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    The Gluten Free Expo in Canada


    Yvonne (Vonnie) Mostat
    Image Caption: Photo: CC--TownePost Network

    Celiac.com 03/11/2015 - The Gluten Free Expo in Canada is incorporated under gluten-free Events Limited. Since January 2012, and under the guidance of Margaret Dron has held 10 Shows in Canada. It started in a small community centre gymnasium in Vancouver B.C. with just two goals:


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    "To collect gluten-free food donations so gluten intolerance families needing assistance will never have to choose between eating, or feeling ill. Sadly, due to the higher costs of gluten-free food, this is a category that is not often donated and is needed by Food Banks across Canada.;

    To help those living with gluten intolerance to discover new dietary solutions, connect with others in the gluten-free community, and to provide education on living gluten-free the healthy and accessible way.

    Following the first Gluten Free Expo, exhibitors and attendees alike asked us to come back again, so we did and continue to do so yearly. We have also expanded across Canada to connect with more members of the gluten-free community.

    By the way, donations of gluten-free food are being accepted onsite for the Food Bank. To date, your kind donations raised over 10,000 lbs of food, and enough cash donations to buy another 22,000 worth of gluten-free food for Food Banks across Canada. Donations collected at this show will go to your local food bank."

    Photo: CC--TownePost NetworkThousands of people happily paid the online price of $12.00 or the $15.00 cost at the door with children under 10 getting in free when accompanied by an adult. The bronze sponsor of the event in Vancouver was "Enjoy Life Foods"Â and it was presented in part by Udi's Gluten Free and Glutino. Approximately 110 Exhibitors were at the event with samples of their products. (I was so full when my husband and I were finished!) Margaret Dron is very picky about which exhibitors are allowed to display their foods. From what I observed, and the questions I asked, they were made in gluten-free factories, so no other food products were produced there. For the wines and beers she ensured that the 20ppm was complied with. I went home with a free bag full of 3 boxes of Catelli Pasta, Pamela's Cookies, Shortbread, Banana Chips prepared with orange marmalade, crackers of three types; I was already full and I had savings coupons on gluten-free foods from the vendors too. I was disappointed that the new "All But Gluten"Â by Weston Bakeries were not able to make the Western Show. Their gluten-free foods are excellent, particularly the cinnamon raisin bread which I cannot seem to get enough of.

    They even had a separate auditorium for GMO (Genetically Modified Foods) which was very interesting, and a little scary too. Speaker choices were also excellent with good titles.

    "NAVIGATING LOW FODMAP DIETS (Choices Markets registered Dietician) At first I thought that was spelled wrong with the FODMAP, but it was particularly interesting for those with gluten intolerance and continued digestive symptoms. The Elimination Diet was explained at length,. EATING FOR ENERGY with Patrician Chuev, Registered Die titian and published author. As a 6 time published author and living with Celiac Disease herself she knows intimately the challenges of fuelling a busy gluten-free lifestyle and she shared her strategies for achieving a healthy state. Inspiring!

    In the afternoon on Saturday we had Essential Gluten-Free Alternatives and Superfoods with Adam Hart, Nutritional Researcher and best selling author. That was a 30 minute presentation , some of the information from his book "The Power of Food"Â. Must admit Adam did go on about discovering today's top gluten-free alternatives and I was a little negative about that to start with, even for the gluten sensitive.

    Finally UNDERSTANDING CAUSES OF INFLAMMATION IN THE G.I. TRACT WITH Dr. Wangen, N.D. He is Medical Director of the IBS Treatment Centre and award winning author of "Healthier Without Wheat"Â It was too bad that this well-known man was scheduled for 3:00 p.m. because he explored the digestive tract and the causes of inflammation in the GI. Tract and the importance of the ecosystem that is contained there, and how to keep it all happy.

    * I was quite full by that time and you must admit the subject of the gastro--intestinal tract at that time of the day, with a full stomach is not very appetizing.

    Some of the smaller companies were just in the Lower Mainland area, wanting to make an input into the U.S. market but weren't quite there yet. Others, like Udi's and Glutino, Pamela's and Enjoy Life Foods you will know quite well in the U.S.A.

    The NEXT Gluten Free Expo will be in Calgary on May 2 and 3rd, 2015, 19:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Tickets available online for $12.00 [Visa or Mastercard) at the door $15.00 cash only, with children under 10 free. Too bad the Calgary Stampede is July 3rd to the 12th or you could do a cross-border holiday with the Canadian Dollar being so low.

    The U.S.A. Gluten Free and Allergen Friendly Expo

    The U.S.A. Gluten Free and Allergen Friendly Expo (unrelated to the Canadian - http://gfafexpo.com/) is the biggest gluten-free and allergen friendly event in the U.S., "Whether you're looking for specialty products that taste great or trying to learn how to cook and bake to meet your dietary needs the Expo is the place to be!" 

    The 2015 Gluten Free and Allergen Friendly Expo Locations for this year are:

    • April 18, 2015 Atlanta, GA
    • May 2,3 2015 -Chicago IL
    • July 25, 2015 - Worcester MA
    • October 3-4, 2015, Secaucus, NJ 
    • Dallas, TX, - October 17, 18 2015

    States in their literature: "The Gluten Free & Allergen Friendly Expo is dedicated to meeting the needs of the celiac community. Those with gluten and food sensitivities, auto-immune/inflammatory disease and autism. The public is helped through vendor exposition, educational sessions, and online resources. The manufacturers are serviced through vendor expositions, marketing programs and consultative services."Â Sounds good!

    Does not list the cost or hours, but it does say "Get Expo Tickets Now!"Â But it also has educational sessions and indicates "food sensitivities"Â, auto-immune inflammatory disease and autism which makes my ears prick up!

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  • About Me

    I am a freelance journalist. I am a retired registered nurse. I write regularly for the Celiac Journal of Gluten Sensitivity which publishes in the United States and British Columbia. I write under Dr. Ron Hoggan out of Victoria. I write for several secular magazines, and also five or six religious magazines, both Protestant and Catholic. Since retiring as a nurse, journalism, my second major in University, has been a life saver for me, both my poetry and articles. My husband and I recently arrived home from an all inclusive holiday to the Mayan Riviera, The Grand Sirenis Mayan. The Assistant Manager was unaware of celiac disease, but he was very interested in learning about it. I had my "Safe" and "Sorry" list translated into Spanish before we left home and several sheets of information laminated. I was so impressed at how they handled my meals I wanted to write about it. My Gluten Free Canada FREE Magazine.

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    Scott Adams
    Frederik Willem Janssen is head of the Chemistry Department, Food Inspection Service in Zutphen, and a subsidiary of the Inspector of Health Protection (similar to the FDA in America). Their lab has a special interest in.... modified gluten, edible packaging materials (which may contain gluten), and detection of hidden gluten in foods, including the development of improved detection methods. He is also a member of the Medical/Scientific Advisory Committee of the Dutch Celiac Society.
    Distillation quite effectively removes the gluten and it is very unlikely that splashes of fermented (we call it "moutwijn", i.e. malt wine, can’t remember the correct English word for it) will be carried over to the final distillate. If they are present they must have been added afterwards. A couple of years ago we analyzed some distilled liquor for presence of gluten proteins but we couldn’t detect any in this set (about 40 different types). The beer test, which consisted of a set of 50 different brands, showed that most brands (35) did contain immunoreactive protein in amounts between 1 and 200 mg/liter. Only 15 contained less than 1 mg/liter. There was a strong correlation between the gluten content and whether wheat had been used as an ingredient!
    I found a report in a periodical by the Flemish Celiac Society of an investigation that was published in 1992 about immunological determination of gluten in beer and some distilled liquor. This confirmed our findings that the gluten content of beer is quite variable (the authors found levels from zero to 400 mg /liter gluten).
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/25/2013 - Anyone who has ever struggled with a gluten-free diet can likely identify with tennis star Novak Djokovic. The wold's top tennis player has struggled to faithfully remain 100% gluten-free, and has turned to his mom for a bit of help.
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    Source:
    http://www.nj.com/hudson/index.ssf/2013/03/miss_international_hoboken_con.html

    Jefferson Adams
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    Celiac.com 07/20/2018 - During my Vipassana retreat, I wasn’t left with much to eat during breakfast, at least in terms of gluten free options. Even with gluten free bread, the toasters weren’t separated to prevent cross contamination. All of my other options were full of sugar (cereals, fruits), which I try to avoid, especially for breakfast. I had to come up with something that did not have sugar, was tasty, salty, and gave me some form of protein. After about four days of mixing and matching, I was finally able to come up with the strangest concoction, that may not look the prettiest, but sure tastes delicious. Actually, if you squint your eyes just enough, it tastes like buttery popcorn. I now can’t stop eating it as a snack at home, and would like to share it with others who are looking for a yummy nutritious snack. 
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    Jefferson Adams
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    The team found less evidence, and low GRADE certainty, for claims that breastfeeding reduces eczema risk during infancy, that longer exclusive breastfeeding is associated with reduced type 1 diabetes mellitus, and that probiotics reduce risk of infants developing allergies to cow’s milk. 
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    Stay tuned for more on diet during pregnancy and its role in celiac disease.
    Source:
    PLoS Med. 2018 Feb; 15(2): e1002507. doi:  10.1371/journal.pmed.1002507

    Jefferson Adams
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    Source:
    BMC Pediatrics

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/16/2018 - Did weak public oversight leave Arizonans ripe for Theranos’ faulty blood tests scam? Scandal-plagued blood-testing company Theranos deceived Arizona officials and patients by selling unproven, unreliable products that produced faulty medical results, according to a new book by Wall Street Journal reporter, whose in-depth, comprehensive investigation of the company uncovered deceit, abuse, and potential fraud.
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    According to Carreyrou, Theranos’ lies and deceit made Arizonans into guinea pigs in what amounted to a "big, unauthorized medical experiment.” Even though founder Elizabeth Holmes and Theranos duped numerous people, including seemingly savvy investors, Carreyrou points out that there were public facts available to elected officials back then, like a complete lack of clinical data on the company's testing and no approvals from the Food and Drug Administration for any of its tests.
    SEC recently charged the now disgraced Holmes with what it called a 'years-long fraud.’ The company’s value has plummeted, and it is now nearly worthless, and facing dozens, and possibly hundreds of lawsuits from angry investors. Meantime, Theranos will pay Arizona consumers $4.65 million under a consumer-fraud settlement Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich negotiated with the embattled blood-testing company.
    Both investors and Arizona officials, “could have picked up on those things or asked more questions or kicked the tires more," Carreyrou said. Unlike other states, such as New York, Arizona lacks robust laboratory oversight that would likely have prevented Theranos from operating in those places, he added.
    Stay tuned for more new on how the Theranos fraud story plays out.
    Read more at azcentral.com.