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    Jefferson Adams

    Say Hello to Ireland's First Gluten-free Stout

    Caption: Ireland brews its first ever gluten-free stout. Photo: CC--IntangibleArts

    Celiac.com 04/07/2017 - If watching all those pints of Guinness being downed on St. Patrick's Day left you wishing that someone, somewhere in Ireland, would brew a tasty gluten-free stout, your wish has come true.

    The people at the 9 White Deer brewery have heard your whispered wishes and responded with Stag Saor. Ireland's first gluten-free stout, a beer that puts a fresh twist on the Emerald Isle's long stout-brewing tradition.

    Now, a gluten-free stout was not always part of the plan. Less than a year after found the 9 White Deer microbrewery, co-founder, Don O'Leary was diagnosed with a gluten intolerance. Rather than view this development as a setback, however, O'Leary and his partners used it as fuel to drive their business.

    Working with his partner, the former marine engineer, Gordon Lucey , O'Leary set about creating the company's first gluten-free brew. O'Leary says that developing Stag Saor "changed everything for the business." Their market research taught them that, while Ireland has a fairly high percentage of people with celiac disease, it has a relatively paltry number of gluten-free beers.

    Saor launched in 2015 and received a bronze medal at the 2016 Blás na hEireann awards, winning against traditional beers in a blind taste test.

    Offered a preview sip of the new stout, writer Kevin Kennedy, calls the beer "top quality... as good as if not better, than any bottled stout I've had in the past."

    The 9 White Deer brewery draws its name from a 6th Century fable, in which angels told the famous Irish Saint, Gobnait, that she would establish an Abbey and a church on a site where she found 9 White Deer. The sight is just down the road from the brewery, which now employs eight people, in Ballyvourney, Co. Cork.

    Source: Newstalk.com


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    Is this a stout made of traditional ingredients and then de-glutenified? Or is it a stout made of non-traditional ingredients?

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, science, and advanced research, and scientific methods. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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    Im the same, I never know what to eat, some food does better than others for me, I went on to make my own soup and Im glad I did, I should do it more often and at least then J know what's going in to it, it wasn't the best first try but I enjoyed it haha
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    Not to mention the fact that (for those using the Nima) the Nima sensor has been known to give false positives. https://www.theverge.com/2019/4/1/18080666/nima-sensor-testing-fda-food-allergy-gluten-peanut-transparency-data https://www.celiac.ca/cca-statement-nima-gluten-sensor/ https://www.allergy-insight.com/nima-is-it-really-96-9-accurate/ https://www.glutenfreewatchdog.org/news/troubling-gluten-testing-data-released-by-nima-but-hold-the-phone/ https://www.glutenfreew
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