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    Tears of Celiac Joy as Paris Bakeries Slowly Embrace Gluten-Free

    Jefferson Adams
    • Tears of joy roll down the faces of many celiac customers who travel to Chambelland bakery in Paris, where everything they make is naturally gluten-free.

    Tears of Celiac Joy as Paris Bakeries Slowly Embrace Gluten-Free
    Caption: Image: CC--Yuichi Shiraishi

    Celiac.com 07/11/2018 - For people with celiac disease, finding decent gluten-free bread is like searching gold. Many have given up on bread entirely and others begrudgingly relate themselves to the ignominious frozen aisle at their supermarket and content themselves with one of the many dry, shriveled, flavorless loaves that proudly tout the gluten-free label. 

    For these people, the idea of freshly baked bread is a distant, if comforting, memory. The idea of going to Paris and marching into a boulangerie and walking out with a warm, tasty, gluten-free baguette that was freshly baked on the premises that morning, is like a dream. Now, in some Parisian bakeries, that dream is becoming a reality. And the tear of joy from the thankful gluten-free masses are sure to follow.

    These days, a single sign on the awning speaks to hungry customers who peruse the tarts and chou buns, and the loaves that fill the cooling on racks behind a glass pane at Chambelland boulangerie and café in Paris’ 11th arrondissement. The sign lettered in French translates: “artisan baker; flour producer; naturally gluten free.” That’s right. Naturally gluten-free. At a bakery. In Paris. 

    Only the flat, focaccia-style loaves, and the absence of baguettes, tells customers that this bakery is something different. Chambelland opened its doors in 2014 and continues to do a brisk business in delicious, freshly baked gluten-free breads and other goods.

    The boulangerie is the work of Narhaniel Doboin and his business partner, Thomas Teffri-Chambelland. They use flour made of grains including rice, buckwheat and sorghum to make delicious gluten-free baked goods. Doboin says that customers queued in the rain on the first day, hardly believing their eyes, some began to cry. 

    For gluten-free Parisians, there was a time before Chambelland, and the time after. If you find yourself in Paris, be sure to search them out for what is sure to be a gluten-free delight.

    Or maybe book your ticket now.

    Read more at: Independent.co.uk

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    Guest Ruthie

    Posted

    Chambelland is great, Paris also has a few other entirely gluten free bakeries. Sitron and Helmut Newcake are two others to check out while you're there!

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    Guest Guest Christine

    Posted

    We just returned from Paris and Noglu was my go-to several times during our vacation. Delicious and safe, since everything in their shop is gluten free. 

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    I was born Toulon, and have relatives in France, and they have been raving about ces boulangeries and begging us to visit again soon. We have plans for the fall, so we are continuing our research. Many thanks for this article and for the wonderful and informative responses!

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    Guest Kristi

    Posted

    I love, love, love Noglu. I discovered it in 2015 and have been back several times since then. It is amazing!

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, and science. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com.

    Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book Dangerous Grains by James Braly, MD and Ron Hoggan, MA.

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