Jump to content

Important Information

This site places cookies on your device (Cookie settings). Continued use is acceptance of our Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

  • Sign Up
  • Join our community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

  • Member Statistics

    84,905
    Total Members
    4,125
    Most Online
    Reneé O
    Newest Member
    Reneé O
    Joined
  • 1 1

    No Gluten-Free Diet for Tennis Champion Roger Federer


    Jefferson Adams
    • Twenty-time Grand Slam winner Roger Federer says he’s never tried the gluten-free diet, and that he doesn’t not “even know what that all means…I eat healthy, and I think that's what people should do, too, if they have the options.

    No Gluten-Free Diet for Tennis Champion Roger Federer
    Image Caption: Image: CC--Justin Smith

    Celiac.com 09/18/2018 - With a number of major tennis stars singing the praises of a gluten-free diet, including top players like Novak Djokovic, Swiss great Roger Federer weighed in on the topic.

    The 20-time Grand Slam winner says that he’s never tried the gluten-free diet, and that he doesn’t not “even know what that all means…I eat healthy, and I think that's what people should do, too, if they have the options. It's sure important the right diet for an athlete.”

    Djokovic, the 2018 US Open winner has been gluten-free since 2011, and calls the diet his biggest key to his success.

    For Federer, diet is helpful, but not the whole story. “[Diet] can help you, you know. I mean, I think every athlete should be in good shape. I don't think we should have any fat athletes, to be honest. We do too much sports and we should be too professional to let that happen to ourselves.

    If it happens, well, we should wake up. You don't have the right entourage. They're not telling you that you're a bit fat. Players try different things, and whatever works for them. I do my thing. It's been very easy and natural and healthy, and it's worked.”

    So, while Novak Djokovic, and a number of other athletes, have gone gluten-free and continue to tout the benefits, look for Federer to remain faithful to his generally nutritious non-gluten-free diet.

    Read more at: TennisWorldUSA.org

    1 1


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    There are no comments to display.



    Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

    Guest
    You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, and science. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com.

    Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book Dangerous Grains by James Braly, MD and Ron Hoggan, MA.

  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/29/2011 - Serbian tennis star Novak Djokovic credits an unbeaten string of victories on the court to his special, gluten-free diet.
    Meanwhile, Sabine Lisicki recently attributed her collapse on the threshold of a major upset over third seed Vera Zvonareva in the second round of the French Open to a need for her body to adjust to her new gluten-free diet; which Lisicki adopted after discovering she is intolerant to gluten, a protein in cereal grains.
    After physically crumbling within sight of victory, a sobbing Lisicki was carried from the court on a stretcher. The 21-year-old later explained on her website (www.sabinelisicki.com) that her collapse occurred because her body simply let her down. She said that "[d]octors recently discovered that I am intolerant to gluten -- meaning I can't eat e.g. pasta, one of my biggest energy sources."
    "My body needs to adjust to the big change and needs some time. It is good that we found out and it will only make life better in the long run, she added."
    Pasta and bread are still staple foods for many top athletes, as they are important sources of energy. Athletes on gluten-free diets need to find new energy sources.
    Djokovic has enjoyed a 39-match winning streak after changing his diet in late 2010, after tests by his nutritionist showed him to be gluten intolerant.
    Like Lisicki, Djokovic's body cannot process the carbohydrates he traditionally used to fuel his body, and he was forced to find alternative foods to provide the energy and stamina needed to prevail in long matches. For Djokovic, the change has paid off handsomely.
    "I have lost some weight but it's only helped me because my movement is much sharper now and I feel great physically," said an energized Djokovic, who has beaten Rafael Nadal in four finals this year.


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/02/2012 - Riding high on a gluten-free diet and new training regimen, Novak Djokovic survived eleven grueling hours of tennis over three days to emerge as the 2012 Australian Open men's champion.
    Less than two days after an impressive five set victory over Andy Murray, Djokovic was back on court at Melbourne Park for a six-hour battle against Rafael Nadal.
    So what's fueling such remarkable feats of endurance by a player once derided by fellow pro Andy Roddick as a hypochondriac?
    Djokovic adopted a gluten free diet in July 2010, after nutritionist Igo Cetojevic discovered that the Serb suffered from celiac disease, and thus from poor nutritional absorption and other problems associated with his body's adverse reaction to gluten.
    Since going gluten-free, Djokovic has seen quick and steady results, including a 64-match victory streak and won four grand titles.
    Now, lest we chalk-up his success to a gluten-free diet, it's important to realize that Djokovic spends many hours working on physical development, in addition to lots of heavy drilling on the court. That includes three intense interval sessions in a week, and three heavy lifting sessions in a week. All tolled, it adds up to twenty hours or more of serious training.
    When nutrition, training and skill come together in an athlete as strong and talented as Novak Djokovic, the results are stunning to behold.
    Will Djokovic continue his gluten-free domination of men's tennis? Stay tuned for more news.


    Jefferson Adams
    Does Science Back Powerful Claims by Gluten-free Athletes?
    Celiac.com 11/25/2013 - More and more professional athletes are claiming to reap benefits from adopting a gluten-free diet. What’s the science behind these claims?
    Writing for the Washington Post, Anna Medaris Miller has a very solid article in which she investigates the science behind the claims by many professional athletes that they has reaped tremendous physical benefits by adopting a gluten-free diet.
    Miller cites the growing popularity of gluten-free foods in general, as well as the move away from carbs by many professional athletes. She notes that New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees, the Garmin cycling team and top tennis players Andy Roddick and Novak Djokovic have all been vocal about the benefits of gluten-free diets.
    Still, a gluten-free diet won’t turn you into an Olympic athlete, Fasano says. “But when you go to the high-level performing athletes in which a fraction of a second can mean the difference between winning and losing an event, or be[ing] able to complete a marathon or not within a certain time frame, that can be the small edge that helps you.”
    Some researchers theorize that eliminating gluten allows the body to better carry oxygen to the muscles, which may boost athletic performance.
    There are other theories as to why some athletes report improved athletic performance after eliminating gluten.
    So far, performance claims attributed to a gluten-free diet are purely anecdotal.
    In fact, Miller offers her own experience:
    My digestion is gentler, my sleep is sounder, my energy level is more even. These benefits also seem to have led to improved athletic performance. Since going off gluten, I placed in a race for the first time in my adult life, won a small community biathlon and achieved a personal best in a 5K run. Most important, I felt good while doing it.
    However, there is just no research that documents clear before-and-after changes among athletes who have adopted a gluten-free diet.
    Felicia Stoler, a nutritionist and exercise physiologist, who is president of the Greater New York chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine, says she has yet to see evidence heralding a gluten-free diet for endurance athletes. Until such evidence emerges, says Stoler, many people wise to remain skeptical.
    “If you have nothing wrong with you as far as absorptive disorders, then there’s no benefit by cutting out gluten,” she says. “You have to look at your overall caloric intake needs as an athlete.”
    Source:
    Article from The Washington Post by Anna Medaris Miller, an associate editor of Monitor on Psychology magazine and a health columnist at TheDailyMuse.com.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 09/29/2015 - In his new autobiography, world number one tennis player Novak Djokovic opens up about how positive blood screens for gluten antibodies changed his diet, and how his diet changed his career.
    Through 2010, Djokovic had seen some notable late-match collapses, and was even forced to drop out from competitions due to health reasons. Many thought his career in peril.
    He was referred to doctor Igor Cetojevic, M.D, who recommended several tests, including an ELISA test. ELISA is a common test for malaria and HIV, but it can also be used in the determination of food allergies. Djokovic’s ELISA indicated an intolerance to wheat and dairy products.
    The doctor immediately advised Djokovic to change his diet, especially to eliminate high-gluten foods like bread.
    The scientific evidence is pretty strong that a gluten-free diet is only useful for athletic performance if the athlete is gluten-free, and here is a case where it seems to have made the difference.
    After adopting a fairly strict gluten-free diet, especially during training and match play, Djokovic has seen remarkable success on the court. He has played strong, injury-free tennis and has won multiple grand slam titles with nearly zero defeats, and no late-match bonking of days past.
    Read more at Healthaim.com.

  • Popular Contributors

×