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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/07/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    HOW TO GET YOUR TODDLER TO SAY YES TO GLUTEN FREE


    Zyana Morris

    Celiac.com 04/27/2016 - Parents who want to give a gluten-free diet to their toddlers can face difficulties. It can be tricky when it comes to balancing the vitamins, minerals, and calories your child needs to thrive. Young kids who are used to other foods can become picky eaters as well. Parents have to look for foods which taste good, are healthy, and are interesting enough to overcome objections to the new diet.


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    Photo: pixabay.comIt's very important to consult with your child's doctor, nutritionists, available networks, and other experts, like Danna Korn, founder of R.O.C.K. (Raising Our Celiac Kids). Find people who have walked a similar path and can guide you to the best possible gluten-free diet for your children.

    Gluten-free food ideas for toddlers

    • Naturally mushy foods like fresh fruits and vegetables (ex. bananas, avocadoes, cooked sweet potatoes and mashed potatoes).
    • You can start the day by making a smoothie; using frozen fruits like oranges, strawberries, bananas, honey and gluten-free yogurt. Smoothies are a great place to hide needed supplements, and you can easily adjust the ingredients to suit the taste and nutritional needs of your toddlers.
    • Cream of rice can be another option for breakfast. You can add raisins, nuts, dried and frozen fruits and serve it with honey, fruit syrup, or brown sugar.
    • Making and eating apple sauce can be fun as well. Just cook peeled, cored apples in a sauce pan with some water and cook them until they are mushy. For extra sweetness, mash these apples, add brown sugar or drip some maple syrup before serving. You may even sprinkle some cinnamon or nutmeg for some nice flavor. Use other fruits like pears, apricots and peaches to make other sauces.
    • Eggs can be served in different forms. For example; scrambled, boiled, poached, deviled, fried, or even make egg salad.
    • Some of the vegetables can be added to the gluten-free menu as well. You can try making muffins using pumpkins or carrots. To give them a better form and shape, you can even use mini-muffin pans.
    • A home prepared macaroni and cheese can be very tasty and attractive to toddlers who consume dairy products. Make sure you're preparing it completely at home so it has controlled an amount of salt and other ingredients.
    • Consider sandwiches on gluten-free bread with fillings like egg salad, grilled cheese, or fresh lettuce. One of the most popular accompaniments of sandwiches is tomato soup: an easy side to whip up for dipping and sipping.
    • One of the all time favorites is rice pudding. If your toddler has a cow's milk allergy you can use rice milk or coconut milk.

    The most important thing is to make sure that the diet you are giving to your toddler is safe, nutritionally appropriate, and uses ingredients that are easily available. Having the advice of your toddler's doctor and nutritionist is key.

    It's not impossible and it does get easier with time. Like any life adjustment the beginning is the roughest. If you have an early diagnosis though, and you make it through the toddler years, you will be well on your way to making healthy, life-saving, choices for your child for years to come. 


    Image Caption: Photo: pixabay.com
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  • Related Articles

    Danna Korn
    This article originally appeared in the Autumn 2005 edition of Celiac.com's Journal of Gluten-Sensitivity.
    You’ve all heard the joke proclaiming that “denial is not a river in Egypt.”  No, it’s not.  What it is, though, is a very real issue for many, if not most people who have been diagnosed with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity.  There are a couple of types of denial—the first type affects us—while the other type affects those around us.
    When We’re in Denial
    Many people who are diagnosed—or when their kids are—go through some type of denial.  It usually occurs at a few key times after diagnosis—and for a few different reasons, here are some examples:

    Immediate denial—the diagnosis isn’t right.  Nope.  Couldn’t be.  I don’t know anyone who has that.  I don’t even know what gluten is.  I’ve never heard of celiac disease.  I don’t have symptoms…my symptoms are mild.  It’s just lactose intolerance, I’m sure.  I don’t have diarrhea, so I couldn’t have that.  I’m overweight, and all celiacs are skinny.  My results were inconclusive.  Someone must have made a mistake.  All of these thoughts can be symptoms of denial. A few weeks into the diet—I don’t think that diagnosis was right.  This is when the reality of doing this for the rest of your life sets in.  One angel (the good one, of course) sits on one shoulder whispering, “You know you need to stay gluten-free—keep it up—you can do it! Mmmm, yummy cheese on this gluten-free toast.  The other shoulder is home to the Devil-in-Denial: “No way are you going to another happy hour and order wine and celery sticks while all the other guys are drinkin’ beer and deep-fried stuff.  You don’t have no stinkin’ intolerance.  Come on—just one beer...and one piece of pizza.  It won’t hurtcha.  No stinkin’ intolerance…”  This is really just a period of ambivalence, hoping beyond hope that you don’t really have this condition, choosing to lean toward believing you don’t. Danger zone:  I never had that.  The most dangerous type of denial occurs several months into the diet, when all of a sudden you realize you feel so good that you don’t even remember the last time you felt bad.  That’s when people often think, “I knew I just needed a little bit of time to get over that bug I had!  I feel great.  I’ll bet I never even had anything wrong with me.”
    When Others are in Denial
    Then there’s the type of denial that our family members and loved ones express.  Ask anyone who is gluten intolerant or has been diagnosed with celiac disease if they have relatives who won’t be tested, and chances are, you’ll get a surprised look as though you just guessed what color of underwear they’re wearing, and a “yeah, how did you know?”  Because we all have them.  Well, most of us do.  Why is it so hard for our relatives to believe they might have this?  It is, after all, one of the most common genetic diseases one can have—and it does run in the family.  Yet we’ve all heard comments like:
    No, I don’t have that (blunt, bold, and full-on denial). I don’t think I need to be tested (oh, really, and that would be because….?!?) I was tested once, and the tests were negative (remember, once-negative does not mean always negative—also remember there are false negatives). I was tested, and my results were inconclusive, so I don’t think I have it (inconclusive may be a euphemism for mildly positive). I don’t have any symptoms (oh, really?  There are about 250 symptoms, and you have NONE?) My symptoms really aren’t that severe; I can live with them (so you’ll just wait till you’re really sick and doing long-term damage to start trying to improve your health?). I couldn’t do the diet anyway, so I’m not going to bother being tested (now there’s a rational argument for you).
    Bottom line is they don’t want to have celiac disease, or they don’t want to give up gluten.  Some of your relatives may even refuse to believe you have it.  I’ve met many people with celiac disease who have been accused of being hypochondriacs or neurotic.The problem with denial is that it justifies eating gluten.  When you have this epiphany “realizing” that you don’t have celiac disease or don’t need to be gluten-free, it’s tempting to run, not walk, to the nearest Krispy Kreme outlet.
    Resist the temptation.  If you’ve been on the diet for awhile, then yes, you feel great, but it’s because you’re not eating wheat or gluten, not in spite of it.  The danger in testing the waters is that you may not have any reaction when you do, and then you’re likely to jump to the obvious (by which I mean “desired”) conclusion and confirmation that you never needed to eliminate wheat or gluten in the first place.
    If you still wonder whether or not you have a medical reason for cutting gluten from your diet, here are a few things you can do to help solidify things in your mind:

    Get properly tested. Get a second (or third) opinion. Talk to other people who have been diagnosed with the same condition about your symptoms and your feelings of denial (chances are they’ll grin and say, “Yep, I felt that way at one point, too”). Write it down: List your symptoms, the symptoms of the condition, and how you feel if you’ve been following the diet.  Sometimes seeing it in writing is the just the proof you need.
    Denial, by the way, is one of the most compelling arguments in support of proper testing and diagnosis.  If you’ve been confirmed with a diagnosis, you may be tempted to fall into a state of denial, but it’s going to seem pretty silly, even to you.But also keep in mind that if you’ve been tested and your results were inconclusive or negative, you may need to consider re-testing or other alternatives.  The tests have changed over the years, and maybe your tests were done long ago.  There are also false negatives; and you can be triggered at any point in your life, so just because you were negative once doesn’t mean you’ll be negative again.  And finally, there are people who are negative on all of the tests, yet their health improves dramatically on a gluten-free diet.  Go figure.
    Remember, if it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it’s most likely a duck, even if you wish it were a pigeon.


    Danna Korn
    This article originally appeared in the Winter 2004 edition of Celiac.com's Journal of Gluten-Sensitivity.
    Celiac.com 10/04/2010 - When Tyler was diagnosed with celiac disease at the age of 18 months, I wanted desperately to talk to a kid––one who could talk––about what it’s like to have celiac disease.  Do you feel jipped?  Does it make you sad?  Do you feel “different” from the other kids?!?  I was heartbroken––grief-stricken––I had a long way to go before I would evolve into the cheerleader I hope I’ve become in helping people live––and love––the gluten-free lifestyle.
    Oh, sure, friends and family told me “it would be okay,” the way friends and family do in tough situations.  But I felt they were just placating me––after all, what did they know?  They hadn’t even heard of celiac disease before I had explained the diagnosis.  And to be honest, I didn’t care much at that time about what adults thought of the situation––I wanted desperately to hear from a kid: “Look at me––I turned out just fine!”
    That was nearly 13 years ago, and there weren’t any kids who had celiac disease––none that I knew of, anyway.  So we blazed our own trail, working hard to approach our unique challenges with optimism each and every step of the way.
    Recently, I was reminded of the way I felt when Tyler was first diagnosed, when a woman with tears in her eyes approached me after one of my talks.  “I know you talk about how we can all learn to live and love this lifestyle, and I appreciate your suggestions for raising happy, healthy, gluten-free kids––but,” she seemed shy and embarrassed to continue, looking at the floor as she asked, “would you mind if I talked directly to Tyler?”
    But of course!  How could I have forgotten?  That need to talk to a child who had been through it was so compelling at first––and now Tyler could talk!  Sure you can, was my automatic reply, knowing that my 14 (and-a-half) year-old-I-at-least-like-to-pretend-that-everything-you-do-annoys-me son would be less than thrilled to take the call. 
    I would love for Tyler to write an article telling you how celiac disease is no big deal in his life.  He did so a few years ago for my first book, “Kids with Celiac Disease,” when he wrote Chapter One:  “What it’s like to be a kid with celiac disease,” but that was when he was only ten.  That was before he turned into a teenager and had to start pretending not to want to do the things we ask him to do.
    The truth is that this has never been a big deal for Tyler.  We gave him control of his diet from day one, which I believe is crucial.  We have always maintained an optimistic, yet realistic approach, with Tyler and his non-celiac but oh-so-supportive sister Kelsie, her being our guiding light in terms of inspiration and positive attitude.
    One day, a few months after he had been interviewed on a local TV station, Tyler was approached by a woman who attended one of our R.O.C.K. (Raising Our Celiac Kids) parties.  I watched with curiosity and felt somewhat protective and guarded as this woman I didn’t know quickly approached him and took one of his hands in both of hers in what seemed to be an affectionate gesture.  “Tyler, you have changed my life,” she said boldly.  Then 13 years old, he did what most 13-year-old boys might do, and said nothing––shooting an anxious glance my way, looking for guidance, but I was as bewildered as him.  She began to get tears in her eyes as she continued.  “I’m 65 years old.  Three months ago, I was as sick as I could be.  I had been to dozens of doctors, and had a list of symptoms a mile long.  Everyone thought I was crazy––I even had to quit my job, because I was so sick.  I truly wanted to die.  Then I saw you on TV talking about celiac disease.  I insisted on being tested, and was positive for celiac disease.  I’ve been gluten-free ever since, and feel absolutely wonderful.”  With that, she gave him a bear hug, and he shot me a glance that I couldn’t read. 
    I’ve learned not to embarrass my kids (well, sometimes I do it intentionally, but that’s another story), so I said nothing, and Tyler went about his business.  Several minutes later, Tyler approached me with a beaming smile.  “Mom, now I know why you do this!  It feels really good to help other people!” 
    He has since decided that he’s blessed to have celiac disease, because it has provided him with an opportunity to reach out and help others––an act that even at his young age he realizes is as satisfying for him as it is for those he helps.  Quite a perspective for a teenage boy, if I may brag about him a little!
    So while I would love for Tyler to write an article about this, those of you who have teenagers understand that it would be easier to teach my dog quantum physics than to have him sit down and write an article––so you’ll have to take my word for it.  Thankfully, at this point, Tyler is a happy, healthy, gluten-free young man who thinks a lot more about baseball and his friends than he does about the restrictions of his diet.  Other kids, teens, and young men and women I’ve met over the years have been equally optimistic and inspiring.  So rest easy, parents––your kids will, in fact, be just fine…and I really do know this!


    Danna Korn
    This article originally appeared in the Autumn 2003 edition of Celiac.com's Journal of Gluten-Sensitivity.
    Celiac.com 11/19/2010 - “To talk to someone who does not listen is enough to tense the devil.” – Pearl Bailey
    No matter what your reason for your dietary restriction, one of the hardest things about this diet is talking to people about why you must be gluten-free, and trying to explain the diet itself.  Responses range from complete understanding (sorry, this is extremely rare), to people who think they understand but don’t (“Oh, this is just like when I gave up liver for Lent!”), to those who don’t care an iota about your diet, to the other 95 percent of the population who really want to understand, but just don’t get it.
    There is an art to talking to people about your condition and the diet, but first there are a few basic ground rules you should know and follow.
    Attitudes Are Contagious
    When you’re talking with other people about your diet, especially close family members who will be “in this” with you for the rest of your life and who may also someday learn they must go gluten-free, remember that attitudes are contagious.  If you give the impression that this diagnosis has ruined your life, and that the diet is worse than astronaut food, others will feel that way, too.
    First, these things aren’t true, even if it seems that way at first.  Second, you don’t want your husband, wife, or kids to feel this way, especially if they’re the ones on the diet.  Be careful what you say. Even when they appear to be tuned out, kids and spouses hear what you’re saying.  Feelings can be hurt, and lasting impressions can be made.  Portray a positive attitude about the diet if you can; you may even find it rubs off on yourself.
    Everyone’s a Doctor
    Before you begin talking to people about your medical condition, you should know that nearly everyone, regardless of education (or lack thereof), is a doctor.  Especially when it comes to gastrointestinal distress, a subject that nearly everyone on the planet is at least vaguely familiar with.
    Once you get past the squeamish introduction, you’re likely to be cut off by people who want to tell you what you have.  “It’s lactose intolerance,” your best friend assures you.  “No, I think you have all the warning signs of colon cancer,” argues Doctor Dad.  “You just need acupuncture in your butt,” advises your eight-year-old wanna-be doctor son who just learned the word (acupuncture, not butt).
    You may have trouble getting everyone to stop with the advice and listen, but try to get through your dissertation.  Then you can look forward to one of several responses (percentages are based on personal experience, not scientific findings):

    Complete understanding (0.1%):  These people will listen intently as you discuss villi, bowel movements, gluten, and modified food starch, barely moving a muscle as they hang on your every word, taking careful notes so as not to poison you at your next get-together.  These saints have also been known to hang flyers in their kitchens, listing safe and forbidden foods in case you drop by for an unexpected visit.  Worship the ground these people walk on, because they’re few and far between. Pseudo-understanding (they think they get it but they don’t) (0.9%): These people are easily identifiable, because they nod much too quickly when you explain the situation to them.  Staccato-type nodding of the head is usually accompanied by rapid-fire successive affirmative phrases such as, “Uh-huh, sure, mm-hmm, yep, gotcha, sure, yep, of course, mm-hmm.”  Don’t burst their bubble; these people are used to knowing everything, and usually can’t be told otherwise.  I recommend that you bring your own food to get-togethers with these people. Absolute and unveiled lack of interest and concern (4.0%): Gotta hand it to ’em, these folks are honest.  Don’t try to push a rope. Desire is there, but they just don’t get it (95.0%): These people mean well, but either don’t have the ability or don’t want to take the time to understand.  Don’t be annoyed, offended, or otherwise put off.  Their attitude can’t change the fact that you feel a lot better now that you’ve eliminated wheat or gluten, and that’s what really counts.  Don’t disown them (especially because most of your friends and family will fall into this category), and don’t berate them, either.  Your diet isn’t their concern, even if you think they should care more than they appear to.
    When Those Closest to You Just Don’t Get It
    Obviously, dealing with this last (and vast) category is difficult.  Already you’re saddled with the extra responsibilities and challenges inherent to the diet, and it may not sit well with you that some of the people closest to you are those who put forth the least effort to understand.  We expect family and friends to support us, show concern, offer assistance, and make things that are important to us important to them, yet often it is exactly those people who disappoint us the most.In this situation, we have the additional challenge of dealing with the fact that we’re around them frequently, and food is often a part of social situations.  Trusting them to provide foods that are safe, or worse yet, dealing with the anger and resentment when they don’t even bother, can test the most solid of relationships.
    If they just don’t get it because they’re simply not capable, forgive them and move on. Some people are set in their ways, and others are intellectually incapable of grasping the intricacies of the diet.  Be aware and be prepared with your own foods when getting together.
    When loved ones are capable but just don’t want to bother taking the time to learn about the diet and your condition, you may experience feelings of hostility and resentment.  It’s okay to be mad, but don’t wallow in the anger; it serves no purpose, and will provide you no benefit, because they’re not going to change, and you can’t force them to want to care.
    It’s important to avoid falling into the role of the victim.  You may have some serious medical conditions, and you could be getting some sort of reinforcement from feeling victimized, both by the condition and the people around you.  It gets you nowhere, except into a rut of negativity.
    People who just don’t get it aren’t going to suddenly show interest in you, your condition, and the diet. Just as they don’t have to cater to your diet, you don’t need to cater to their insensitivity and thoughtlessness.  Forgive them for their lack of sensitivity, their narcissism, and their indifference (but unless you want to start a family feud, do it in your heart rather than out loud), and move on.  They may be sensitive, generous, caring people in many ways, or maybe they’re not.  In either case, you can’t force them to care or learn about your condition or diet, and as frustrating as it can be, your only choice is to accept that fact.  Don’t allow yourself to get mired in the negativity that their apathy can create, and don’t lower yourself to their level either by caring less about their situations.
    Need-to-Know Rating Criteria
    HIGH: Will these people prepare food for me?  If so, it’s important for them to understand which foods and ingredients are safe and which are forbidden.  If you can narrow it down for them, do so.  For instance, don’t go to a restaurant and ask them what they have that’s wheat or gluten-free and expect to get a good answer.  Instead, peruse the menu, and figure out what looks as though it is safe, or could be made wheat or gluten-free.  Then you can get into the intricacies of cooking procedures, contamination issues, and ingredients.
    Sometimes it’s easiest to explain your condition in terms of an allergy, even if your condition is celiac disease (which is not an allergy).  People understand, for instance, that peanut allergies can be severe, and even a little peanut can cause some people to have a serious reaction.  Sometimes it’s necessary to explain that you have a “severe toxic reaction” to wheat or gluten before people will take your condition seriously.  Otherwise, they may think that it’s okay just to pluck the croutons off the salad after the fact.
    MEDIUM: Are they asking out of curiosity or nosiness?  Most people who ask about your diet do so out of genuine curiosity rather than abject obnoxiousness.  Maybe they have dietary restrictions of their own, and wonder if yours are the same as theirs.  Maybe they’re nutritionists, or maybe they’re just genuinely curious.  In any case, don’t be offended, but don’t feel as though you have to give a dissertation on the advantages of a wheat or gluten-free diet either.  Offer as much information as you’re comfortable giving, and as much as it looks like they’re truly interested in hearing.
    A good response is usually generic at first, adding information as the listeners seem to want it.  “I have a condition that makes me unable to tolerate gluten, so I eat a gluten-free diet” is usually a good start. If they want to know more, they’ll ask.
    LOW: Do they warrant a response?  When the 16-year-old kid wearing a paper cap and taking your order at the drive-up window asks with a strong Valley Girl accent, “Like, what’s wrong with the bun, dude? How come you ordered, like, all your burgers without, like, the bun?” your best response is to bite your tongue.  No response is needed, unless you can muster a good, “Like, what-EVER, dude, I like ’em that way.”


  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/23/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to learn whether celiac disease patients commonly suffer cognitive impairment at the time they are diagnosed, and to compare their cognitive performance with non-celiac subjects with similar chronic symptoms and to a group of healthy control subjects.
    The research team included G Longarini, P Richly, MP Temprano, AF Costa, H Vázquez, ML Moreno, S Niveloni, P López, E Smecuol, R Mazure, A González, E Mauriño, and JC Bai. They are variously associated with the Small Bowel Section, Department of Medicine, Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo Gastroenterology Hospital; Neurocience Cognitive and Traslational Institute (INECO), Favaloro Fundation, CONICET, Buenos Aires; the Brain Health Center (CESAL), Quilmes, Argentina; the Research Council, MSAL, CABA; and with the Research Institute, School of Medicine, Universidad del Salvador.
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    Celiac disease patients had similar cognitive performance and anxiety, but no significant differences in depression scores compared with disease controls.
    A total of thirty-three subjects were diagnosed with celiac disease. Compared with the 26 healthy control subjects, the 17 celiac disease subjects, and the 17 disease control subjects, who mostly had irritable bowel syndrome, showed impaired cognitive performance (P=0.02 and P=0.04, respectively), functional impairment (P<0.01), and higher depression (P<0.01). 
    From their data, the team noted that any abnormal cognitive functions they saw in adults with newly diagnosed celiac disease did not seem not to be a result of the disease itself. 
    Their results indicate that cognitive dysfunction in celiac patients could be related to long-term symptoms from chronic disease, in general.
    Source:
    J Clin Gastroenterol. 2018 Mar 1. doi: 10.1097/MCG.0000000000001018.

    Connie Sarros
    Celiac.com 04/21/2018 - Dear Friends and Readers,
    I have been writing articles for Scott Adams since the 2002 Summer Issue of the Scott-Free Press. The Scott-Free Press evolved into the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. I felt honored when Scott asked me ten years ago to contribute to his quarterly journal and it's been a privilege to write articles for his publication ever since.
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    My following books will still be available at Amazon.com:
    Gluten-free Cooking for Dummies Student's Vegetarian Cookbook for Dummies Wheat-free Gluten-free Dessert Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Reduced Calorie Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Cookbook for Kids and Busy Adults (revised version) My first book was published in 1996. My journey since then has been incredible. I have met so many in the celiac community and I feel blessed to be able to call you friends. Many of you have told me that I helped to change your life – let me assure you that your kind words, your phone calls, your thoughtful notes, and your feedback throughout the years have had a vital impact on my life, too. Thank you for all of your support through these years.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/20/2018 - A digital media company and a label data company are teaming up to help major manufacturers target, reach and convert their desired shoppers based on dietary needs, such as gluten-free diet. The deal could bring synergy in emerging markets such as the gluten-free and allergen-free markets, which represent major growth sectors in the global food industry. 
    Under the deal, personalized digital media company Catalina will be joining forces with Label Insight. Catalina uses consumer purchases data to target shoppers on a personal base, while Label Insight works with major companies like Kellogg, Betty Crocker, and Pepsi to provide insight on food label data to government, retailers, manufacturers and app developers.
    "Brands with very specific product benefits, gluten-free for example, require precise targeting to efficiently reach and convert their desired shoppers,” says Todd Morris, President of Catalina's Go-to-Market organization, adding that “Catalina offers the only purchase-based targeting solution with this capability.” 
    Label Insight’s clients include food and beverage giants such as Unilever, Ben & Jerry's, Lipton and Hellman’s. Label Insight technology has helped the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) build the sector’s very first scientifically accurate database of food ingredients, health attributes and claims.
    Morris says the joint partnership will allow Catalina to “enhance our dataset and further increase our ability to target shoppers who are currently buying - or have shown intent to buy - in these emerging categories,” including gluten-free, allergen-free, and other free-from foods.
    The deal will likely make for easier, more precise targeting of goods to consumers, and thus provide benefits for manufacturers and retailers looking to better serve their retail food customers, especially in specialty areas like gluten-free and allergen-free foods.
    Source:
    fdfworld.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/19/2018 - Previous genome and linkage studies indicate the existence of a new disease triggering mechanism that involves amino acid metabolism and nutrient sensing signaling pathways. In an effort to determine if amino acids might play a role in the development of celiac disease, a team of researchers recently set out to investigate if plasma amino acid levels differed among children with celiac disease compared with a control group.
     
    The research team included Åsa Torinsson Naluai, Ladan Saadat Vafa, Audur H. Gudjonsdottir, Henrik Arnell, Lars Browaldh, and Daniel Agardh. They are variously affiliated with the Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Karolinska University Hospital and Division of Pediatrics, CLINTEC, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institute, Sodersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Diabetes & Celiac Disease Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; and with the Nathan S Kline Institute in the U.S.A.
    First, the team used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS) to analyze amino acid levels in fasting plasma samples from 141 children with celiac disease and 129 non-celiac disease controls. They then crafted a general linear model using age and experimental effects as covariates to compare amino acid levels between children with celiac disease and non-celiac control subjects.
    Compared with the control group, seven out of twenty-three children with celiac disease showed elevated levels of the the following amino acids: tryptophan; taurine; glutamic acid; proline; ornithine; alanine; and methionine.
    The significance of the individual amino acids do not survive multiple correction, however, multivariate analyses of the amino acid profile showed significantly altered amino acid levels in children with celiac disease overall and after correction for age, sex and experimental effects.
    This study shows that amino acids can influence inflammation and may play a role in the development of celiac disease.
    Source:
    PLoS One. 2018; 13(3): e0193764. doi: & 10.1371/journal.pone.0193764

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/18/2018 - To the relief of many bewildered passengers and crew, no more comfort turkeys, geese, possums or other questionable pets will be flying on Delta or United without meeting the airlines' strict new requirements for service animals.
    If you’ve flown anywhere lately, you may have seen them. People flying with their designated “emotional support” animals. We’re not talking genuine service animals, like seeing eye dogs, or hearing ear dogs, or even the Belgian Malinois that alerts its owner when there is gluten in food that may trigger her celiac disease.
    Now, to be honest, some of those animals in question do perform a genuine service for those who need emotional support dogs, like veterans with PTSD.
    However, many of these animals are not service animals at all. Many of these animals perform no actual service to their owners, and are nothing more than thinly disguised pets. Many lack proper training, and some have caused serious problems for the airlines and for other passengers.
    Now the major airlines are taking note and introducing stringent requirements for service animals.
    Delta was the first to strike. As reported by the New York Times on January 19: “Effective March 1, Delta, the second largest US airline by passenger traffic, said it will require passengers seeking to fly with pets to present additional documents outlining the passenger’s need for the animal and proof of its training and vaccinations, 48 hours prior to the flight.… This comes in response to what the carrier said was a 150 percent increase in service and support animals — pets, often dogs, that accompany people with disabilities — carried onboard since 2015.… Delta said that it flies some 700 service animals a day. Among them, customers have attempted to fly with comfort turkeys, gliding possums, snakes, spiders, and other unusual pets.”
    Fresh from an unsavory incident with an “emotional support” peacock incident, United Airlines has followed Delta’s lead and set stricter rules for emotional support animals. United’s rules also took effect March 1, 2018.
    So, to the relief of many bewildered passengers and crew, no more comfort turkeys, geese, possums or other questionable pets will be flying on Delta or United without meeting the airlines' strict new requirements for service and emotional support animals.
    Source:
    cnbc.com