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    Mom Helps Novak Djokovic Stick to Gluten-free Diet


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 04/25/2013 - Anyone who has ever struggled with a gluten-free diet can likely identify with tennis star Novak Djokovic. The wold's top tennis player has struggled to faithfully remain 100% gluten-free, and has turned to his mom for a bit of help.

    Photo: CC--Frederic de VillamilStill, the wold's top tennis player has struggled to faithfully remain 100% gluten-free, and admits being tempted by the Balkan foods on which he grew up. 

    In an effort to reap the benefits of a strict gluten-free diet, Djokovic has turned to help from his mom. He says his mother’s home cooking has helped him stick to the dietary plan.

    “I eat mostly at home, my mom cooks special food,” says Djokovic, whose father owned a pizza restaurant, and who grew up in a culture which features plenty of red meat, dumpling and sweet desserts.

    Djokovic has worked to avoid these and other gluten-rich foods over the past few seasons as he has risen to the top of the tennis rankings.

    “It’s hard, because in our country there is a certain kind of mentality towards the food. That is not very encouraging for gluten-free diet.”

    With mom's help, however, Djokovic is finding out just how delicious gluten-free food can be.

    “For me it’s absolutely normal now to have that food, and back home I love mom’s kitchen. That’s the most time spent eating there.”

    For now, join us in saluting Novak Djokovic and his mother in their battle to keep him gluten free, and stay tuned to learn more about Djokovic's efforts to harness his diet to improve his success on the tennis court.

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    Guest Jeanne

    Posted

    I often find that the general public knows very little about gluten-free, or people who need to stay on this diet. In this otherwise fine article, you include a sentence toward the end that sounds like red meat has gluten. Please be careful with your wording, as there's already enough misinformation out there regarding gluten-free food.

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    Guest Ann Mitchell

    Posted

    I support Jeanne's comment - almost everyone I know has no real idea what gluten-free means. Of course there is no gluten in meat. Gluten is in almost all grains - some more, some less. Almost all of my lifelong digestive problems were because of celiac disease, and I did not know it. Back then (I am 77) no one had any idea about celiac disease. Now, at least, some people are catching on to it.

    I wish more doctors would become more open to it. I have only ever had one who was.

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    Guest Ann Mitchell

    Posted

    I often find that the general public knows very little about gluten-free, or people who need to stay on this diet. In this otherwise fine article, you include a sentence toward the end that sounds like red meat has gluten. Please be careful with your wording, as there's already enough misinformation out there regarding gluten-free food.

    Hi Jeanne: I have just made a comment which supports you. Thanks for your clear thinking.

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    Guest Donald Emerant

    Posted

    I agree that this article could mislead and may make people think red meat has gluten. However, it is good to write about famous people who are struggling with celiac disease. This may help others to better understand what the disease is about and how to face it on a daily basis.

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    Guest penelope

    Posted

    Very interesting subject - have only discovered that i am gluten intolerant after many years of terrible stomach problems since i was a little girl. It is all so clear now.

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    I support Jeanne's comment - almost everyone I know has no real idea what gluten-free means. Of course there is no gluten in meat. Gluten is in almost all grains - some more, some less. Almost all of my lifelong digestive problems were because of celiac disease, and I did not know it. Back then (I am 77) no one had any idea about celiac disease. Now, at least, some people are catching on to it.

    I wish more doctors would become more open to it. I have only ever had one who was.

    This is somewhat misleading. There are many, many grains that don't contain gluten: quinoa, buckwheat, amaranth, corn/maize, millet, rice, tapioca, to name a few. I find it pretty easy to stay gluten-free with so much choice

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    Guest Gryphon

    Posted

    This is somewhat misleading. There are many, many grains that don't contain gluten: quinoa, buckwheat, amaranth, corn/maize, millet, rice, tapioca, to name a few. I find it pretty easy to stay gluten-free with so much choice

    Some of those aren't actually grains.

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    Guest Jasmina

    Posted

    I'm also from country (Croatia, EU) where it's normal to eat lots of bread, spaghetti, pizza... it's in our Mediterranean culture... I had strange health episodes: fast heart beat, pain in the bones, allergies... now I'm happy because 3 years I'm on gluten free diet and all my problems are vanished... and I want to share with others because I discovered that in my thirties.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, and science. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com.

    Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book Dangerous Grains by James Braly, MD and Ron Hoggan, MA.

  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
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    So what's fueling such remarkable feats of endurance by a player once derided by fellow pro Andy Roddick as a hypochondriac?
    Djokovic adopted a gluten free diet in July 2010, after nutritionist Igo Cetojevic discovered that the Serb suffered from celiac disease, and thus from poor nutritional absorption and other problems associated with his body's adverse reaction to gluten.
    Since going gluten-free, Djokovic has seen quick and steady results, including a 64-match victory streak and won four grand titles.
    Now, lest we chalk-up his success to a gluten-free diet, it's important to realize that Djokovic spends many hours working on physical development, in addition to lots of heavy drilling on the court. That includes three intense interval sessions in a week, and three heavy lifting sessions in a week. All tolled, it adds up to twenty hours or more of serious training.
    When nutrition, training and skill come together in an athlete as strong and talented as Novak Djokovic, the results are stunning to behold.
    Will Djokovic continue his gluten-free domination of men's tennis? Stay tuned for more news.


    Jefferson Adams
    Novak Djokovic Puts Dog on Gluten-free 'Fitness' Diet
    Celiac.com 10/11/2013 - World No.1 tennis player Novak Djokovic credits a gluten-free diet with strong improvement in his performance and his success on the court.
    Now, word comes that Djokovic has got his pet dog eating gluten-free, as well. In 'Serve To Win', Djokovic's book about his gluten-free diet, he writes of a marked improvement in his health and well-being since he discovered his intolerance to gluten, and began eating gluten-free.
    According to Djokovic, he has even put his dog, Pierre, on a gluten-free diet, and the dog has also become more healthy.
    Dogs can, in fact, react to gluten in pet food. You can read more about that in an earlier article, Gluten and Toxins in Pet Foods: Are they Poisoning Your Pets?
    The article discusses gluten in pet foods, and the questionable role in canine diets.
    So, maybe Djokovic is making a sensible choice and his dog is reaping the benefits of a gluten-free canine diet. What do you think? Is it crazy to put a dog on a gluten-free diet, or could it be good for the dog? Share your comments below.
    Source:
    http://www.aninews.in/newsdetail6/story128099/-039-diet-obsessed-039-djokovic-puts-pet-dog-on-gluten-free-regime-for-fitness-.html

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