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    Summary of the Digestive Diseases Intragency Coordinating Committee (Part of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases- NIDDK) March 10, 1998 Meeting


    Scott Adams


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    The following report was prepared by Ann Whalen, celiac, and editor/publisher of Gluten-Free Living , which is a bimonthly newsletter for celiacs - Gluten-Free Living, PO Box 105, Hastings-on-Hudson, NY 10706.

    On March 10th, more than 20 members of the celiac community and celiac disease specialists (see list at end) attended a meeting of the Digestive Diseases Intra-agency Coordinating Committee, a part of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK).

    The meeting, held to update the current status of Celiac Disease, was chaired by Jay Hoofnagle, M.D., Director of the Division of Digestive Diseases and Nutrition at the NIDDK. At the meeting, presentations were made by Martin Kagnoff, M.D., Joseph Murray, M.D., Alessio Fasano, M.D., and Frank Hamilton, M.D.

    Dr. Kagnoff is a gastroenterologist and Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Diego. He spoke about his research into the genetics of Celiac Disease, focusing on the pathogenesis. Dr. Kagnoff is well known for his research into the genetics of Celiac Disease, and several of his studies have been funded by the NIH.

    Dr. Murray, Associate Professor of Medicine and clinician at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, described his experience with Celiac Disease both in Iowa and in Ireland, noting that his interest in celiac disease is clinical. He emphasized what he called the Classic II symptoms, meaning the actual symptoms patients have today and not the Classic symptoms many doctors may be familiar with. He said the rate of diagnosis is proportional to suspicion.

    Dr. Murray described the celiac disease experience at the University of Iowa from 1985 to 1997, presenting statistics that indicated a steep increase in diagnosis. At our institution, Celiac Disease is an adult disease, he said, and is now seen as frequently as Crohns Disease.

    Anticipating the question, Why look for Celiac Disease?, Dr. Murray gave his reasons: preventing lymphoma and osteoporosis, as well as resolving fatigue and nonspecific symptoms and shortening the current significant delays in diagnosis.

    Dr. Fasanos presentation was called Where Have All the American Celiacs Gone? He described what has happened in the field of celiac disease in various parts of the world, including some parts of the United States, but emphasized the European experience. Dr. Fasano noted that plans are already underway in Italy to screen all seven-year-olds in 1999.

    Dr. Fasano explained why an epidemiology study is critically needed in this country. He pointed out the benefits of such a study for four groups:

    • The American health care community: lower health care costs, increased awareness of celiac disease and more knowledge of its protein manifestations in the US
    • Participating physicians: publications, more patients and increased credibility.
    • The American people: the prevalence will be established and
    • celiac disease will be diagnosed more quickly.
    • Celiac Patients: free screening of first-degree relatives, federal support for dietary and drug regulations, an improved food supply, stronger local support groups and more funding for celiac research.

    Dr. Fasano added that such a study, whatever its findings, would end in a win-win situation for everyone. If the study shows that celiac disease is underestimated in this country, patients will benefit as physicians begin looking for the problem with the knowledge that they might well find it. If the study shows celiac disease is indeed rare in the United States, its even more exciting because we will be able to figure out why.

    Dr. Hamilton, chief of the Digestive Diseases Program Branch at the NIDDK, briefly described the celiac disease research, to date, that has already been funded by the NIH. He said $1.4 million has been granted for such research, adding that over the last five years, we have seen growth in the funding of Celiac Disease. He said he was pleased funding has increased, and felt a lot of work has to be done.

    Dr. Hamilton ended by saying, Todays meeting will serve as an impetus for a partnership between the National Institutes of Health, academe, and the lay groups to foster more research. He added that it was important for the investigators and support group representatives present at the meeting to get the word out, referring to information about Celiac Disease.

    These talks were followed by a round table discussion, between the members of the committee and the presenters. Later, audience comment was invited. The committee showed an interest in the current adult nature of the disease, the changing symptoms, current testing methods, and identification of the most critical research needs. Patients who spoke were anxious to let the committee know what they felt were the important concerns in the real world.

    At the end of the meeting, Dr. Hoofnagle said his division will prepare a short, pithy plan, then present it to Drs. Kagnoff, Murray and Fasano. He noted that the important issues are pathogenesis, delivering the message to physicians, clinical research issues and pediatric health concern.

    Some Quotes from the Meeting

    Elaine Monarch: There is a general lack of knowledge, awareness and interest in Celiac Disease among the medical profession. We celiacs can go for years with substantial symptoms but not diagnosis...The cost to the medical community is enormous.

    Joseph Murray, M.D.: There is more than one gene involved in Celiac Disease. Most Europeans are homogenous. Here we have a mongrelized population. What happens when you mix? How much does it change? Our mongrelized population may be at risk at a later age.

    Martin Kagnoff, M.D.: The issue of other genes is not at all clear. Like Joe (Dr. Murray), I see adult celiacs. Their time delay to diagnosis is not exaggerated, but what is striking is the lack of knowledge of doctors, even at the University of California. They really are not aware of this disease.

    Alessio Fasano, M.D.: We receive 10-15 calls a day. The vast majority are self diagnosed. They say, I know more than my gastroenterologist.

    Peter Green, M.D.: We need to emphasize education of gastroenterologists. At my institution (Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center in New York City), doctors are not used to looking at the duodenum...We need to educate many levels of the medical community and tell them, If you dont recognize something, take a biopsy.

    Sue Goldstein: Im concerned about the people who have not yet been diagnosed and the reasons why a physician wont consider Celiac Disease. It all boils down to, its rare and you cant have it.

    In addition to the speakers, the following were among those who attended:

    • Phyllis Brogden, celiac, founder and chairperson of the Greater Philadelphia Celiac Sprue Support Group.
    • Winnie Feldman, celiac, Celiac Disease Foundation
    • Kenneth Fine, M.D., gastroenterologist/ researcher at Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas.
    • Al Fornace, M.D., celiac, National Cancer Institute
    • Sue Goldstein, celiac, founder and advisor, Westchester Celiac Sprue Support Group
    • Peter Green, M.D., clinician/researcher at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center in New York City.
    • Joanne Hameister, celiac, former chairperson, Western New York Gluten-Free Support Group
    • Ivor Hill, M.D., clinician/researcher at Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina.
    • Beth Hillson, celiac and proprietor of the Gluten-Free Pantry.
    • Karoly Horvath, M.D., clinician/researcher at the University of
    • Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore.
    • Marge Johanamen, celiac, CSA Kentucky state coordinator
    • Pam King, University of Maryland
    • Bob Levy, Celiac Research Foundation
    • Ruth Levy, spouse
    • Jax Lowell, celiac and author of Against the Grain
    • Elaine Monarch, celiac, founder and Executive Director of the Celiac Disease Foundation
    • Selwyn J. Monarch, Board of Directors, CDF
    • Diane Paley, celiac, governing board CSA/USA
    • Michelle Pietzak, M.D., pediatric gastroenterologist at Childrens Hospital, Los Angeles
    • Connie Tur, celiac, president Greater Louisville Celiac Sprue Support Group
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    Four physicians can't seem to figure out what my problem is, two emergency room visits later and I am still experiencing severe problems with constipation . Now finally perhaps I have found some answers, thank you

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