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    • Scott Adams

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/24/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What is Celiac Disease and the Gluten-Free Diet? What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    Grindstone Bakery for Stone Ground Gluten-Free Breads and Cookies


    Grindstone Bakery was founded in 1999 by Mario Repetto. Mario started in a small "garage" in Santa Rosa, California, experimenting with alternatives to modern wheat and creating fermentation cultures for an authentic sourdough process. Our fermentation cultures are the result of years of capturing and experimenting with different combinations of the wild lactic acid bacteria naturally present in the Sonoma Wine Country environment. We call them “Sonoma Cultures”. Each one has a particular ecosystem of several lactic acid bacteria strains allowing us to create different breads with a relatively lower acid content than most sourdoughs, rich in flavor and color and resistant to spoilage without the use of preservatives.


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    Ancient Bread Making for Health and Delight
    Stone milling is the oldest, slowest, and best method of grinding Whole Grains. It is a gentle and cool process that preserves every good part of the grain. All the protein, oils, antioxidants and vitamins from the germ, all the sugars and starches from the endosperm, and the tiny bits of bran rich in antioxidants and fiber are there. Nothing is added and nothing is taken away.

    We slowly grind our Whole Grains using a small natural pink granite stone mill that never overheats the flour. We transform it into living dough within hours of being ground.

    In today’s completely automated milling process, steel rollers crush the grain at remarkably high speeds heating it to elevated temperatures and destroying vitamins and antioxidants.

    Whole Grains are seeds coming from plants that, over millions of years, have developed the capacity to synthesize myriad phytochemicals that help them resist pathogens, parasites and predators, or attract beneficial organisms. We call these beneficial phytochemicals antioxidants. Our modern understanding on how they function in plants is helping us to discover the mechanisms by which Whole Grains benefit human health beyond basic nutrition. More than 8,000 phytochemicals have been identified, but a large number still remain unknown.

    For more info visit: grindstonebakery.com.


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  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams

    This recipe comes to us from Janet Wolkenstein
    1 ¼ cups yellow corn meal
    ½ cup white rice flour
    ¼ cup tapioca flour
    ¼ cup sugar
    2 teaspoons baking powder
    ½ teaspoon salt
    1 cup skim milk
    ¼ cup vegetable oil
    1 egg, beaten
    Combine dry ingredients in a bowl and stir together until evenly mixed. Stir in milk, oil, and egg and mix just until dry ingredients are moistened. Pour batter into a greased 8 or 9 inch pan (or can use muffin tins if desired). Bake at 400 for 20-25 minutes or until light golden brown and wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean. Makes about 8-9 servings.
    You can substitute 1/3 cup dry milk and 1 cup water for the skim milk, or a gluten-free non-dairy milk substitute if
    needed.

    Scott Adams
    ½ cup amaranth flour
    ½ cup tapioca flour
    2 teaspoon arrowroot powder
    2 teaspoon light, cold-pressed oil
    ½ cup water
    1/3-2/3 cup extra flour for kneading
    Sift the flours with the arrowroot powder. In a separate bowl, mix the oil and water, then add to the flour mixture. Work the dough with a fork and then your hands. Knead briefly and roll into a ball. Divide the ball into 8 parts. Roll each part into a ball and pat flat. Sprinkle each bread with flour and roll between 2 sheets of waxed paper with a rolling pin. Turn frequently while rolling, and lift the waxed paper occasionally to add flour so the dough does not stick. The bread should be rounded and about 1/8 inch thick.
    Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Lightly oil a frying pan and heat to medium-high. Put one flatbread in the pan and heat 15-20 seconds on each side. Immediately put bread in oven and heat 3 minutes. Turn over and heat 1 ½ - 2 more minutes. The bread will puff up a bit in the oven, but not as much as traditional pita because it has no yeast. Re-oil the pan with a paper towel dipped in oil, and repeat procedure for each flatbread. Cool breads before storing in plastic bags. Makes 8 breads.

    Scott Adams

    This recipe comes to us from Gladys Jones.
    Ingredients:
    1 ½ cups amaranth flour
    ½ cup arrowroot starch
    1 teaspoon baking soda
    ½ teaspoon salt
    ¾ teaspoon ginger
    1 teaspoon cinnamon
    ¼ teaspoon allspice
    2/3 cup warm water
    ¼ cup oil
    1/3 cup honey
    2 tablespoons lemon juice
    Directions:
    Preheat oven to 350°F.
    Grease 8 or 9 inch baking dish. Combine dry ingredients and sift them into bowl, mixing well. Combine liquids in one pint measuring cup or small bowl and mix with fork or whisk. Pour over dry ingredients all at once and mix quickly. Pour immediately into baking dish and bake for 30 minutes. When done, cracks appear and top springs back when touched. Best if served warm.


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 11/29/2010 - Recent archeological evidence in the form of starch from ground grains found at Stone Age sites suggests early modern humans also consumed various kinds of flour, not just meat alone.
    For decades, there has been ample evidence to support meat-eating by early humans. Evidence such as stone blades used for hunting and animal bones bearing cut-marks have been are common finds. This evidence has supported a view that early humans were nearly total carnivores. 
    In contrast, very little evidence has been found to show plant and grain consumption. This may be due, at least in part to the lower environmental impact of plant use; plants leave far fewer traces.
    The evidence was partially obscured by standard archaeological practice of washing the grinding tools used to process plants, removing any preserved plant matter.
    In the latest discovery, scientists found flour residues on 30,000-year-old grinding stones from Italy, Russia and the Czech Republic. This indicates widespread processing and consumption of plant grains, according to Laura Longo, an archaeologist at the University of Siena in Italy and an author on the paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
    These new finds provide some of the first evidence that early humans ate ground flour 20,000 years before the dawn of agriculture.
    "It's another nail in the coffin of the idea that hunter–gatherers didn't use plants for food," says Ofer Bar-Yosef, a Harvard University archaeologist not involved in the study.
    Additional work in recent years has also revealed a handful of Stone Age sites in the Near East with evidence for plant-eating.
    Source:

    18 October 2010 | Nature | doi:10.1038

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/26/2018 - If you haven’t tried a savory pancake, then you’ve been missing out. In many places in the world, savory pancakes are more common than the sweet pancakes. They make a great lunch or dinner twist. This gluten-free version combines scallions and peas, but feel free to add or subtract veggies at will. Serve pancakes them warm with butter for a delicious twist on lunch or dinner.
    Ingredients:
    3 large eggs 1 cup cottage cheese ½ stick salted butter, melted ¼ cup all-purpose gluten-free flour 2 tablespoons vegetable oil plus more for skillet 1 cup shelled fresh or frozen peas, thawed 4 scallions, thinly sliced, plus more for serving 1 teaspoon kosher salt plus more, as desired Directions:
    If using fresh peas, blanch the peas about 3 minutes in a small saucepan of boiling salted water until tender, about 3 minutes (don’t cook frozen peas). Drain well.
    In a blender, add eggs, cottage cheese, flour, 2 tablespoons oil, and 1 teaspoon salt, and purée until smooth. 
    Transfer batter to a medium bowl and stir in peas and scallions. 
    Batter should be thick but pourable; stir in water by tablespoonfuls if too thick.
    Heat a lightly oiled large nonstick skillet over medium heat. 
    Working in batches, add batter to skillet by ¼-cupfuls to form 3-inch-4-inch rounds. 
    Cook pancakes about 3 minutes, until bubbles form on top. 
    Flip and cook until pancakes are browned on bottom and the centers are just cooked through, about 2 minutes longer.
    Serve pancakes drizzled with butter and topped with scallions.
    Inspired by bonappetit.com.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/25/2018 - People with celiac disease need to follow a lifelong gluten-free diet. However, once their guts have healed, they can still be sensitive to gluten. Sometimes even more sensitive than they were before they went gluten-free. Accidental ingestion of gluten can trigger symptoms in celiac patients, such as pain in the gut and diarrhea, and can also cause intestinal damage. 
    A new drug being developed by a company called Amgen eases the effects of people with celiac disease on a gluten-free diet. Researchers working on the drug have announced that their proof-of-concept study shows AMG 714, an anti-IL-15 monoclonal antibody, potentially protects celiac patients from inadvertent gluten exposure by blocking interleukin 15, an important mediator of celiac disease, and leads to fewer symptoms following gluten exposure.
    The drug is intended for people with celiac disease who are following a gluten-free diet, and is designed to protect against modest gluten contamination, not to permit consumption of large amounts of gluten, like bread or pasta.
    AMG 714 is not designed for celiac patients to eat gluten at will, but for small, incidental contamination. Francisco Leon, MD, PhD, study director and consultant for Amgen, says that their team is looking at AMG 714 “for its potential to protect against modest contamination, not deliberately eating large amounts of gluten, like bread or pasta.” 
    Amgen hopes that AMG 714 will help celiac patients on a gluten-free diet to experience fewer or less sever gluten-triggered events.
    Findings of the team’s first phase 2 study of a biologic immune modulator in celiac disease will be presented at the upcoming Digestive Disease Week 2018. 
    Read more at ScienceDaily.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/24/2018 - England is facing some hard questions about gluten-free food prescriptions for people with celiac disease. Under England’s National Health Plan, people with celiac disease are eligible for gluten-free foods as part of their medical treatment. 
    The latest research shows that prescription practice for gluten-free foods varies widely, and often seems independent of medical factors. This news has put those prescribing practices under scrutiny.
    "Gluten free prescribing is clearly in a state of flux at the moment, with an apparent rapid reduction in prescribing nationally," say the researchers. Their data analysis revealed that after a steady increase in prescriptions between 1998 and 2010, the prescription rate for gluten free foods has both fallen, and become more variable, in recent years. Not only is there tremendous variation in gluten free prescribing, say the researchers, “this variation appears to exist largely without good reason…”
    Worse still, the research showed that those living in the most deprived areas of the country are the least likely to be prescribed gluten-free products, possibly due to a lower rate of celiac diagnosis in disadvantaged groups, say the researchers.
    But following a public consultation, the government decided earlier this year to restrict the range of gluten free products rather than banning them outright. As research data pile up and gluten-free food becomes cheaper and more ubiquitous, look for more changes to England’s gluten-free prescription program to follow. 
    Read more about this research in the online journal BMJ Open.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/23/2018 - Yes, we at Celiac.com realize that rye bread is not gluten-free, and is not suitable for consumption by people with celiac disease!  That is also true of rye bread that is low in FODMAPs.
    FODMAPs are Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides and Polyols. FODMAPS are molecules found in food, and can be poorly absorbed by some people. Poor FODMAP absorption can cause celiac-like symptoms in some people. FODMAPs have recently emerged as possible culprits in both celiac disease and in irritable bowel syndrome.
    In an effort to determine what, if any, irritable bowel symptoms may triggered by FODMAPs, a team of researchers recently set out to compare the effects of regular vs low-FODMAP rye bread on irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms and to study gastrointestinal conditions with SmartPill.
    A team of researchers compared low-FODMAP rye bread with regular rye bread in patients irritable bowel syndrome, to see if rye bread low FODMAPs would reduce hydrogen excretion, lower intraluminal pressure, raise colonic pH, improve transit times, and reduce IBS symptoms compared to regular rye bread. The research team included Laura Pirkola, Reijo Laatikainen, Jussi Loponen, Sanna-Maria Hongisto, Markku Hillilä, Anu Nuora, Baoru Yang, Kaisa M Linderborg, and Riitta Freese.
    They are variously affiliated with the Clinic of Gastroenterology; the Division of Nutrition, Department of Food and Environmental Sciences; the Medical Faculty, Pharmacology, Medical Nutrition Physiology, University of Helsinki in Helsinki, Finland; the University of Helsinki and Helsinki University, Hospital Jorvi in Espoo, Finland; with the Food Chemistry and Food Development, Department of Biochemistry, University of Turku inTurku, Finland; and with the Fazer Group/ Fazer Bakeries Ltd in Vantaa, Finland.
    The team wanted to see if rye bread low in FODMAPs would cause reduced hydrogen excretion, lower intraluminal pressure, higher colonic pH, improved transit times, and fewer IBS symptoms than regular rye bread. 
    To do so, they conducted a randomized, double-blind, controlled cross-over meal study. For that study, seven female IBS patients ate study breads at three consecutive meals during one day. The diet was similar for both study periods except for the FODMAP content of the bread consumed during the study day.
    The team used SmartPill, an indigestible motility capsule, to measure intraluminal pH, transit time, and pressure. Their data showed that low-FODMAP rye bread reduced colonic fermentation compared with regular rye bread. They found no differences in pH, pressure, or transit times between the breads. They also found no difference between the two in terms of conditions in the gastrointestinal tract.
    They did note that the gastric residence of SmartPill was slower than expected. SmartPill left the stomach in less than 5 h only once in 14 measurements, and therefore did not follow on par with the rye bread bolus.
    There's been a great deal of interest in FODMAPs and their potential connection to celiac disease and gluten-intolerance. Stay tuned for more information on the role of FODMAPs in celiac disease and/or irritable bowel syndrome.
    Source:
    World J Gastroenterol. 2018 Mar 21; 24(11): 1259–1268.doi:  10.3748/wjg.v24.i11.1259

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/22/2018 - Proteins are the building blocks of life. If scientists can figure out how to create and grow new proteins, they can create new treatments and cures to a multitude of medical, biological and even environmental conditions.
    For a couple of decades now, scientists have been searching for a biological Rosetta stone that would allow them to engineer proteins with precision, but the problem has remained dauntingly complex.  Researchers had a pretty good understanding of the very simple way that the linear chemical code carried by strands of DNA translates into strings of amino acids in proteins. 
    But, one of the main problems in protein engineering has to do with the way proteins fold into their various three-dimensional structures. Until recently, no one has been able to decipher the rules that will predict how proteins fold into those three-dimensional structures.  So even if researchers were somehow able to design a protein with the right shape for a given job, they wouldn’t know how to go about making it from protein’s building blocks, the amino acids.
    But now, scientists like William DeGrado, a chemist at the University of California, San Francisco, and David Baker, director for the Institute for Protein Design at the University of Washington, say that designing proteins will become at least as important as manipulating DNA has been in the past couple of decades.
    After making slow, but incremental progress over the years, scientists have improved their ability to decipher the complex language of protein shapes. Among other things, they’ve gained a better understanding of how then the laws of physics cause the proteins to snap into folded origami-like structures based on the ways amino acids are attracted or repelled by others many places down the chain.
    It is this new ability to decipher the complex language of protein shapes that has fueled their progress. UCSF’s DeGrado is using these new breakthroughs to search for new medicines that will be more stable, both on the shelf and in the body. He is also looking for new ways to treat Alzheimer’s disease and similar neurological conditions, which result when brain proteins fold incorrectly and create toxic deposits.
    Meanwhile, Baker’s is working on a single vaccine that would protect against all strains of the influenza virus, along with a method for breaking down the gluten proteins in wheat, which could help to generate new treatments for people with celiac disease. 
    With new computing power, look for progress on the understanding, design, and construction of brain proteins. As understanding, design and construction improve, look for brain proteins to play a major role in disease research and treatment. This is all great news for people looking to improve our understanding and treatment of celiac disease.
    Source:
    Bloomberg.com