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    Old Press Coverage of Celiac Disease


    Scott Adams


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      ABCs 20/20 - August 6, 1999 (Friday night). One of the presentations was "A Good Doctor,"  which covered celiac disease.

    • July 29, 1999 - The London Times: A UK research team at Guys & St Thomas in London have won German Institute of Technology international competition (DM12 million) for research projects "based on genetic structure of grains of cereal and designed to develop variants of wheat, rye and barley that are non toxic to people with coeliac disease."
    • July 28, 1999 - There was a stor about celiac disease on the NYC WNBC TV evening news.

    • U.S. News & World Report - July 26, 1999 issue had an article titled, "The curse of Frankenfood," which discussed food allergies and celiac disease.

    • 7/21/99 - Channel 7 in Chicago (an ABC affiliate) aired a 2 ½ minute segment on celiac disease and the magazine Sullys Living Without during the 10pm news.

    • Awake! Magazine, March 22, 1999 - Coping with Celiac Disease.
    • The Diabetic Advisor, March/April 1998, p. 18-19, "The Mysterious Celiac Sprue," by the American Diabetic Association.
    • Psychology Today, April 1998, p. 20, "Q&A" section on gluten intolerance.
    • Vegetarian Times, February 1998, p. 36-37, "Cant Eat Wheat?" by Mary Carroll.
    • Allure Magazine, February 1998, p. 80, "Gluten for Punishment."
    • Belfast News Letter, January 31, 1998, "Diet Disorder Difficult to Diagnose."
    • San Jose Mercury News, January 24, 1998, "The Communion Ailment," by Judith Neuman Beck.
    • Calgary Herald, January 2, 1998, "Cancer Theory Sparks Controversy," by Daryl Slade. An interview with Ron Hoggan.
    • Newsweek, 11/17/97, p. 95. The article is about Leaky Gut/ intestinal permeability. It also mentions a possible link to chronic-fatigue syndrome.
    • Toronto Star, 06/23/97, "Hormone Holds Hope for Repairing Intestine," by Leslie Papp.
    • Ithaca Journal, 04/12/97, "Sweets for the Statesmen, subtitle Desserts, White House Style," by Lawrence L. Knutson. "With (President) Clinton, Mesnier [His desert chef] faces a special challenge...hes on a special diet because he has allergies - no dairy products, no chocolate, no wheat."
    • Independent newspaper (UK), 2/8/96, LONDON: This is a short article reporting research into ME (myalgic encephalomyelitis) by doctors at the Royal Hallamshire Hospital in Sheffield. Their research was published in the same weeks Lancet. Their study found that Gluten may play role in nerve disease.
    • Boston Globe, 10/19/95, p.3, title: "Jet Lag Tale Works Some of the Time". This is a 600 word article including a small notice of the recent findings about oats.
    • Reuters; Philippe Naughton; 10/18/95: "Oats are fine for people with celiac disease."
    • Star Ledger, 8/28/95, "Gluten-Free Diet Works Wonders for Person with Celiac Sprue." Another of Dr. Donohues columns. This on is a short commentary on the varying length of time is takes to heal after beginning gluten-free diet.
    • The Oregonian (newspaper), July 25, 1995, "When Food Bites Back," by Barbard Durbin.
    • Baltimore Sun, 7/11/95, p. 1D, title: "A Healthy and Happy Girl Suddenly Became Sick..." This is a long article (1900 words) about one familys experience with their daughters diagnosis, and how they have coped with it.
    • Gannett News Service; Hollie Weaver Beason; 5/2/95: "Nutrition: Food Allergies"
    • Virginian-Pilot and Ledger-Star (Norfolk, VA), 4/6/95, p.F1, title: "When Food is the Enemy; Sensitivity to Certain Foods ..." Long article (2700 words) on food allergies, food sensitivities; including two paragraphs on celiac disease.
    • Jerusalem Post; Judy Siegel-Itzkovich; 4/02/95: "No free lunch for children who need special diet."
    • Jerusalem Post; Itim; 2/19/95: "Products containing gluten to be marked"
    • Gannett News Service; Mindy Mozer;10/18/94: "Celiac Disease Hard to Diagnose."
    • Star Ledger (Newark, NJ), 5/6/94, title: "Sprue Patients Grain Intolerance Requires a Lifelong Restricted Diet." Dr. Dononues write-in column is a short piece about the lifelong nature of the celiac diet.
    • Telegram & Gazette (Worcester, MA), 3/28/94, p. C1, title: "Its All Relative; Skeletons in Family Medical History Can Affect Your Health." Thoughts on the family tree & how to track genetic inclinations.
    • Harvard Health Letter; Goldfinger, S.E.; 2/1/92: "A cereal mystery"
    • Harvard Health Letter; Hoffmann, S.; 5/1/91: "Gluten for punishment."
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  • About Me

    In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease. In 1998 I founded The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore!, and I am the co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

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    Scott Adams
    This statement is being distributed by Sapporo Breweries:
    "A representative from Sapporo Breweries, Ltd./Tokyo has advised that Sapporo beer does contain barley. However, after the barley is boiled, the gluten is filtered out along with the barley skins. The representative assured me that although the barley itself does contain gluten, their brewing process effectively removes all the gluten from their beer."
    The following comments were written by Donald D. Kasarda who is a research chemist in the Crop Improvement and Utilization Research Unit of the United States Department of Agriculture. If you have any questions or comments regarding the piece, you can address them to Don at: kasarda@pw.usda.gov.
    The reason that this doesnt make sense for celiac patients has to do with the digestion of the barley hordeins, the proteins that are similar to wheat gliadins in barley. During the malting and fermentation processes, the barley hordeins are broken down into smaller pieces called peptides. It is true that no intact hordein proteins can generally be found in beer. However, the smaller pieces of these proteins resulting from enzymatic digestion are often quite water soluble so that they remain in the beer throughout the complete processing to the final product. (Remember that beer is not a distilled product as are whiskey or vodka. Filtration of the beer will not remove these small water-soluble hordein polypeptides.) A barley hordein might have a polypeptide chain including 300 amino acids in its sequence, yet it is reasonably well established by experiments that polypeptides with as few as 13 amino acid residues in the chain can still retain toxicity for celiac patients. These small pieces of the original proteins can (and do) have very different properties from the original larger proteins. In the strict sense, Sapporo is correct that there are no more intact hordeins in their beer. What they cannot claim is that there are no hordein peptides in the beer that might harm celiac patients.
    There is some evidence from analytical methods involving antibodies prepared to gliadins that there are peptides in beer that react with these antibodies. It is not proved beyond any doubt that the peptides in beer are actually toxic to celiac patients, but it is quite possible that the peptides remaining in any barley-based or wheat-based beer, Sapporo included, are harmful to celiac patients. The amount of harmful peptides, if they are present, is likely to be small, but there is no satisfactory analytical data, in my opinion, that defines the amount exactly. So it could be in a range that would be harmful to a celiac patient drinking beer on a regular basis. My guess is, and I emphasize that I cant back this up with scientific results, that a glass of beer once every few months would not do lasting harm to the average celiac patient. By average celiac patient, I mean those who have no obvious allergic character to their disease and do not notice any immediate reaction when they ingest gluten. 

    Scott Adams
    Dr. Kelly, who is a refractory sprue specialist, had interesting insights into Celiac Disease. He first described once having a patient say to him that eating at a restaurant or food take out is the gastronomic equivalent of promiscuous and unprotected sex because (you) dont know where food has been, who else its been with, and what you might get from it. Dr. Kelly explained that his job when seeing a patient with possible Refractory Sprue is to first confirm that the patient really has Celiac Disease and is adhering to a gluten-free (gluten-free) diet. He explained that some patients would rather prefer an iron shot than adhere to a gluten-free diet and that sensitivities vary which removes another drive to say gluten-free; however, if symptomatic, he has found that the patient has the motivation to adhere. Hes even had to recruit and train dieticians to take an interest in Celiac Disease. He said that Celiac Disease or Gluten Sensitive Enteropathy is driven by activated lamina propria T-cells to whom gliadin is being presented through their T-cell receptors. In Refractory Sprue, he said that the cells are evident at intraepithelial lymphocytes rather than lamina propria lymphocytes and they no longer require gluten in order to be driven. So, theyre on auto-pilot. He emphasized that this is a rare disease and advised that doctors get a competent dietician to help patient adhere to diet.
    If the concern is that the patient is adhering but is not responding, Dr. Kelly advised doctors to think of other disorders masquerading as Celiac Disease, especially if patient is IgA, EmA (anti-endomysial) negative or if not HLA DQ2 or DQ8 (common Celiac genes) positive. He added that not every flat mucosa consistent with Celiac Sprue is Gluten Sensitive Enteropathy but that there can be a differential diagnosis such as cow protein intolerance. He said that there are unusual immunologic disorders that can be mistaken for sprue or refractory sprue. He said that doctors should consider these if the patient was not IgA endomysial or human tTg (transglutaminase) antibody positive at diagnosis. He explained that the positive predictive value of those tests are so strong that really its in some ways has a higher positive predictive value than even biopsy that you dont get very, very if any false positives at least by the immunofluorescence assay. So, if theyre negative at diagnosis considering other possibilities and this is one instance where HLA typing actually may be clinically useful if you have a patient you think has Celiac Sprue but isnt behaving or responding as you would expect with a gluten free diet and you ask do they really have Sprue. If they are HLA DQ2/DQ8 negative, then the likelihood of them having gluten sensitive disease is much, much lower. He said that serology (blood tests) were helpful but not be relied upon. He said that IG antibody levels against gliadin, or tissue transglutaminase tend to drop fairly quickly usually within 2 to 3 months provided they (patient) were positive to begin with. ...The IgG takes much longer so it tends to be less useful and of course, if they are IgA deficient, they wont be IgA positive to begin with and you cant use then. Even if their antibody levels are high to begin with, and remain high, that to me means that theyre still exposed to the antigen and they still have T-cells. Their lamina propia T-cells are still being driven by the antigen. But if theyre negative, Im afraid that its not particularly sensitive and low levels of gluten exposure may result in symptoms and poor response would not necessarily be identifiable by antibody.... Dr. Kelly said that patients with subtle manifestations of Celiac Sprue who have been previously diagnosed with irritable bowel or host of other disorders are now being more frequently seen. He said that there has been a lot of discussion in the past year about Celiac Sprue being misdiagnosed as Irritable Bowel Syndrome.
    Dr. Kelly also described the circumstance that patients with Celiac Sprue show improvement both serologically (blood) and histologically (biopsy) but their symptoms persist. He said that doctors need to be aware that just because a patient has gluten sensitive enteropathy doesnt mean they cant get another gastrointestinal disorder. He gave examples such as microscopic colitis and what he called a classical association, hyperthyroidism, or something else which could also cause diarrhea and weight loss.
    Dr. MacDonald, a celiac specialist, discussed new insights into the pathogenesis of Celiac Disease. Dr. MacDonald discussed primarily the role that other factors besides the DQ2 (gene) molecule, control the T-cells in the gut mucosa which produce the lesion or flat mucosa. In the genesis of the lesion, he explained how the T-cell immune response in the gut wall results in a gut shape of tall villi and short crypts which results in an increase in mucosa volume with flat mucosa and an increase in mucosa thickness. My husband, a PhD immunologist, interpreted this for me; He said that imagine the villi are the hill and the crypts are the valley. The valley is where things grow. The oldest cells are at the tip of the hill and as cells mature, they get transported up the hill. As damage occurs, the hill gets chopped down, valleys get deeper making more area for cells to replicate. Dr. MacDonald assumed that because the epithelium is turning over so fast in Celiac Disease that the lamina propria, the shape of the gut itself would be turning over, but actually the data says otherwise. The flat mucosa isnt turning over at all, ... a rather stable shape, its not really dynamic, its remodeled. He said that putting Celiacs on a gluten free diet may take them a long time to get better, because it takes a long time for this to go back because this is actually stable, its remodeled....
    Dr. MacDonald explained that gliadin peptides associate with DQ2 and DQ8 molecules putting themselves into the grooves to be seen by T cells. However, he gave an instance where a particular gliadin peptide doesnt fit well into the pockets of DQ2 to be seen by T cells. Tissue Transglutaminase or Ttg deamidates (removes chemical groups on certain amino acids and allows peptide to bind to DQ2) this peptide in terms of glutamine into glutamic acid, gives a negative charge, fits very well into pocket, and binding increases 100 fold. Tightness of the binding ... controls the specificity and strength of the T-cell response.
    Dr. MacDonald also described the case of a woman with cancer who was treated with interferon. He said that she had the endomysial antibodies, was DQ2 positive, and had Celiac Disease; however, he cited that the reason why the Celiac Disease was not found earlier was that interferon alpha/gamma used to treat the cancer may have precipitated clinical Celiac Disease. He added that her son was later diagnosed with Celiac Disease as well. It was also eluded to that a viral infection like a gastrointestinal flu would stimulate or produce interferon alpha.
    Dr. Alessio Fasano from the Center for Celiac Research at the Univ. of Maryland also explained that its not just the gluten antigen and genes (i.e., HLA DQ2 or DQ8) but an added element like that alluded to by Dr. MacDonald such as a viral infection which can result in Celiac Disease. Dr. Fasano described a study performed on North African children who were thought to have symptoms resembling infectious disease with symptoms like anemia and diarrhea were found to have Celiac Disease at the rate of 1 in 18. He said because they have a high consumption of grains and seem to carry a high frequency of the genetic elements, he felt that non-profit organizations may intervene to help institute a gluten-free diet in this Celiac population. Dr. Fasano mentioned a study performed in Southern California which found Celiac Disease in 2 to 4% of people with symptoms or associated diseases and 5% in family members of Celiacs. Dr. Fasano stated that the overall prevalence is 1 in 266 which he said on a global scale, by far this is the most frequently genetic disease of human kind. Fasano said that in the 1970s, it was thought Celiac Disease was confined to the pediatric population but that since 1998 there has been a surge in adult versus child cases. He believes that the disease may have been overlooked in adults because adults have more atypical symptoms like anemia, osteoporosis, abortion that would NOT see a Gastroenterologist but would see an internist, reproductive OBGyn, endocrinologist, etc.
    Dr. Fasano said that if the iceberg idea is diarrhea, weight loss, abdominal symptoms, you will surely crash into the iceberg, but he proposed, what about the people who have joint pain, constipation, fatigue, and so on. He said that if you are willing to see the monument of the problems, you have to get down under the water because in the vast majority of cases, Celiacs will not see a Gastroenterologist and that doctors must be aware of those under the water. Dr. Fasano during the question and answer session listened to a doctor in the audience describe a patient with diarrhea and schizophrenia whose diarrhea and schizophrenia resolved when put on a gluten-free diet. The doctor didnt know what to do with the patient but explained that the patients background, being of Irish descent, gave him a red flag into the possibility of Celiac Disease. Dr. Fasano in response described how there can be a change in behavior such as attention deficit disorder, depression, and schizophrenia. He described a theory that the epitopes of gluten could cross the intestinal barrier, cut into the bloodstream, and cross the blood brain barrier. He believes that there is a clear association between Celiac Disease and change in behavior.
     

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/14/2013 - Gluten-free tennis sensation Novak Djokovic's recent five set victory over Andy Murray at Melbourne Park makes him the first man in the 45-year Open era to win three consecutive Australian Opens.
    Since going gluten-free in 2010, after tests indicated that he suffered from gluten-intolerance, the 25-year-old Djokovic is undefeated at the Australian Open, and virtually unstoppable on the court.
    Following a high-protein, gluten-free diet, Djokovic now avoids most starches, including his past favorites, pizza and pasta. The Serbian tennis star credits the gluten-free diet with sharp improvements to his tennis and his health.
    “Mentally, you’ll be fresh, you’ll be happier, you’ll be calmer," said Djokovic. Physically, you’ll be stronger, faster, more dynamic, your muscles will work better. That’s what I feel."
    At first, the already slim 6-foot-2 Djokovic lost 10 pounds after cutting gluten out of his diet, but insists it has only helped his game.
    "I have lost some weight but it's only helped me, because my movement is much sharper now and I feel great physically," said Novak, whose weight now hovers at 176 pounds. “I am very skinny. [but] I am fast and very powerful on the court, so this is what matters.”
    When he's not in training, Djokovic has been known to backslide and eat some of his old favorites, including pizza and pasta, a pattern familiar to many folks seeking to follow a gluten-free diet, especially those who don't suffer immediate symptoms.
    However, he says that following a gluten-free diet brings out his best.
    "If you can mentally overcome this greed and eat only the food that is good for your metabolism, then you will have the best results, not just in tennis but in life as well," he says.
    Djokovic has now won a total of four Australian Open trophies: In 2008, and then 2011, 2012 and 2013.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/05/2013 - Meanwhile, on the Canadian gluten-free front, a local lawmaker has introduced a bill to have testing for celiac disease covered by the Ontario Health Insurance Plan.
    Bill Mauro (Lib., Thunder Bay-Atikokan) introduced a private member’s bill Tuesday afternoon in Queen’s Park asking for an amendment to the Health Insurance Act to include serological testing for celiac disease.
    Mauro cited statistics indicating that about one per cent of Canadians are currently affected by celiac disease, but that 90 per cent of them are undiagnosed.
    The longer those people remain undiagnosed, the more severe the potential health impact. The long-term impacts of celiac disease can include vitamin deficiencies and higher rates of type 1 diabetes, arthritis, depression, neuropathy, infertility and osteoporosis, among other factors.
    Celiac disease can be detected with a simple blood test and controlled by diet. With early detection, people with celiac disease can live "a long and healthy life,” Mauro said.
    Source:
    tbnewswatch

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/25/2018 - The latest studies show that celiac disease now affects 1.2% of the population. That’s millions, even tens of millions of people with celiac disease worldwide. The vast majority of these people remain undiagnosed. Many of these people have no clear symptoms. Moreover, even when they do have symptoms, very often those symptoms are atypical, vague, and hard to pin on celiac disease.
    Here are three ways that you can help your healthcare professionals spot celiac disease, and help to keep celiacs gluten-free: 
    1) Your regular doctor can help spot celiac disease, even if the symptoms are vague and atypical.
    Does your doctor know that anemia is one of the most common features of celiac disease? How about neuropathy, another common feature in celiac disease? Do they know that most people diagnosed with celiac disease these days have either no symptoms, or present atypical symptoms that can make diagnosis that much harder? Do they know that a simple blood test or two can provide strong evidence for celiac disease?
    People who are newly diagnosed with celiac disease are often deficient in calcium, fiber, folate, iron, magnesium, niacin, riboflavin, vitamin B12, vitamin D, and zinc. Deficiencies in copper and vitamin B6 are less common, but still possible. Also, celiac disease is a strong suspect in many patients with unexplained nutritional anemia. Being aware of these vague, confusing symptoms of celiac disease can help people get bette advice, and hopefully speed up a diagnosis.
    2) Your dentist can help spot celiac disease
    Does your dentist realize that dental enamel defects could point to celiac disease? Studies show that dental enamel defects can be a strong indicator of adult celiac disease, even in the absence of physical symptoms. By pointing out dental enamel defects that indicate celiac disease, dentists can play an important role in diagnosing celiac disease.
    3) Your pharmacist can help keep you gluten-free
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    Pharmacists can also help with information on the ingredients used to manufacture various vitamins and supplements that might contain wheat.
    Understanding the many vague, confusing symptoms of celiac disease, and the ways in which various types of health professionals can help, is a powerful tool for helping to diagnose celiac disease, and for managing it in the future. If you are suffering from one or more of these symptoms, and suspect celiac disease, be sure to gather as much information as you can, and to check in with your health professionals as quickly as possible.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/23/2018 - If you’re looking for a great gluten-free Mexican-style favorite that is sure to be a big hit at dinner or at your next potluck, try these green chili enchiladas with roasted cauliflower. The recipe calls for chicken, but they are just as delicious when made vegetarian using just the roasted cauliflower. Either way, these enchiladas will disappear fast. Roasted cauliflower gives these green chili chicken enchiladas a deep, smokey flavor that diners are sure to love.
    Ingredients:
    2 cans gluten-free green chili enchilada sauce (I use Hatch brand) 1 small head cauliflower, roasted and chopped 6 ounces chicken meat, browned ½ cup cotija cheese, crumbled ½ cup queso fresco, diced 1 medium onion, diced ⅓ cup green onions, minced ¼ cup radishes, sliced 1 tablespoon cooking oil 1 cup chopped cabbage, for serving ½ cup sliced cherry or grape tomatoes, for serving ¼ cup cilantro, chopped 1 dozen fresh corn tortillas  ⅔ cup oil, for softening tortillas 1 large avocado, cut into small chunks Note: For a tasty vegetarian version, just omit the chicken, double the roasted cauliflower, and prepare according to directions.
    Directions:
    Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a cast iron or ovenproof pan until hot.
    Add chicken and brown lightly on both sides. 
    Remove chicken to paper towels to cool.
     
    Cut cauliflower into small pieces and place in the oiled pan.
    Roast in oven at 350F until browned on both sides.
    Remove from the oven when tender. 
    Allow roasted cauliflower to cool.
    Chop cauliflower, or break into small pieces and set aside.
    Chop cooled chicken and set aside.
    Heat 1 inch of cooking oil in a small frying pan.
    When oil is hot, use a spatula to submerge a tortilla in the oil and leave only long enough to soften, about 10 seconds or so. 
    Remove soft tortilla to a paper towel and repeat with remaining tortillas.
    Pour enough enchilada sauce to coat the bottom of a large casserole pan.
    Dunk a tortilla into the sauce and cover both sides. Add more sauce as needed.
    Fill each tortilla with bits of chicken, cauliflower, onion, and queso fresco, and roll into shape.
    When pan is full of rolled enchiladas, top with remaining sauce.
    Cook at 350F until sauce bubbles.
    Remove and top with fresh cotija cheese and scallions.
    Serve with rice, beans, and cabbage, and garnish with avocado, cilantro, and sliced grape tomatoes.

     

    Roxanne Bracknell
    Celiac.com 06/22/2018 - The rise of food allergies means that many people are avoiding gluten in recent times. In fact, the number of Americans who have stopped eating gluten has tripled in eight years between 2009 and 2017.
    Whatever your rationale for avoiding gluten, whether its celiac disease, a sensitivity to the protein, or any other reason, it can be really hard to find suitable places to eat out. When you’re on holiday in a new and unknown environment, this can be near impossible. As awareness of celiac disease grows around the world, however, more and more cities are opening their doors to gluten-free lifestyles, none more so than the 10 locations on the list below.
    Perhaps unsurprisingly, the U.S is a hotbed of gluten-free options, with four cities making the top 10, as well as the Hawaiian island of Maui. Chicago, in particular, is a real haven of gluten-free fare, with 240 coeliac-safe eateries throughout this huge city. The super hip city of Portland also ranks highly on this list, with the capital of counterculture rich in gluten-free cuisine, with San Francisco and Denver also included. Outside of the states, several prominent European capitals also rank very highly on the list, including Prague, the picturesque and historic capital of the Czech Republic, which boasts the best-reviewed restaurants on this list.
    The Irish capital of Dublin, meanwhile, has the most gluten-free establishments, with a huge 330 to choose from, while Amsterdam and Barcelona also feature prominently thanks to their variety of top-notch gluten-free fodder.
    Finally, a special mention must go to Auckland, the sole representative of Australasia in this list, with the largest city in New Zealand rounding out the top 10 thanks to its 180 coeliacsafe eateries.
    The full top ten gluten-free cities are shown in the graphic below:
     

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/21/2018 - Would you buy a house advertised as ‘gluten-free’? Yes, there really is such a house for sale. 
    It seems a Phoenix realtor Mike D’Elena is hoping that his trendy claim will catch the eye of a buyer hungry to avoid gluten, or, at least one with a sense of humor. D’Elena said he crafted the ads as a way to “be funny and to draw attention.” The idea, D’Elena said, is to “make it memorable.” 
    Though D’Elena’s marketing seeks to capitalizes on the gluten-free trend, he knows Celiac disease is a serious health issue for some people. “[W]e’re not here to offend anybody….this is just something we're just trying to do to draw attention and do what's best for our clients," he said. 
    Still, the signs seem to be working. D'elena had fielded six offers within a few days of listing the west Phoenix home.
    "Buying can sometimes be the most stressful thing you do in your entire life so why not have some fun with it," he said. 
    What do you think? Clever? Funny?
    Read more at Arizonafamily.com.

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    Premium ingredients, bakeshop delicious recipes, and happy customers were our inspiration from the beginning— and are still the cornerstones of Bakery On Main today. We are a fiercely ethical company that believes in integrity and feels that happiness and wholesome, great tasting food should be harmonious. We strive for that in everything we bake in our dedicated gluten-free facility that is GFCO Certified and SQF Level 3 Certified. We use only natural, NON-GMO Project Verified ingredients and all of our products are certified Kosher Parve, dairy and casein free, and we have recently introduced certified Organic items as well! 
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