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  • Jefferson Adams

    The Good Place Debuts Gluten-Free Food Eateries in Australia

      Open 24 hours a day, every day, the restaurant features breakfast lunch and dinner.

    Caption: Image: CC--Colin Morison Photography

    Celiac.com 05/09/2019 - My Kitchen Rules show finalist, Scott Gooding, is not a household name in the U.S. However, with a bit of luck, his new, Good Place, health-centered free-from eateries are fast becoming a household word in Australia. Everything on the Good Place menu is gluten and soy free, and most items are low in carbs and sugar.

    The restaurant is slated to debut locations in Blacktown and Central Park in Sydney, and Buddina and Surfers Paradise in Queensland. Gooding’s Sydney South restaurant is now open at Westfield Miranda. 

    Open 24 hours a day, every day, the restaurant features breakfast lunch and dinner. Dishes include a Kakadu Smoothie Bowl with coconut cream, MCT oil, Kakadu plum and peanut butter, and the pesto omelette – with chargrilled greens.

    Dinner items include a vegan curry, tender ox cheeks in a sticky sauce, with chargrilled greens, and a 12-hour slow-cooked lamb with roast potatoes and Café de Paris butter.

    For the sweet tooth, The Good Place features semi-freddo made with raspberries, dark chocolate, coconut, macadamia and coconut kefir, and Raspberry Floater, a house-made chocolate ice cream floated in hemp organic kombucha.

    For those of drinking age, they offer numerous "health-conscious" cocktails, and certified organic wines on offer. Good Place also goes the extra mile, and sources all their produce in a sustainable and ethical way, when possible.

    Learn more about The Good Place at thebrag.com


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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, science, and advanced research, and scientific methods. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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    Jefferson Adams
    Amy's Kitchen Opens All Veggie Drive-Thru with Gluten-free Twist
    Celiac.com 07/10/2015 - Ready for a revolution in healthy fast food? Amy's Kitchen thinks so.
    Looking to be more than just a frozen food company, food-maker Amy's Kitchen is staking a bet on healthy fast food by opening a healthy all vegetarian drive-thru restaurant in Rohnert Park, California.
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    Celiac.com 11/28/2016 - The title of my article might seem a little shocking to most of the celiac community. Why wouldn't I want restaurants to offer high quality, safe meals to those who suffer from celiac disease or from non-celiac gluten intolerance so they could also enjoy dining out with their family and friends like everyone else? It's not that I don't want restaurants to offer gluten-free options: I do. But, I want them to be high quality, high integrity, and offered by a properly trained and knowledgeable staff. Otherwise, I truly don't think your establishment should bother offering gluten-free options to your diners and guests.
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    As with any product that comes to market with a claim, restaurant menus are subject to abide by the same guidelines. For instance, if you claim something is "reduced fat", then it better, by all means, be reduced fat from the original version of the same dish. The same principal applies to gluten-free dishes with the standards taking full affect in the summer months of 2014. If your restaurant claims it is gluten-free, then it better be gluten-free, and not just "assumed" gluten-free.
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    Gluten-free diners, just like all diners, place a great deal of faith and trust in people who prepare their meals at restaurants, diners, bakeries and cafes. With this great measure of trust being established at the first encounter with a restaurant guest, it pays to educate everyone from host/hostess to head chef on the proper way to handle gluten-free meals, and for that matter, all FAI's.
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    Jefferson Adams
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    In the absence of federal enforcement at the restaurant level, the burden for making sure food is gluten-free falls to the person doing the ordering. So, gluten-free eaters beware!
    These results are probably not surprising to many of you. Do you have celiac disease? Do you eat in restaurants? Do you avoid restaurants? Do you have special tactics?  Feel free to share your thoughts below.
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    Jefferson Adams
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    Celiac.com 04/05/2019 - Avoiding gluten is literally the most important dietary practice for people with celiac disease. A gluten-free diet is the only way to avoid major health problems down the line.
    Until now, anyone on a gluten-free diet looking to eat food in restaurants had to rely on lots of detective work, gathering information from menus, word of mouth, intuition, and restaurant workers' advice, with little or no supporting data. 
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    Read more at American Journal of Gastroenterology: March 26, 2019
    Discosure: Nima is a paid advertiser on Celiac.com, but publication of this summary is not influenced by their ad.

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