sharpen the interview and public speaking skills that are so crucial to success in pageants, and beyond. And it will provide the opportunity to spread the word on celiac disease at engagements across the state.

    “Through this platform in New Jersey, I will be able to make connections and make a difference,” Drew told listeners.

    Drew will next compete in Chicago at the Miss International Pageant on July 22-28. Drew says she looks forward to meeting the other contestants, both from America, and from the around the world.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. He has covered Health News for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. His work has appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate, among others.

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  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/02/2009 - Jesse James, the low-key celebrity biker and husband of star Sondra Bullock, led a gluten-free rally to survive yet another Donald Trump challenge on the Celebrity Apprentice recently.
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    Sources:

    Schwan's Examiner.com Zap2it Popwatch

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 11/09/2012 - From their position in the public eye, celebrities can often draw attention to worthy causes, and to advocate for awareness of those causes more effectively than people outside the media spotlight.
    After being diagnosed with celiac disease in 2008, actress Jennifer Esposito is on a gluten-free diet, and though she's still recovering from the damage to her small intestines, the 'Blue Blood' actress is emerging as a strong advocate for celiac awareness.
    Like so many others with celiac disease, Esposito suffered for many years with symptoms ranging from stomach upset, exhaustion, joint pain, sinus infections, dry skin and hair, panic attacks, depression, and back pain. In fact, nearly twenty years went by before she had a solid diagnosis.
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    Source:
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/sz-berg/jennifer-esposito-celiac_b_1770642.html

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/07/2014 - Our latest gluten-free celebrity news comes with word from eon line.com that actress Jennifer Esposito has sparked a bit of a dustup with Rachael Ray over an episode of Ray's 3 in the Bag that aired earlier this month on Food Network, in which Ray shared some favorite gluten-free recipes.
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/19/2018 - Could baking soda help reduce the inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease? Scientists at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University say that a daily dose of baking soda may in fact help reduce inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease.
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/18/2018 - Celiac disease has been mainly associated with Caucasian populations in Northern Europe, and their descendants in other countries, but new scientific evidence is beginning to challenge that view. Still, the exact global prevalence of celiac disease remains unknown.  To get better data on that issue, a team of researchers recently conducted a comprehensive review and meta-analysis to get a reasonably accurate estimate the global prevalence of celiac disease. 
    The research team included P Singh, A Arora, TA Strand, DA Leffler, C Catassi, PH Green, CP Kelly, V Ahuja, and GK Makharia. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Lady Hardinge Medical College, New Delhi, India; Innlandet Hospital Trust, Lillehammer, Norway; Centre for International Health, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Gastroenterology Research and Development, Takeda Pharmaceuticals Inc, Cambridge, MA; Department of Pediatrics, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy; Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; USA Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; and the Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.
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    Source:
    Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018 Jun;16(6):823-836.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2017.06.037.