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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/24/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What is Celiac Disease and the Gluten-Free Diet? What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    NOVAK DJOKOVIC: GLUTEN-FREE GLORY AT U.S. OPEN


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 09/22/2011 - Serbian Tennis star Novak Djokovic has gone on a major victory streak since going gluten-free late last year, winning 62 matches, including the Wimbledon championship, and losing just two in 2011.


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    Most recently, Djokovic earned his first-ever U.S. Open tennis championship with a grueling  6-2, 6-4, 6-7 (3), 6-1 victory over Rafael Nadal that took 4 hours and 10 minutes to complete.

    Djokovic playing at this year's U.S. Open. Photo: CC-angela n.Djokovic, who had been hovering near the top of the men's world tennis rankings for several years, credits his most recent break through to a gluten-free diet. Djokovic adopted the gluten-free diet after testing by his nutritionist showed him to be gluten intolerant.

    Because Djokovic cannot process the carbohydrates that were his most common fuel source, and he was forced to find alternative foods to provide the energy and stamina needed to prevail in long matches.

    With just two losses this year coming to Roger Federer in the Semifinals of the French Open, and to Andy Murray in the finals in Cincinnati, Djokovic is having the best year of his career. He credits this change to his gluten-free diet.

    "I have lost some weight but it's only helped me because my movement is much sharper now and I feel great physically," said an energized Djokovic, who has now beaten Rafael Nadal in five finals this year.

    This shows that, while it is possible for people with gluten intolerance to excel in life, even while not getting proper nutrition, getting diagnosed and adopting a gluten-free diet can have clear and obvious benefits, and can, in some cases be the crucial difference in success.

    The gluten-free community should keep their eyes on Novak Djokovic to see how a focused gluten-free diet can make a major difference for people who are gluten intolerant.


    Image Caption: Djokovic playing at this year's U.S. Open. Photo: CC-angela n.
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  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/21/2011 - May is National Celiac Disease Awareness month, as designated by the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness (NFCA), a 501©(3) non-profit organization dedicated to raising awareness and funding for celiac disease. That means a month of official and unofficial events to promote awareness of celiac disease.
    A few of the official events scheduled for National Celiac Disease Awareness month include:
    1) Gluten-Free Food Labeling Summit
    The first annual Gluten-Free Food Labeling Summit will gather legislators, celiac disease researchers, gluten-free community leaders and food corporations as they call upon the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to enforce a standard for safe and effective labeling of gluten-free food.
    When: Wednesday, May 4, 2011
    Time: VIP Reception for sponsors, 5-8:30 p.m.
    Where: Embassy Suites Convention Center
    900 10th Street Northwest
    Washington, DC 20001
    2) #GFchat on Twitter (featuring Ask the Dietitian experts): May 10, 17, 24, 31 - Chats will take place on Tuesday evenings at 8 p.m. ET/5 p.m. PT. Those interested in participating should follow and use the hashtag #GFchat to keep the conversation in one central steam.
    3) LIVE with Jill's List: Should You Be Gluten-Free?
    May 11 - Join LIVE with Jill's List to listen to and CHAT LIVE with celiac and gluten-free experts:
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    * Alice Bast - Founder and President of the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness
    * Jill Brack - Founder of GLOW Gluten Free Cookies
    4) Celiac 60+: Meeting the Needs of the Mature Celiac
    This free online webinar will feature Veronica Alicea, M.B.A., R.D., a well-known dietetic consultant in the celiac and gluten-free fields, leading an hour-long discussion on the rising number of celiac diagnoses in the mature adult population. Wednesday, May 18th at 1 pm ET/10 am PT.
    5) Catwalk for Celiac
    All proceeds will be donated to the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness.
    When: Thursday, May 19, 2011
    Time: 6-10:30 p.m.
    Where: Fiesta Banquet Hall
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    Wood-Ridge, NJ 07075
    Cost: $35 for students, $42 for adults
    6) Celiac Awareness Night at the Mets
    Join the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness and R.O.C.K. Long Island for Celiac Awareness Night at the Mets. The New York Mets will be taking on the Philadelphia Phillies, and catch all the action from special sections in the Left Field Landing - tickets  $35 or $20 each. Gluten-free concessions will be available.
    When: Friday, May 27, 2011
    Time: 7:10 p.m.
    Where: Citi Field
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    Corporate promotions for Celiac Disease Awareness Month include:
    7) Rudi's Unbelievably Good Gluten-Free Recipe Contest
    Submit your original gluten-free recipe using Rudi's Gluten-Free Bakery products (including their new buns and pizza crust) for the chance to win a trip to Colorado and star in an Alternative Appetites video with Dan Kohler!
    Some Important Contest Dates:
    April 18 – May 20:  Recipe submissions accepted on the recipe contest tab on the Rudi’s Gluten-Free Bakery Facebook page
    April 18 – June 6:  Online voting open to the public
    June 13:  Top 3 finalists announced
    June 24:  Top 3 finalists compete in Final Recipe Cook-Off at Restaurant 4580 in Boulder, Colorado.
    Check your local gluten-free or celiac disease support group for details on events in your area. Or get together with friends and family and create your own fun for Celiac Awareness Month!


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 11/04/2011 - For many folks, fall means changing leaves, crisp weather, football, and beer. Or just crisp weather and beer. Fortunately, for those with gluten sensitivities, the explosion of diagnoses for celiac disease and gluten-intolerance has given rise to an explosion of gluten-free products, including a number of gluten-free beers.
    "People are becoming more knowledgeable of the symptoms in which gluten can cause on one's health," said New Planet Beer Marketing Director Danielle Quatrochi, "so people are being diagnosed sooner and more often than before. There's also been a lot of press around the benefits of a gluten-free diet, opening the door for companies to add gluten-free options to their product mix."
    Gluten-free beers have often lacked depth compared to their wheat and barley-infused cousins, and sorghum, a key grain in many gluten-free beer recipes, imparts a distinctly tart flavor. Some gluten-free brewers try to offset the tartness of the millets by using various malts. Others use corn, rice and sugars in place of sorghum.
    Writer Harold Swaney, together with is wife, Erin, and good friend, Kit Hansen, recently set out to do some taste assessments of gluten-free beers. He gathered all the gluten-free beers from all the breweries he could find. In total, they tasted twelve beers by seven brewers.
    The trio tasted Toleration Ale, Redbridge Gluten Free Sorghum Beer, New Planet's Off the Grid Pale Ale, 3R Raspberry Ale, and Tread Lightly Ale, St Peter's Sorghum Beer, Bard's Sorghum Malt Beer, New Grist Beer, and Green's Gluten Free Dubbel Dark Ale, Tripel Blonde Ale, and Amber Ale.
    First up was Redbridge, by Anheuser-Busch. Redbridge is a gluten-free version of a basic American-style lager, made from sorghum, hops, gluten-free yeast. Swaney writes that Redbridge "a clean beer with solid body and nice, subtle finish; the lack of a real sorghum bitter finish." The trio gave Redbridge a thumbs up.
    Next came New Grist, Lakewood Brewery's offering of sorghum, hops, rice and gluten-free yeast grown on molasses. All three tasters were unimpressed. Swaney wrote that New Grist has a "very light body and is eminently forgettable," with one taster comparing it to a "very light, carbonated sake."
    After New Grist came Bards Sorghum Malt Beer, which is brewed from sorghum, yeast and hops.
    Swaney writes that Bards is "strong up front, with notes of caramel and fruit. But, unlike most gluten-free beers that have a distinctly bitter finish, Bards has really no finish. Overall with a solid malt backbone and a nice body." He calls Bards a "respectable gluten-free beer."
    Next came three beers brewed by Green's. All three use millet, buckwheat, rice, sorghum, hops and yeast.
    Of Green's Dubbel Dark Ale, Swaney writes that it has "a slight sorghum finish, but it is sweet up front and passes nicely for a Belgian-style dubbel." Of the Tripel Blonde Ale has notes "fruit up front and…the characteristic mouthfeel of a true tripel."  Swaney reserves his highest accolades for Green's Amber Ale, a medium-bodied ale with "notes of caramel," very little sorghum finish, that he calls "the most balanced of the three."
    The group next sampled Toleration from Nick Stafford's Hambleton Ales in England, which is crafted from Challenger, Liberty and Cascade hops, top-fermenting yeast and specially prepared sugars. Swaney wrote that Toleration "didn't taste much like beer. More like a slightly hoppy barleywine. It had an aroma of dates and figs and was very sweet, but it had almost no carbonation."  His wife, Erin, "compared it to a port."
    Next up was New Planet's Off the Grid Pale Ale, 3R Raspberry Ale, and Tread Lightly Ale. All three are made with sorghum, hops and yeast. The Pale Ale adds brown rice extract and molasses, 3R Raspberry Ale adds corn extract, natural Oregon raspberry puree, and orange peel, while Tread Lightly Ale adds corn extract, and orange peel.
    Among the New Planet offerings, Swaney had the highest regard for Off the Grid Pale Ale. He commended its "malty backbone and hoppy finish." saying that it was "hard to tell it was a gluten-free beer." Swaney says his friend, Kit, who had not tasted a real beer for four years, was "blown away by how much it reminded him of a true pale ale."
    Swaney characterizes Tread Lightly Ale as "a very light beer with a distinct sorghum finish," while the 3R Raspberry Ale is a very carbonated, light ale that evokes a raspberry cider.
    St. Peters, which is made with Sorghum, hops, water. Swaney notes that folks who like European lagers will like this beer. "It starts very bitter, with a distinct grassy aroma," he says, noting that St. Peter's is "definitely a beer that paired well with food."
    Read Harold Swaney's full article at Herald.net.


    Gryphon Myers
    Celiac.com 11/07/2012 - When it comes to whether or not mothers with celiac disease should breastfeed their children, there has been a fair amount of conflicting information in circulation. Some studies have found that breastfeeding renders a protective role when combined with a 'windowed' introduction of gluten, but others have shown no such protective effect. Furthermore, some researchers question the longevity of the protection offered. An international project called PREVENTCD seeks to boil down current information from a number of studies, in order to produce a primary prevention strategy for infants at risk of developing celiac disease.
    The PREVENTCD project aims to answer the following questions:
    Breastfeeding (BF) and celiac disease (Does any BF reduce the risk of developing celiac disease in early childhood? Is there a difference between any or exclusive BF in regard to risk reduction? Is the duration of BF related to the risk of developing celiac disease?). BF at the time of gluten introduction and celiac disease (Is gluten consumption while being breastfed important for risk reduction?). Timing of gluten introduction (Is age of gluten introduction important to the risk of developing celiac disease?). Amount of gluten at weaning (and later) and celiac disease (Is the amount of gluten ingested an independent risk factor for the development of celiac disease in early childhood? Is there a threshold level of gluten consumption for developing celiac disease in early childhood?). Does the administration of microbial supplements (probiotics) and/or substrates (prebiotics) has an effect on the risk of celiac disease? For this report, a collection of studies (preference given to randomized controlled trials) involving infants at risk of developing celiac disease and breastfeeding practices were examined independently by a number of researchers. Inclusion criteria were applied independently and quality of each study's data was examined using the Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing bias risk. Meta-analysis was planned, but outcomes and definitions were inconsistent.
    29 studies were initially identified. Of those, 12 studies were included in the analysis. Collating the data from each, the questions were answered as follows:
    Effect of Breastfeeding on Celiac Disease: Some studies show a protective effect of breastfeeding children at risk of developing celiac disease, but some show no effect and no studies show a long-term preventative effect. Thus, the main controversy surrounding breastfeeding celiac children is whether it has a significant long-term effect. This should not be interpreted as evidence that suggests breastfeeding does not render long-term protection, but rather that no studies have adequately addressed the question yet (partially due to methodological challenges). Studies showing protective effect have postulated that the protection offered by breastfeeding is the result of introducing cytokines, as well as IgA antibodies, lactoferrin and other enzymes (as well as small amounts of gluten) that contribute to passive immunity by reducing the number of infections in the gut. Data from the studies also suggests that longer breastfeeding periods have a more pronounced effect on celiac disease risk. However, there was no evidence to suggest that 'pure' breastfed children were at any less risk than those both breastfed and formula fed.
    Effect of Breastfeeding at Time of Gluten Introduction on Celiac Disease: Data from five case-control studies suggests that breastfeeding at the time of gluten introduction is associated with lower risk of celiac disease compared to formula feeding. The quality of the data is questionable, as most feeding patterns were gathered retrospectively. Again, it is also unclear whether the protective effect merely 'postpones' celiac disease. One study also showed no effect of breastfeeding at the time of gluten introduction on celiac disease autoimmunity (effect on biopsy-proven celiac disease is unknown).
    Timing of Gluten Introduction: While the role of age at time of gluten introduction in determining celiac disease risk is unclear, data from observational studies suggests that early and late introduction of celiac disease may increase risk of celiac disease. Early is defined as before 3 months, while late is defined as later than 7 months. One randomized controlled trial showed that gluten introduction after 12 months might be beneficial, but sample size and unclear risk of bias make this finding inconclusive.
    Effect of Amount of Gluten at Weaning (and Later) on Celiac Disease: One study documented that introducing gluten in large amounts versus small or medium amounts increased celiac disease risk. This echoes old data collected during Sweden's 1980s celiac disease epidemic, but it is unclear whether this is a dose-response effect or a threshold effect. However, a recent study proposes a quantitative model for a HLA-DQ2 gene dose effect in the development of celiac disease.
    Administratioin of Probiotics and/or Prebiotics: There have been no studies examining the effect of probiotics and prebiotics on celiac disease risk in infants, but it is reasonable to assume that manipulating gut microbiotia in early stages of life could affect celiac disease risk. Future studies should investigate this possibility.
    In conclusion, there are still a lot of holes in the data, but what we know thus far tells us that:
    Breastfeeding seems to offer some form of protective effect (whether long or short term) on celiac disease risk in infants. Longer breastfeeding periods seem to offer more protection, but some formula feeding doesn't appear to affect celiac disease risk. Gluten should be introduced in small quantities between 4 and 7 months. Gluten should only be introduced while/if the infant is breastfeeding. The committee on Nutrition of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) believes that this strategy map will not only decrease rates of celiac disease, but type 1 diabetes, mellitus and wheat allergy as well.
    Most of these recommendations have been in place for a while and there is a lot of room for more data, but in the meantime, this is probably the safest strategy for feeding infants who are at risk of developing celiac disease.
    Source:
    http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/771287?src=mp

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/21/2014 - Doctors in India made a bit of a splash recently by using music to help raise awareness about celiac disease, which is rarely-discussed, and under-diagnosed in that country.
    The group, representing numerous areas of medical specialization, met to raise awareness about the disease, especially among their medical peers. Nearly 10 million (1 per cent of India's population) suffer from celiac disease, and very few cases are properly diagnosed.
    Organized by The Celiac Society of Delhi at India Habitat Centre, the event featured doctors speaking about celiac disease and the importance of making a correct diagnosis. To make sure their message got across, they included a musical performance.
    The diagnosis and management of celiac disease in India is, at present, poor, says Celiac Society founder and president Ishi Khosla, adding that "…cases are often mistaken for irritable bowel syndrome, Crohn's disease, tuberculosis or a form of auto-immune disorder."
    People with undiagnosed celiac disease have a much higher risk of getting life-threatening maladies later on in life.
    In addition to featuring music and talks, the conference also played host to guest of honor C.K. Mishra, additional secretary to the Union Ministry of Health and Family Welfare.
    Source:
    Express News Service: New Delhi, Sun Dec 15 2013

  • Recent Articles

    Tammy Rhodes
    Celiac.com 04/24/2018 - Did you know in 2017 alone, the United States had OVER TENS OF THOUSANDS of people evacuate their homes due to natural disasters such as fires, floods, hurricanes, tornadoes and tsunamis? Most evacuation sites are not equipped to feed your family the safe gluten free foods that are required to stay healthy.  Are you prepared in case of an emergency? Do you have your Gluten Free Emergency Food Bag ready to grab and go?  
    I have already lived through two natural disasters. Neither of which I ever want to experience again, but they taught me a very valuable lesson, which is why I created a Gluten Free Emergency Food Bag (see link below). Here’s my story. If you’ve ever lived in or visited the Los Angeles area, you’re probably familiar with the Santa Ana winds and how bitter sweet they are. Sweet for cleaning the air and leaving the skies a brilliant crystal blue, and bitter for the power outages and potential brush fires that might ensue.  It was one of those bitter nights where the Santa Ana winds were howling, and we had subsequently lost our power. We had to drive over an hour just to find a restaurant so we could eat dinner. I remember vividly seeing the glow of a brush fire on the upper hillside of the San Gabriel Mountains, a good distance from our neighborhood. I really didn’t think much of it, given that it seemed so far from where we lived, and I was hungry! After we ate, we headed back home to a very dark house and called it a night. 
    That’s where the story takes a dangerous turn….about 3:15am. I awoke to the TV blaring loudly, along with the lights shining brightly. Our power was back on! I proceeded to walk throughout the house turning everything off at exactly the same time our neighbor, who was told to evacuate our street, saw me through our window, assuming I knew that our hillside was ablaze with flames. Flames that were shooting 50 feet into the air. I went back to bed and fell fast asleep. The fire department was assured we had left because our house was dark and quiet again. Two hours had passed.  I suddenly awoke to screams coming from a family member yelling, “fire, fire, fire”! Flames were shooting straight up into the sky, just blocks from our house. We lived on a private drive with only one way in and one way out.  The entrance to our street was full of smoke and the fire fighters were doing their best to save our neighbors homes. We literally had enough time to grab our dogs, pile into the car, and speed to safety. As we were coming down our street, fire trucks passed us with sirens blaring, and I wondered if I would ever see my house and our possessions ever again. Where do we go? Who do we turn to? Are shelters a safe option? 
    When our daughter was almost three years old, we left the West Coast and relocated to Northern Illinois. A place where severe weather is a common occurrence. Since the age of two, I noticed that my daughter appeared gaunt, had an incredibly distended belly, along with gas, stomach pain, low weight, slow growth, unusual looking stool, and a dislike for pizza, hotdog buns, crackers, Toast, etc. The phone call from our doctor overwhelmed me.  She was diagnosed with Celiac Disease. I broke down into tears sobbing. What am I going to feed my child? Gluten is everywhere.
    After being scoped at Children's Hospital of Chicago, and my daughters Celiac Disease officially confirmed, I worried about her getting all the nutrients her under nourished body so desperately needed. I already knew she had a peanut allergy from blood tests, but just assumed she would be safe with other nuts. I was so horribly wrong. After feeding her a small bite of a pistachio, which she immediately spit out, nuts would become her enemy. Her anaphylactic reaction came within minutes of taking a bite of that pistachio. She was complaining of horrible stomach cramps when the vomiting set in. She then went limp and starting welting. We called 911.
    Now we never leave home without our Epipens and our gluten free food supplies. We analyze every food label. We are hyper vigilant about cross contamination. We are constantly looking for welts and praying for no stomach pain. We are always prepared and on guard. It's just what we do now. Anything to protect our child, our love...like so many other parents out there have to do every moment of ever day!  
    Then, my second brush with a natural disaster happened, without any notice, leaving us once again scrambling to find a safe place to shelter. It was a warm and muggy summer morning, and my husband was away on a business trip leaving my young daughter and me to enjoy our summer day. Our Severe Weather Alert Radio was going off, again, as I continued getting our daughter ready for gymnastics.  Having gotten used to the (what seemed to be daily) “Severe Thunderstorm warning,” I didn’t pay much attention to it. I continued downstairs with my daughter and our dog, when I caught a glimpse out the window of an incredibly black looking cloud. By the time I got downstairs, I saw the cover to our grill literally shoot straight up into the air. Because we didn’t have a fenced in yard, I quickly ran outside and chased the cover, when subsequently, I saw my neighbor’s lawn furniture blow pass me. I quickly realized I made a big mistake going outside. As I ran back inside, I heard debris hitting the front of our home.  Our dog was the first one to the basement door! As we sat huddled in the dark corner of our basement, I was once again thinking where are we going to go if our house is destroyed. I was not prepared, and I should have been. I should have learned my lesson the first time. Once the storm passed, we quickly realized we were without power and most of our trees were destroyed. We were lucky that our house had minimal damage, but that wasn’t true for most of the area surrounding us.  We were without power for five days. We lost most of our food - our gluten free food.
    That is when I knew we had to be prepared. No more winging it. We couldn’t take a chance like that ever again. We were “lucky” one too many times. We were very fortunate that we did not lose our home to the Los Angeles wildfire, and only had minimal damage from the severe storm which hit our home in Illinois.
      
    In 2017 alone, FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency) had 137 natural disasters declared within the United States. According to FEMA, around 50% of the United States population isn’t prepared for a natural disaster. These disasters can happen anywhere, anytime and some without notice. It’s hard enough being a parent, let alone being a parent of a gluten free family member. Now, add a natural disaster on top of that. Are you prepared?
    You can find my Gluten Free Emergency Food Bags and other useful products at www.allergynavigator.com.  

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/23/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to learn whether celiac disease patients commonly suffer cognitive impairment at the time they are diagnosed, and to compare their cognitive performance with non-celiac subjects with similar chronic symptoms and to a group of healthy control subjects.
    The research team included G Longarini, P Richly, MP Temprano, AF Costa, H Vázquez, ML Moreno, S Niveloni, P López, E Smecuol, R Mazure, A González, E Mauriño, and JC Bai. They are variously associated with the Small Bowel Section, Department of Medicine, Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo Gastroenterology Hospital; Neurocience Cognitive and Traslational Institute (INECO), Favaloro Fundation, CONICET, Buenos Aires; the Brain Health Center (CESAL), Quilmes, Argentina; the Research Council, MSAL, CABA; and with the Research Institute, School of Medicine, Universidad del Salvador.
    The team enrolled fifty adults with symptoms and indications of celiac disease in a prospective cohort without regard to the final diagnosis.  At baseline, all individuals underwent cognitive functional and psychological evaluation. The team then compared celiac disease patients with subjects without celiac disease, and with healthy controls matched by sex, age, and education.
    Celiac disease patients had similar cognitive performance and anxiety, but no significant differences in depression scores compared with disease controls.
    A total of thirty-three subjects were diagnosed with celiac disease. Compared with the 26 healthy control subjects, the 17 celiac disease subjects, and the 17 disease control subjects, who mostly had irritable bowel syndrome, showed impaired cognitive performance (P=0.02 and P=0.04, respectively), functional impairment (P<0.01), and higher depression (P<0.01). 
    From their data, the team noted that any abnormal cognitive functions they saw in adults with newly diagnosed celiac disease did not seem not to be a result of the disease itself. 
    Their results indicate that cognitive dysfunction in celiac patients could be related to long-term symptoms from chronic disease, in general.
    Source:
    J Clin Gastroenterol. 2018 Mar 1. doi: 10.1097/MCG.0000000000001018.

    Connie Sarros
    Celiac.com 04/21/2018 - Dear Friends and Readers,
    I have been writing articles for Scott Adams since the 2002 Summer Issue of the Scott-Free Press. The Scott-Free Press evolved into the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. I felt honored when Scott asked me ten years ago to contribute to his quarterly journal and it's been a privilege to write articles for his publication ever since.
    Due to personal health reasons and restrictions, I find that I need to retire. My husband and I can no longer travel the country speaking at conferences and to support groups (which we dearly loved to do) nor can I commit to writing more books, articles, or menus. Consequently, I will no longer be contributing articles to the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. 
    My following books will still be available at Amazon.com:
    Gluten-free Cooking for Dummies Student's Vegetarian Cookbook for Dummies Wheat-free Gluten-free Dessert Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Reduced Calorie Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Cookbook for Kids and Busy Adults (revised version) My first book was published in 1996. My journey since then has been incredible. I have met so many in the celiac community and I feel blessed to be able to call you friends. Many of you have told me that I helped to change your life – let me assure you that your kind words, your phone calls, your thoughtful notes, and your feedback throughout the years have had a vital impact on my life, too. Thank you for all of your support through these years.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/20/2018 - A digital media company and a label data company are teaming up to help major manufacturers target, reach and convert their desired shoppers based on dietary needs, such as gluten-free diet. The deal could bring synergy in emerging markets such as the gluten-free and allergen-free markets, which represent major growth sectors in the global food industry. 
    Under the deal, personalized digital media company Catalina will be joining forces with Label Insight. Catalina uses consumer purchases data to target shoppers on a personal base, while Label Insight works with major companies like Kellogg, Betty Crocker, and Pepsi to provide insight on food label data to government, retailers, manufacturers and app developers.
    "Brands with very specific product benefits, gluten-free for example, require precise targeting to efficiently reach and convert their desired shoppers,” says Todd Morris, President of Catalina's Go-to-Market organization, adding that “Catalina offers the only purchase-based targeting solution with this capability.” 
    Label Insight’s clients include food and beverage giants such as Unilever, Ben & Jerry's, Lipton and Hellman’s. Label Insight technology has helped the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) build the sector’s very first scientifically accurate database of food ingredients, health attributes and claims.
    Morris says the joint partnership will allow Catalina to “enhance our dataset and further increase our ability to target shoppers who are currently buying - or have shown intent to buy - in these emerging categories,” including gluten-free, allergen-free, and other free-from foods.
    The deal will likely make for easier, more precise targeting of goods to consumers, and thus provide benefits for manufacturers and retailers looking to better serve their retail food customers, especially in specialty areas like gluten-free and allergen-free foods.
    Source:
    fdfworld.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/19/2018 - Previous genome and linkage studies indicate the existence of a new disease triggering mechanism that involves amino acid metabolism and nutrient sensing signaling pathways. In an effort to determine if amino acids might play a role in the development of celiac disease, a team of researchers recently set out to investigate if plasma amino acid levels differed among children with celiac disease compared with a control group.
     
    The research team included Åsa Torinsson Naluai, Ladan Saadat Vafa, Audur H. Gudjonsdottir, Henrik Arnell, Lars Browaldh, and Daniel Agardh. They are variously affiliated with the Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Karolinska University Hospital and Division of Pediatrics, CLINTEC, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institute, Sodersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Diabetes & Celiac Disease Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; and with the Nathan S Kline Institute in the U.S.A.
    First, the team used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS) to analyze amino acid levels in fasting plasma samples from 141 children with celiac disease and 129 non-celiac disease controls. They then crafted a general linear model using age and experimental effects as covariates to compare amino acid levels between children with celiac disease and non-celiac control subjects.
    Compared with the control group, seven out of twenty-three children with celiac disease showed elevated levels of the the following amino acids: tryptophan; taurine; glutamic acid; proline; ornithine; alanine; and methionine.
    The significance of the individual amino acids do not survive multiple correction, however, multivariate analyses of the amino acid profile showed significantly altered amino acid levels in children with celiac disease overall and after correction for age, sex and experimental effects.
    This study shows that amino acids can influence inflammation and may play a role in the development of celiac disease.
    Source:
    PLoS One. 2018; 13(3): e0193764. doi: & 10.1371/journal.pone.0193764