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    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, and science. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com.

    Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book Dangerous Grains by James Braly, MD and Ron Hoggan, MA.

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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 08/30/2013 - World's top-ranked tennis star, Novak Djokovic credits his recent success on the court to his gluten-free diet.
    Fans looking for nutrition tips from the Serbian tennis master can look no further than Djokovic's new book "Serve to Win: The 14-Day Gluten-Free Plan for Physical and Mental Excellence''
    The book, described as a ''nutrition-based performance guide," will be released by Zinc Ink/Random House before the US Open tournament later this summer.
    Since adopting a "performance-focused" gluten-free diet in late 2010, Djokovic has won six of his seven Grand Slam tournament championships. In 2011, he won Wimbledon and the Australian and US Opens. In 2012 and 2013, he won the Australian Open again.
    Djokovic says that his gluten-free fueling has made him lighter, healthier, and more focused. It has, he adds, "made all the difference in my career and in my life."

    Jefferson Adams
    Novak Djokovic Puts Dog on Gluten-free 'Fitness' Diet
    Celiac.com 10/11/2013 - World No.1 tennis player Novak Djokovic credits a gluten-free diet with strong improvement in his performance and his success on the court.
    Now, word comes that Djokovic has got his pet dog eating gluten-free, as well. In 'Serve To Win', Djokovic's book about his gluten-free diet, he writes of a marked improvement in his health and well-being since he discovered his intolerance to gluten, and began eating gluten-free.
    According to Djokovic, he has even put his dog, Pierre, on a gluten-free diet, and the dog has also become more healthy.
    Dogs can, in fact, react to gluten in pet food. You can read more about that in an earlier article, Gluten and Toxins in Pet Foods: Are they Poisoning Your Pets?
    The article discusses gluten in pet foods, and the questionable role in canine diets.
    So, maybe Djokovic is making a sensible choice and his dog is reaping the benefits of a gluten-free canine diet. What do you think? Is it crazy to put a dog on a gluten-free diet, or could it be good for the dog? Share your comments below.
    Source:
    http://www.aninews.in/newsdetail6/story128099/-039-diet-obsessed-039-djokovic-puts-pet-dog-on-gluten-free-regime-for-fitness-.html

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 08/13/2015 - When Novak Djokovic ended Roger Federer's hopes of an eighth Wimbledon title with a powerful 7-6, 6-7, 6-4, 6-3 victory on Centre Court, he celebrated with a little taste of the famous Wimbledon grass.
    Tennis' top ranked Djokovic let out a resounding bellow after claiming his own eighth Grand Slam of his own, before a bit of good-natured turf snacking.
    The 28-year-old joked that he had incorporated Wimbledon grass to his gluten-free training diet because "I was assured that's it's gluten free, it's not processed, completely organic and natural and I could eat it," he said. "So I had no reaction."
    Read more at Express.co.uk.

    Jefferson Adams
    Why All the Hate for Gluten-free Celebrities?
    Celiac.com 09/11/2015 - At Celiac.com, we're generally of the opinion that any publicity about celiac disease and gluten sensitivity is good publicity. We've always believed that the less people know about celiac disease, the more those who have it are at risk.

    Undoubtedly gluten-free celebrities are bringing a huge awareness to celiac disease and the gluten-free diet, and this has lead not only to increased awareness of the disease, but also may have directly contributed to lowering the overall risk for those of us who have it by vastly increasing the number of people who are on the gluten-free diet. This has ultimately led to an explosion in the number, variety and availability of gluten-free products. 
    Interestingly, articles about gluten-free celebrities have prompted some our strongest and most vocal backlash. The main thrust of many of these negative comments seems to be the idea that the seriousness of their own celiac disease will somehow be adulterated by celebrities who "come out" about the gluten-free diet but don't actually have celiac disease. Somehow they believe that this could lead to others not taking the diet seriously enough, or there is the belief by some that these celebrities just want to make a buck off of those who need to be on the diet.
    A partial list of some noteworthy celebrities and athletes who reportedly follow a gluten-free diet due to celiac disease, gluten-intolerance, or other reasons include: news host Keith Olbermann, actor Billy Bob Thornton, Elizabeth Hasselbeck, Katherine, Dutchess of Kent, pro quarterback Drew Brees, news anchor Heidi Collins, Katherine, Dutchess of Kent, news host Keith Olbermann, actor and writer Billie Bob Thornton, author Sarah Vowell, and actresses Zooey Deschanel, Susie Essman, Jennifer Esposito, Goldie Hahn, Gwyneth Paltrow, Emily Rossum, and Rachel Weisz.
    We've mentioned a few of them in articles over the years, and boy have we gotten some spirited responses. Here are a few:
    The above article prompted this comment:
    "I'm very surprised celiac.com would promote this kind of stuff on their site. Celebrities going gluten free does not help our cause. It just diminishes it." We've selected some of our favorites comments for your reading pleasure. Celebrities who've drawn the ire of our readers include Lady Gaga, about whom one reader wrote: 
    "Great. One more celebrity jumping on the gluten-free bandwagon 'to lose weight'. This doesn't help establish credibility for the celiacs who truly need to follow a gluten-free diet." While another wrote:
    "It is very aggravating when there is publicity for a notorious star on a gluten-free diet without good reason. I think it trivializes the serious medical problem of celiac disease. This needs to be recognized as the dangerous condition it is and the diet needs to be followed for life. This is NOT A FAD DIET!" Our article about good old Gwyneth Paltrow caused one reader to write:
    "Paltrow - not my cup of tea. Nose in the air and head - we need better examples of celebrity concern and involvement." One reader took particular exception to the idea that Novak Djokovic occasionally breaks his gluten-free diet:
    "He is a disgrace to the gluten-free diet. Go on Youtube and search Novak Djokovic Interview On Live With Regis & Kelly 09-13-2011 watch from 4.35 where he admits he still eats gluten. Thanks to celebs like him celiac disease is seen as a joke!" Elizabeth Hasselbeck doesn't fare much better, sparking one reader to comment that:
    "Elizabeth Hasselbeck is trying to get attention. Her story is no different than thousand of others." When actress Charlize Theron called BS on gluten-free diet faddists, our readers wrote:
    "Stop giving airtime to people who have obviously not done their research and/ or do not know how to read and interpret scientific studies." And:
    "Charlize has a real potty-mouth, and is not overly bright. Does she think that gluten free means sugar free, since she blasted the cupcake for not having sugar. I don't believe actors are medical experts, just because they are popular. And I sure wouldn't take any advice or change my diet on their say-so." More than a few readers commented on our article entitled Jimmy Kimmel Skewers Clueless Gluten-free Dieters, including one who wrote:
    "Why is gluten intolerance or coeliac disease supposed to be hilariously funny and only something that hypochondriacs obsess about? At least most of these people showed some awareness of what foods contain gluten, I do not see that it matters much if they cannot give a scientific definition." Another reader agrees, noting:
    "this is no 'joke' to those who have the slightest crumb and get very, very ill. Everyone is affected differently, but I wouldn't wish those cramps and the pain on my worst enemy." Practically the only celebrity to come out of a gluten-free celebrity article unscathed was The Daily Show's Jon Stewart.
    We did get overwhelmingly favorable comments about Jon Stewart's handling of the topic of celiac disease, and its effects upon him as a dad.
    Proving perhaps that, if you're a popular celebrity with an accurate, compassionate and serious message about celiac disease, people probably won't hate you.
    Oh, and then there is Chelsea Clinton. If you count Chelsea Clinton as a celebrity, then it's fair to mention that folks had nice things to say about her gluten-free wedding cake.

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