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    Vatican Bans Gluten-Free Bread for Holy Communion


    Jefferson Adams


    • The Vatican has outlawed gluten-free bread for Catholic communion.


    Image Caption: The Vatican has banned gluten-free bread for Catholic Communion. Photo: CC--Awareness Campaign.

    Celiac.com 07/31/2017 - For a time, it looked like gluten-free Catholics might be able to take full communion with special gluten-free wafers.


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    But, gluten-free Catholics hoping to enjoy both the wine and the bread of a full communion had their hopes dashed this week, when the Church put the kibosh on gluten-free communion wafers.

    The decision was announced in a letter to bishops by Cardinal Robert Sarah, prefect of the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Sacraments, and read, in part:

    "The bread used in the celebration of the Most Holy Eucharistic Sacrifice must be unleavened, purely of wheat, and recently made so that there is no danger of decomposition...It follows therefore that bread made from another substance, even if it is grain, or if it is mixed with another substance different from wheat to such an extent that it would not commonly be considered wheat bread, does not constitute valid matter for confecting the Sacrifice and the Eucharistic Sacrament."

    He has said the bread can be low-gluten, but the wheat must contain enough protein for it to be made without additives.

    According to Roman Catholic doctrine, the bread and wine served at the Eucharist are converted into the body and blood of Christ through a process known as transubstantiation.

    Gluten-free Catholics will still be able to take communion, as the church holds that simply taking the wine is sufficient to receive communion.

    Still, the ruling, which must be followed by the 1.2 billion Catholics around the globe, is bound to disappoint numerous gluten-free members. Share your thoughts below.

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    Guest CeliacCatholic91

    Posted

    As a devout Catholic, I want to be clear about what is going on here. This is NOT NEW. The Church has ALWAYS taught that the Eucharist must be made up of water and wheat (it's a very simple, pure recipe) as that was what Jesus used and we follow His example. If we deviate from that, what's to stop priests from distributing Oreo cookies? Nilla wafers? Pretzels? You have to draw the line somewhere. I have celiac and have been taking the "low gluten" host for 8 years. My doctor regularly checks my antibody levels, and it doesn't register at ALL! These hosts are so small and fall under the FDA approval of 20 parts gluten per million. It's important to check ahead of time at the parish you're attending that good cross-contamination processes are in place. I've never had a bad experience. Taking the wine is also fine. I don't feel left out, because being part of my Church is the most important thing. Please understand Church teaching before you comment on it!

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    You have to choose to follow God or follow organized religion. What was the Lord's intent ...the content of the food or the message?

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    Guest Karen

    Posted

    What most people don't seem to recognize is that if you are sharing a chalice with others who have partaken of altar bread, you are exposing yourself to cross-contamination and gluten with the shared chalice and wine.

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    So God can only perform miracles with bread made of wheat? Hmm... don't let the devil know that millet flour is Jesus Kryptonite. Should be a bigger story, really. The playbook is all laid out for you, Satan.

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    Guest Anna Hamer

    Posted

    Wheat as we know it in modern times is NOT the wheat that Jesus ate. We have genetically modified to the point that more people cannot digest it. Please watch "What´s in the Wheat" movie. It explains so much! And do we really know that what Jesus ate was unleavened (nice fluffy bread in all the paintings!) or was it even wheat? It could have been Teff or other ancient grain.

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    Guest Roger

    Posted

    I wonder what would be done if all the priests and the Pope came down with very serious and life threatening celiac.

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    Guest Sharon

    Posted

    I agree with Kat. It's not about the exact recipe. It's about what taking communion means. Also, in reference to Karen, my church calls those that must eat gluten free to come up first so that we don't use contaminated wine.

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    Guest Linda

    Posted

    The church has distributed low gluten hosts for many years. Many researchers have determined that these are completely safe. Therefore, this article many scare some people from receiving communion and the information should be clarified.

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    Crazy. To think that SOMEONE decided centuries ago that wheat was the only "holy" grain and no variation or change in church policy can be considered. Jesus also went barefoot or wore sandals but I don't see the church dictating that we all do the same. And to suggest that priests will use Oreos in place of wafers is ludicrous.

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    Guest Teresa

    Posted

    I think that if your a Catholic its your choice. But you don't understand what its like to be a celiac and can't have regular bread that has wheat. the bread with no yeast is unleavened. To me God understands people who cant have wheat . And as long as they take communion you are doing it for the right reason this is my thoughts. I am grateful for gluten-free communion bread wafers so I can take it.

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    Guest Helen

    Posted

    Is this a change? The article is not clear if the current low-gluten wafers are still acceptable to the Catholic church. Better reporting, please. Doesn't affect me, I just use the chalice, since occasionally got a reaction to the current low-gluten host. I do see that there is a tradition of using wheat, but how do we know that the Last Supper used wheat bread and not barley? Both were common grains of the time. Pretzels and Nilla wafers would pass the wheat test, by the way, but the dough is not in the unleavened wafer tradition.

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    Guest Lynn Katen

    Posted

    Too bad they aren't as strict with their rules about protecting innocent children. I have a great relationship with God/Jesus/The Holy Spirit and He understands my celiac and my need to be gluten free.

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    Guest Tom Neaman

    Posted

    Children do not consume wine! Here we go again with more man-made decisions based on non-substantiated facts.

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    Guest Sandi Ramirez

    Posted

    We as a new Catholic I was excited to be able to take part in Holy Communion. That is the thing I watched my husband and his family do every Mass for the 25 years I attended before I converted. I am very sad that one of the most important parts of the Mass for me I will not be able to take part in. Let me explain further why...I am deaf and and do not sign. As a late life deaf person who reads lips, I might be able to get part of the Homily, if i am lucky but usually the priest moves around or I can not read his lips. Yes, the Mass is supposed the be the same format but it is not the different parishes we visit so it makes it hard when one is deaf. That makes taking Holy Communion the one thing that was consistent no matter where i went. Now I do not have that even. Yes, If i am lucky I might be the first to get the wine OH wait no the chalice is simply wiped out. No cross contamination. Pope Francis has the ability to change this like his has changed other things in the church. We the Celiacs in the world and Catholics should let him know how it affects our lives both spiritual and health wise. I plan too. I eat Grain, Dairy and Sugar Free Now but this is the ONLY exception I was making was the HOST. Because My Faith is so important to me.

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    Guest Ian Geary

    Posted

    I suppose this could be expected from such a bizarre organization that attempts to interpret the sayings of a man who lived 2000+ years ago but his words were written down a long, long time later. It is totally improvable that Jesus said ´if you are a celiac you must still eat wheat to ruin you small intestine´. If I am wrong then I need to see that written in the new testament. Anyway did not Jesus know about celiacs? What is omnipotence after all?

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    Well, assuming all I've been taught about my religion is true; that God created all of us with Celiac as his children, along with all those who don't have Celiac; and that the wafer is a symbol that has been blessed to become the body of Christ; and that God is almighty and quite capable of love, intelligence, mercy, and assorted creative powers; I believe that he/she would logically be agreeable to any sort of cracker, (gluten-free) oreo, etc. My understanding is that it is the intent of both the representative of God who speaks the blessing of the wine and wafer, and the intent of the one partaking of the sacrament that bring about the wonderful change into the body and blood of Christ. & when it comes right down to it, I'm not really into the idea of drinking other people´s crumbs and drool, either . . . God rules or people rules?

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    Well, this is understandable since the Catholic Church requires that the host *always* conform in absolutely *all* ways to *exactly* how it was made in the Middle East in the First Century: all the same ingredients that were available then, with the same local Palestinian preparation methods, and the same methods of baking the pita or whatever it was. That's why Catholics *never* perform the Eucharist with crackers or leavened European-style bread. Oh, wait? What! They just isolate and focus on this one thing, to the exclusion of literally every other aspect -- simply arbitrarily picking this one ingredient? Even though causes a painful exclusion of people who believe in the ritual? Even though God is supposed to transubstantiate it anway? (I guess they don't believe God is that powerful...) Sounds to me like the Catholic Church really does not want people with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity to be a part of their church.

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    I wonder what would be done if all the priests and the Pope came down with very serious and life threatening celiac.

    Roger, My thoughts exactly. I am sure God is more understanding to those who have celiac and need to have gluten-free bread. Following Jesus is not just about communion but about how we respond to his teachings. Anyway the church has bigger problems to deal with (like current pedophile) than banning gluten-free bread

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    Guest Marie

    Posted

    That is discrimination. And to the CeliacCatholic 91: I read an article about an European nun with celiac disease that kept showing symptoms because she had to take the communion; her doctor did testing and gluten showed-up in her blood. In US the government did studies to come up with the exact amount of gluten that starts to damage the intestine, it is infinitesimal. I remember reading also that a very, very small amount of gluten reacts in the small intestine for 72 hours. Gluten is very teal to me, I would not put my life in jeopardy because of communion, oh, no. I would not do that to myself because my religion ask me to do it ( and I am a catholic); I had enough with my parents dying of cardiomyopathy and complications as a result of senile dementia, I do not want to be another statistic of celiac disease. I better write to Pope Francisco to voice my concerns.

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    Glad I´m a Lutheran. We still have gluten-free wafers.

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    Guest Donna S

    Posted

    Catholics who are tired of being excluded from the Table are welcome to the Table at the Lutheran church where many serve gluten-free bread or wafers. Our church uses gluten-free bread exclusively so everyone is welcomed to the same meal. It's about the only meal all week I don't have to worry what I'm eating. I love it!

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    Guest Susan

    Posted

    I´m not Catholic but my Baptist church has not offered me gluten-free communion wafers in the 10 1/2 years since I was diagnosed, even though they know I have celiac. It would be great if they did but it has just been the juice for me since then.

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    Guest Jacki

    Posted

    The church has distributed low gluten hosts for many years. Many researchers have determined that these are completely safe. Therefore, this article many scare some people from receiving communion and the information should be clarified.

    This article is completely without fact! I have been receiving the low-gluten host for many years and I don't see that coming to an end. It is completely acceptable in the church. Comment from Celiac catholic91 is right on.

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    Guest Retta

    Posted

    It all comes down to faith. In the Catholic church, we believe that God is the only physician, the only healer. People who are Catholic and have celiac disease must have great faith to know that they will not be adversely affected by His body in the Holy Eucharist. Those with little faith and who do not truly believe that the Holy Eucharist is bread that was changed (transubstantiation) into the actual body of Christ, have a chance that they will be adversely affected. We must put all our trust and faith in Him. Faith equals: Father and I, Together there is always Hope.

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    Guest Chris

    Posted

    Which is just another reason I'm glad I wasn't raised in the Catholic faith. The popes have changed "rules" for many years. The wheat in a wafer today is also processed which I'm sure in Jesus day it was totally different. To many people this is very important to take their bread AND wine when they take their communion. Shame on them and their "rules".

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    Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. He has covered Health News for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. His work has appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate, among others.

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    Scott Adams
    Ernesto Guifaldes, M.D. of the Pontificia Unicersidad Catolica de Chile has sent me much information, is particularly knowledgeable in this area. If you have any questions about this subject, please contact Ernesto at: eguirald@lascar.puc.cl
    The following is a letter dated March 10, 1996, and was sent to the Presidents of the Episcopal Conferences from the Vatican. It represents the official position of the Catholic Church with regard to gluten and the Eucharist.
    Your Eminence/Excellency:
    In recent years, this Dicastery has followed closely the development of the question of the use of low-gluten altar breads and mustum as matter for the celebration of the Eucharist.
    After careful study, conducted in collaboration with a number of concerned Episcopal Conferences, this Congregation in its ordinary session of June 22, 1994 has approved the following norms, which I am pleased to communicate:
    I. Concerning permission to use low-gluten altar breads: A. This may be granted by Ordinaries to priests and lay persons affected by celiac disease, after presentation of a medical certificate. Conditions for the validity of the matter: 1) Special hosts quibus glutinum ablatum est are invalid matter for the celebration of the Eucharist; 2) Low-gluten hosts are valid matter, provided that they contain the amount of gluten sufficient to obtain the confection of bread, that there is no addition of foreign materials, and that the procedure for making such hosts is not such as to alter the nature of the substance of the bread. II. Concerning permission to use mustum: A. The preferred solution continues to be Communion per intinctionem, or in concelebration under the species of bread alone. B. Nevertheless, the permission to use mustum can be granted by Ordinaries to priests affected by alcoholism or other conditions which prevent the ingestion of even the smallest quantity of alcohol, after the presentation of a medical certificate. C. By mustum is understood fresh juice from grapes, or juice preserved by suspending its fermentation (by means of freezing of other methods which do not alter its nature). D. In general, those who have received permission to use the mustum are prohibited from presiding at concelebrated Masses. There may be some exceptions however: in the case of a Bishop or Superior General; or, with prior approval of the Ordinary, at the celebration of the anniversary of priestly ordination or other similar occasions. In these cases, the one who presides is to communicate under both the species of bread and that of the mustum, while for the other concelebrants a chalice shall be provided in which normal wine is to be consecrated. E. In the very rare instances of lay persons requesting this permission, recourse must be made to the Holy See. III. Common Norms: A. The Ordinary must ascertain that the matter used conforms to the above requirements. B. Permissions are to be given only for as long as the situation continues which motivated the request. C. Scandal is to be avoided. D. Given the centrality of the celebration of the Eucharist in the life of the priest, candidates for the priesthood who are affected by celiac disease of suffer from alcoholism of similar conditions may not be admitted to Holy Orders. E. Since the doctrinal questions in this area have now been decided, disciplinary competence is entrusted to the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments. F. Concerned Episcopal Conferences shall report to the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments every two years regarding the application of these norms. With warm regards and best wishes, I am Sincerely yours in Christ.

    The leader of the fight for Celiacs in the Catholic Church has recently died. Archbishop Derek Worlock of Liverpool was diagnosed in the 1980s with celiac disease and presented a strong case in Rome for celiac sufferers to be allowed to receive special hosts at Communion, which was reluctantly granted. He died of lung cancer on February 8, 1996.

    Scott Adams
    (Celiac.com 05/14/2000) Some bishops conferences (e.g.: Chile) have allowed communicants to take communion in the form of consacrated wine alone. Nowadays, in some countries (the U.K. for instance), wafers made of wheat which contains only traces of gluten - and hence probably not deletereous for the celiac patient - are being made. The Vatican has allowed the use of such wafers through a statement of the Congregation for the Doctrine of Faith of June 19th, 1995.
    The Bishops Conference of England and Wales, for instance, has stated recently that they follow the 1995 norms on low-gluten altar breads from the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith. In implementing these norms, the Conference established a certificate for those affected by the coeliac condition. This is then administered in the local diocese.
    The following comes from the report of the English and Welsh bishops meeting of November 1997. Certificate for coeliac sufferers:
    At its Low Week 1996 meeting, the Bishops Conference asked that its advisory panel on the coeliac condition draw up a suitable certificate for use by those with the coeliac condition to show that they have received permission for the use of low-gluten altar breads as valid matter for the celebration of Mass. Such a certificate was approved by the Bishops Conference. Britain has one of the highest rates of the coeliac condition in the world. This certificate enables sufferers to present a low-gluten host for consecration, particularly when traveling and in regions where they are not known by the priest. Those with the condition may obtain the certificate by applying to their parish priest. - Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, norms concerning the use of low-gluten altar breads and mustum [non-alcoholic wine] as matter for the celebration of the Eucharist, 22 June 1995.
    I. Concerning permission to use low-gluten altar breads: A. This may be granted by Ordinaries to priests and laypersons affected by celiac disease, after presentation of a medical certificate. B. Conditions for the validity of the matter: 1. Special hosts quibus glutinum ablatum est are invalid matter for the celebration of the Eucharist; 2. Low-gluten hosts are valid matter, provided that they contain the amount of gluten sufficient to obtain the confection of bread, that there is no addition of foreign materials, and that the procedure for making such hosts is not such as to alter the nature of the substance of the bread. II. Concerning permission to use mustum: A. The preferred solution continues to be Communion per intinctionem, or in concelebration under the species of bread alone. B. Nevertheless, the permission to use mustum can be granted by Ordinaries to priests affected by alcoholism or other conditions which prevent the ingestion of even the smallest quantity of alcohol, after presentation of a medical certificate. C. By mustum is understood fresh juice from grapes, or juice preserved by suspending its fermentation (by means of freezing or other methods which do not alter its nature). D. In general, those who have received permission to use mustum are prohibited from presiding at concelebrated Masses. There may be some exceptions however: in the case of a Bishop or Superior General; or, with prior approval of the Ordinary, at the celebration of the anniversary of priestly ordination or other similar occasions. In these cases, the one who presides is to communicate under both the species of bread and that of mustum, while for the other concelebrants a chalice shall be provided in which normal wine is to be consecrated. E. In the very rare instances of laypersons requesting this permission, recourse must be made to the Holy See. III. Common Norms: A. The Ordinary must ascertain that the matter used conforms to the above requirements. B. Permissions are to be given only for as long as the situation continues which motivated the request. C. Scandal is to be avoided. D. Given the centrality of the celebration of the Eucharist in the life of the priest, candidates for the priesthood who are affected by celiac disease or suffer from alcoholism or similar conditions may not be admitted to Holy Orders. E. Since the doctrinal questions in this area have now been decided, disciplinary competence is entrusted to the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments. F. Concerned Episcopal Conferences shall report to the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments every two years regarding the application of these norms. Thanks are given to Tom Horwood, Esq., Catholic Media Office, The Bishops Conference of England and Wales, and to Ernesto Guifaldes, M.D. of the Pontificia Unicersidad Catolica de Chile.

    According to the UK Coeliac Society you can now obtain gluten-free Communion Wafers from the following:
    Eiren Religious Supplies
    Concord House
    Union Drive
    Sutton Coldfield
    West Midlands
    IB73 5TE
    UK

    Scott Adams
    Celiac.com 08/02/2002 - The Bishops National Liturgy Office in Italy recently approved a low-gluten Eucharistic host made by a specific German firm for use by worshippers who have celiac disease. The hosts have been approved by the scientific committee of the Italian Celiac Association and are made using Codex Alimentarius quality wheat starch that contains 0.0374 milligrams of gluten. Additionally, the Vaticans Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith has also approved the hosts for use in the Eucharist. According to the Catholic Church the bread used in the Eucharist must be made exclusively from wheat, and the German-made hosts are currently the only ones produced that meet all of the Catholic Churchs requirements.
    This decision creates controversy, however, between worshippers with celiac disease in Europe and the United States, mainly due to the differing opinion with regard to whether those with celiac disease need to be on a 100% gluten-free diet. Since support groups and some segments of the American scientific community advocate a 100% gluten-free diet, the Catholic Church recommends that worshippers with celiac disease in the United States only receive communion if the form of consecrated wine.

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    Celiac.com 11/26/2014 - Catholics with celiac disease received some hopeful news recently, when the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops voted overwhelmingly in favor of drafting of a revision to the Guidelines for the Celebration of the Sacraments with Persons with Disabilities. The vote was 207 bishops in favor and one against, with one abstention.
    The bishops voted to change the guideline to accommodate people with celiac disease and others who cannot consume wheat, and have been unable to take full communion.
    Because churches are required to serve communion wafers that contain wheat, numerous people have been unable to consume the wafers, and have thereby been missing out on what many deem to be a crucial part of communion.
    Some Catholic churches have tried to accommodate people with celiac disease and gluten sensitivities by offering low-gluten communion wafers. However, even the low-gluten versions approved by the church generally did not meet the FDA standards requiring less than 20 parts per million of gluten, and were thus unacceptable to many with celiac disease or severe gluten sensitivity. For these people, even small amounts of the wheat gluten can cause health problems.
    Exactly what changes the bishops will make regarding the Eucharistic wafer remain to be seen. Ideally, the new guidelines will permit wafers that are safe for people with celiac disease, and which will permit them to enjoy full communion.
    How do you feel about this? Is it welcome news? Do you know any catholics who’ve been missing out on communion? Stay tuned for more news on the new guidelines.
    Here, you’ll find a copy of the November 2014 USCCB General Assembly Agenda Item Vote Results.

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    They are variously associated with the Department of Undiagnosed Celiac Disease More Common in Women and Girls International Health, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America; the Respiratory Epidemiology, Occupational Medicine and Public Health, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; the Section of Paediatrics, Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; the Centre for Statistics in Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom; the Division of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom; the Centre of Evidence Based Dermatology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom; and Stanford University in the USA.
    Team members searched MEDLINE, Excerpta Medica dataBASE (EMBASE), Web of Science, Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and Literatura Latino Americana em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS) for observational studies conducted between January 1946 and July 2013, and interventional studies conducted through December 2017, that evaluated the relationship between diet during pregnancy, lactation, or the first year of life, and future risk of allergic or autoimmune disease. 
    They then selected studies, extracted data, and assessed bias risk. They evaluated data using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE). They found 260 original studies, covering 964,143 participants, of milk feeding, including 1 intervention trial of breastfeeding promotion, and 173 original studies, covering 542,672 participants, of other maternal or infant dietary exposures, including 80 trials of 26 maternal, 32 infant, or 22 combined interventions. 
    They found a high bias risk in nearly half of the more than 250 milk feeding studies and in about one-quarter of studies of other dietary exposures. Evidence from 19 intervention trials suggests that oral supplementation with probiotics during late pregnancy and lactation may reduce risk of eczema. 44 cases per 1,000; 95% CI 20–64), and 6 trials, suggest that fish oil supplementation during pregnancy and lactation may reduce risk of allergic sensitization to egg. GRADE certainty of these findings was moderate. 
    The team found less evidence, and low GRADE certainty, for claims that breastfeeding reduces eczema risk during infancy, that longer exclusive breastfeeding is associated with reduced type 1 diabetes mellitus, and that probiotics reduce risk of infants developing allergies to cow’s milk. 
    They found no evidence that dietary exposure to other factors, including prebiotic supplements, maternal allergenic food avoidance, and vitamin, mineral, fruit, and vegetable intake, influence risk of allergic or autoimmune disease. 
    Overall, the team’s findings support a connection between the mother’s diet and risk of immune-mediated diseases in the child. Maternal probiotic and fish oil supplementation may reduce risk of eczema and allergic sensitization to food, respectively.
    Stay tuned for more on diet during pregnancy and its role in celiac disease.
    Source:
    PLoS Med. 2018 Feb; 15(2): e1002507. doi:  10.1371/journal.pmed.1002507

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/17/2018 - What can fat soluble vitamin levels in newly diagnosed children tell us about celiac disease? A team of researchers recently assessed fat soluble vitamin levels in children diagnosed with newly celiac disease to determine whether vitamin levels needed to be assessed routinely in these patients during diagnosis.
    The researchers evaluated the symptoms of celiac patients in a newly diagnosed pediatric group and evaluated their fat soluble vitamin levels and intestinal biopsies, and then compared their vitamin levels with those of a healthy control group.
    The research team included Yavuz Tokgöz, Semiha Terlemez and Aslıhan Karul. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, the Department of Pediatrics, and the Department of Biochemistry at Adnan Menderes University Medical Faculty in Aydın, Turkey.
    The team evaluated 27 female, 25 male celiac patients, and an evenly divided group of 50 healthy control subjects. Patients averaged 9 years, and weighed 16.2 kg. The most common symptom in celiac patients was growth retardation, which was seen in 61.5%, with  abdominal pain next at 51.9%, and diarrhea, seen in 11.5%. Histological examination showed nearly half of the patients at grade Marsh 3B. 
    Vitamin A and vitamin D levels for celiac patients were significantly lower than the control group. Vitamin A and vitamin D deficiencies were significantly more common compared to healthy subjects. Nearly all of the celiac patients showed vitamin D insufficiency, while nearly 62% showed vitamin D deficiency. Nearly 33% of celiac patients showed vitamin A deficiency. 
    The team saw no deficiencies in vitamin E or vitamin K1 among celiac patients. In the healthy control group, vitamin D deficiency was seen in 2 (4%) patients, vitamin D insufficiency was determined in 9 (18%) patients. The team found normal levels of all other vitamins in the healthy group.
    Children with newly diagnosed celiac disease showed significantly reduced levels of vitamin D and A. The team recommends screening of vitamin A and D levels during diagnosis of these patients.
    Source:
    BMC Pediatrics

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/16/2018 - Did weak public oversight leave Arizonans ripe for Theranos’ faulty blood tests scam? Scandal-plagued blood-testing company Theranos deceived Arizona officials and patients by selling unproven, unreliable products that produced faulty medical results, according to a new book by Wall Street Journal reporter, whose in-depth, comprehensive investigation of the company uncovered deceit, abuse, and potential fraud.
    Moreover, Arizona government officials facilitated the deception by providing weak regulatory oversight that essentially left patients as guinea pigs, said the book’s author, investigative reporter John Carreyrou. 
    In the newly released "Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup," Carreyrou documents how Theranos and its upstart founder, Elizabeth Holmes, used overblown marketing claims and questionable sales tactics to push faulty products that resulted in consistently faulty blood tests results. Flawed results included tests for celiac disease and numerous other serious, and potentially life-threatening, conditions.
    According to Carreyrou, Theranos’ lies and deceit made Arizonans into guinea pigs in what amounted to a "big, unauthorized medical experiment.” Even though founder Elizabeth Holmes and Theranos duped numerous people, including seemingly savvy investors, Carreyrou points out that there were public facts available to elected officials back then, like a complete lack of clinical data on the company's testing and no approvals from the Food and Drug Administration for any of its tests.
    SEC recently charged the now disgraced Holmes with what it called a 'years-long fraud.’ The company’s value has plummeted, and it is now nearly worthless, and facing dozens, and possibly hundreds of lawsuits from angry investors. Meantime, Theranos will pay Arizona consumers $4.65 million under a consumer-fraud settlement Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich negotiated with the embattled blood-testing company.
    Both investors and Arizona officials, “could have picked up on those things or asked more questions or kicked the tires more," Carreyrou said. Unlike other states, such as New York, Arizona lacks robust laboratory oversight that would likely have prevented Theranos from operating in those places, he added.
    Stay tuned for more new on how the Theranos fraud story plays out.
    Read more at azcentral.com.