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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Would You Like Your Gluten-Free Food Printed, Sir?

      Will printed food be the future of eating, gluten-free and otherwise?

    Caption: Photo: CC--John Abella

    Celiac.com 12/11/2017 - With blazing progress in 3D printing technology, the future of numerous fields from house building to cake-making and, yes, cooking, is literally being written, or printed, before our very eyes.

    Food is definitely one of those arenas that will see major influence for 3d printing. In the future, more and more kitchens will come with one of more 3d printers that deliver highly customized food choices for chefs, on demand.

    Currently, platform for 3D printing personalized food are being developed for numerous applications, including gluten-free, vegetarian, vegan, and other specialized diet markets.

    In a talk presented at the 3D Printing and Beyond: Current and Future Trends conference at Hebrew university on October 25, Prof. Ido Braslavsky presented breakthrough 3D-printing innovations by Israeli and international experts from academia and industry. The conference was organized by the 3D & Functional Printing Center at the Hebrew University and Yissum, with the support of the Jerusalem Development Authority, the Ministry of Jerusalem Affairs and the Jerusalem Municipality.

    One breakthrough touted by Baslavsky was the ability to use 3D food printing to serve "numerous populations including the gluten-free, vegetarian and vegan markets, as well as the specialized diet market, for anyone from athletes to people with diabetes or celiac disease."

    In the very near future, chefs will be able to use a single machine to automatically prepare, mix, form and cook personalized food. Yaron Daniely, head of the university’s Yissum Research & Development technology-transfer company, called the technology nothing short of revolutionary.

    The self-assembly properties of nano-cellulose fibers enable the addition and binding of proteins, carbohydrates and fats as well as controlling the food’s texture. The food products could then be cooked, baked, fried or grilled while being printed out in the three dimensional space.

    "The idea is to enable full control of the substances used, for the purpose of creating healthy and tasty meals that can be eaten immediately. This has the potential to address a variety of challenges facing the field of nutrition, from the demand for personalized food … to addressing the problem of lack of food in developing countries," said Daniely.

    Will printed food be the future of eating, gluten-free and otherwise? Stay tuned for more news on that front.

    Read more at: Israel21c.org



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    This is really gross. Near the birthplace of wheat, barley and the most toxic grains, they are furthering the unhealthy assault of super-processed toxic “food†and “In the very near future, chefs will be able to use a single machine to†thoroughly cross-contaminate celiac patients.

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    This is really gross. Near the birthplace of wheat, barley and the most toxic grains, they are furthering the unhealthy assault of super-processed toxic “food†and “In the very near future, chefs will be able to use a single machine to†thoroughly cross-contaminate celiac patients.

    I think the idea of the article was that chefs might one day be able NOT to cross contaminate by using a new technology!

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    What I found repulsive in this story was the idea of "self-assembly properties of nano-cellulose fibers enable the addition and binding of proteins, carbohydrates and fats as well as controlling the food's texture" - since going gluten-free following a celiac diagnosis, we eat far more fresh, non-processed foods - veg, fruits, nuts, meats - and have no desire to add nano-cellulose fibers to our diet.

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    This is really gross. Near the birthplace of wheat, barley and the most toxic grains, they are furthering the unhealthy assault of super-processed toxic “food†and “In the very near future, chefs will be able to use a single machine to†thoroughly cross-contaminate celiac patients.

    I think the article says the opposite of what you are concluding. I think the idea is that technology can help to create safe gluten-free options.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, science, and advanced research, and scientific methods. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 09/05/2016 - Currently, a gluten-free diet is the only recommended treatment for celiac disease. But, researchers don't know much about how effective the actually diet is, or exactly what constitutes the normal range of responses among persons with celiac disease on a gluten-free diet.
    To get a better idea, a team of researchers recently set out to study a group adults with biopsy proven, newly diagnosed celiac disease. The research team included J. A. Silvester, L. A. Graff, L. Rigaux, J. R. Walker & D. R. Duerksen, variously affiliated with the College of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada, the Celiac Research Program at Harvard Medical School in Boston, MA, USA, and the St Boniface Hospital, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.
    The team had each patient complete a survey related to diet adherence and reactions to gluten at entry and 6 months. To measure celiac disease symptoms and gluten-free diet adherence, the team used the Celiac Symptom Index, Celiac Diet Assessment Tool (CDAT) and Gluten-Free Eating Assessment Tool (gluten-free-EAT), and they assessed a total of 105 participants, 91% of whom reported gluten exposure less than once per month, and showed an average CDAT score was 9 (IQR 8–11), consistent with adequate adherence.
    Two-thirds of the subjects reported suspected symptomatic reaction to gluten. For 63% of subjects, gluten consumption was only suspected after a reaction occurred. For nearly 30%, gluten consumption was the result of eating in a restaurant. Gluten consumed came from cross-contamination in 30% of cases, and from gluten as a major ingredient in 10% of cases. On average, symptoms began an hour after gluten consumption, running from 10 minutes on the low end to 48 hours on the high end.
    On average, when symptoms did occur, they lasted about 24 hours, on average; though they ranged from 1 hour to 8 days. Common symptoms included abdominal pain in 80%, diarrhea in 52%, fatigue in 33%, headache in 30% and irritability in 29% of patients.
    Adverse gluten reactions are common in people with celiac disease on a gluten-free diet. Eating away from home, especially at restaurants and other homes, carries the greatest risk for gluten exposure.
    The team encourages doctors who treat people with celiac disease to question their patients about adverse gluten reactions as part of their assessment of gluten-free diet adherence.
    How often do you get exposed to gluten? What happens?
    Source:
    Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/09/2017 - For years, industry observers, health experts and even food companies have questioned the staying power of gluten-free food.
    With more people than ever embracing gluten-free products and gluten-free diets, including a majority of folks who do not have celiac disease, gluten-free food has never been more popular. There have also never been more gluten-free products hitting store shelves.
    Couple that with the fact that U.S. sales of gluten-free products are projected to exceed $2 billion by 2019, and the market for gluten-free products looks as solid as ever.
    But, do hidden caveats await potential investors, especially on the retail end? Maybe.
    There's a great article over at Fooddive.com about the challenges of succeeding in the gluten-free grocery business especially on the retail end.
    The article interviews a number of major gluten-free retailers, and notes that the higher margins and intense customer loyalty that come with gluten-free products also come with warning signs that may portend a looming downturn.
    Far from being doom-and-gloom, the article includes some interesting insights on the strategies and tactics being used by retailers to bolster their gluten-free sales.
    Read more at Fooddive.com.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/04/2017 - Japan's ANA airline is catching some public relations heat this week after reports that a man flying from Tokyo to Australia received a banana instead of the gluten-free meal that he booked in advance.
    London resident, and celiac disease sufferer, Martin Pavelka flew All Nippon Airways flight from Tokyo this week, a nine-hour flight.
    Numerous media have reported Mr. Pavelka's plights in glaring terms, such as the Independent's alarming headline: Man Given Banana as Gluten-free "Meal"Â on Nine hour Flight, with the equally sensational sidebar: Londoner flying from Tokyo to Sydney was handed a banana as the gluten-free inflight "meal." However, a closer reading shows those claims to be pretty misleading.
    The fact is that Mr. Pavelka did receive his specially-ordered gluten-free meal at dinner, shortly after departure. The banana was part of the breakfast meal, the second meal service for the flight, which is where the trouble began for Mr Pavelka, who said he was "expecting something more substantial."Â
    "All other passengers were served full breakfast meal consisting of eggs, sausage, mushrooms, bread, and yogurt,"Â Pavelka told the Standard, while all he received was a single banana,"Â which though "definitely gluten free…did not keep me full for very long."Â
    So, let's add this all up. On a nine-hour flight, Mr. Pavelka received his special gluten-free meal for dinner, and then about 5 hours later, about 2 hours or so before landing, he received a banana in lieu of a full breakfast? But he wanted more? And this is a new story?
    In the account given by the Standard, Mr. Pavelka's first words to the flight attendant were "is this some kind of joke?"Â Not exactly diplomatic language. Nor, by the Standard's account did Mr. Pavelka ask for anything more, such as a yogurt, or additional fruit?
    Clearly Mr. Pavelka received less food at breakfast than the other passengers, but the food was gluten-free, as was his earlier dinner. It's entirely reasonable for Mr. Pavelka to expect to be treated like the other passengers, and to receive more for breakfast.
    However, without more detail, it's hard to know exactly what ANA offered at the time of booking, or whether there was some kind of mix-up with the caterers who provide meals, including specialty meals, to ANA. Do we know for sure that ANA actually offered a full gluten-free breakfast on that flight? Or that Mr. Pavelka was promised one? That said, both Mr. Pavelka and the newspapers covering the story owe it to the public to be more clear and less sensational about the actual facts. Expecting two gluten-free meals, and receiving one gluten-free meal and a banana is a very different story than just receiving a banana.
    Reports that the banana was the only gluten-free food ANA provided Mr. Pavelka for the entire nine-hour flight are simply wrong. ANA in fact provided Mr. Pavelka with a gluten-free dinner. The Standard managed to bury that important detail in paragraph ten of an eighteen paragraph article, while the Independent slipped it into paragraph seven of a thirteen paragraph article. Both papers carefully avoid mentioning the fact that the dinner was gluten-free.
    The paragraph in the Standard reads: "Although he had been given a larger meal the previous evening when his flight left, Mr Pavelka said he was expecting something more substantial for breakfast."Â
    Yet, somehow, the Standard published the story under the fact-mashed title, "Londoner who ordered gluten free meal on nine-hour flight is given a single banana to eat with knife and fork."
    Both the newspapers and Mr. Pavelka seem focused on spinning a story that the banana was the only food ANA provided Mr. Pavelka during the flight, which was simply not the case.
    Such obfuscation, presumably in search of readership, does little to provide clarity on the actual details, and much to cause doubt and confusion about what are actually fairly simple, if inconvenient, facts to a fairly mundane, and not-altogether newsworthy, story.
    If Mr. Pavelka received only a banana for his nine-hour flight, that would truly be an outrage. If he received a gluten-free meal, plus a banana, that would be an inconvenience. The story was presented as an outrage, when the facts indicated it was clearly more of an inconvenience.
    This article was revised for clarity by the author on 5/10/2017.
    Read more:
    The Standard.co.uk Metro.co.uk The Independent.co.uk

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 11/24/2017 - Do you have an emergency survival kit at home should disaster strike? Does that include drinking water and gluten-free provisions for at least a few days?
    The fallout from the latest string of disasters still looms over parts of America; over Houston, Florida and neighboring states devastated by Hurricanes and by resulting floods; and over northern California communities devastated by wildfires.
    That got us thinking about emergency kits. Gluten-Free-free emergency kits, to be precise.
    What's in Your Emergency Gluten-Free Food Kit? This list is by no means authoritative or final. In fact, we are inviting you to share any favorites or ideas you may have for your own emergency kit.
    Your Gluten-free Emergency Kit should include the following:
    Water: You'll need a minimum of 3 days worth of drinking water for ever person. This includes water for cooking and other non-drinking uses. When it comes to water, it never hurts to have more than you need, so consider stocking even more than a 3 day supply. Food: When assembling a survival kit, you want to put together a kit that will feed each family member family 2 cups of prepared meals 3 times a day. Canned foods like black beans are essential. Any of the following food items are good to have in your kit:
    Rice, Quinoa and Other Gluten-free Grains: Organic grains like rice and quinoa make great additions to an emergency kit. Be sure to soak your grains before you cook them. If you're on a grain-free diet, quinoa works well, if you can tolerate it. Dried Potatoes: Dried potato flakes can be used to make mashed potatoes. Pasta: Gluten-free pasta are good additions to any emergency kit. Gluten-free Crackers or other snacks: Gluten-free crackers can be part of a no-cook meal, especially when combined with canned tuna or other fish. Canned Pasta Sauces: If you're stocking gluten-free pasta, then be sure to stock your favorite pasta sauce. Pomí makes a boxed pasta sauce that packs easily for emergency storage. There are a number of canned pasta sauces on the market, so stock whatever you like. Canned and Dried Meats: Jerky, Spam, Dried Salami, and Canned Tuna or other Fish make excellent additions to any emergency kit. Homemade jerky can be kept in an air-tight container for about a year. It's a great source of protein, and a great no-cook snack with options like beef, bison, pork, turkey and salmon. Spices and Gluten-free Bouillon cubes or packets: Since you may be making things like rice, or quinoa, or other things that may need some spices to lively them up, spices are a smart addition to your emergency kit. Make sure yours are gluten-free. Keep your kit in a cool, dry place that can be reached in an emergency. Consider building your kit around a printed menu that can be prepared with the items you have stocked. Remember, since gas and electric may not be functioning in an emergency, you may not have full cooking facilities, so plan meals that you can make with minimal preparation and fuss.
    Want someone to make your emergency kit for you? Check out https://www.emergencykits.com/emergency-food/gluten-free.
     

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