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    In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease. In 1998 I founded The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore!, and I am the co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    Scand J Gastroenterol 2000 Sep;35(9):947-9
    Lohiniemi S, Maki M, Kaukinen K, Laippala P, Collin P.
    Dept. of Medicine, Tampere University Hospital, University of Tampere, Finland.
    SPECIAL NOTE: European Codex Alimentarius quality wheat starch was used in this study.
    (Celiac.com 06/25/2000)
    BACKGROUND: A wheat starch-based gluten-free diet is widely adopted in the treatment of coeliac disease, even though the products contain trace amounts of gluten. The aim here was to establish whether such a diet sustains abdominal symptoms.
    METHODS: The Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS) was applied to 58 coeliac disease patients on gluten-free diets and 110 non-coeliac controls. An estimate was made of daily dietary fiber and wheat starch-derived gluten. Psychological well-being was evaluated by a structured interview. Twenty-three coeliac patients consented to small bowel biopsy.
    RESULTS: The mean GSRS score in coeliac disease patients did not differ from that in control subjects. Poorer psychological well-being was associated with abdominal symptoms in coeliac patients, whereas the daily amount of wheat starch had no effect on GSRS score. Overall dietary compliance was good, and villous atrophy was found in only 2 out of 23 patients. The average fiber consumption, 13 g per day, was lower than recommended.
    CONCLUSIONS: Wheat starch-based gluten-free products are well-tolerated in coeliac disease patients, provided that their diets are otherwise strict.
     

    Scott Adams
    Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics
    Volume 17 Issue 4 Page 587 - February 2003
    Aliment Pharmacol Ther 2003 Feb;17(4):587-94
    Peraaho M, Kaukinen K, Paasikivi K, Sievanen H, Lohiniemi S, Maki M, Collin P.
    Departments of Medicine and Pediatrics, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere (also Medical School, University of Tampere), Bone Research Group, UKK Institute, Tampere, and Finnish Coeliac Society, Tampere, Finland.
    Celiac.com 3/14/2003 - BACKGROUND: : The safety of wheat-starch-based gluten-free products in the treatment of coeliac disease is debatable. Prospective studies are lacking. AIM: : To compare the clinical, histological and serological response to a wheat-starch-based or natural gluten-free diet in patients with newly detected coeliac disease.
    METHODS: : Fifty-seven consecutive adults with untreated coeliac disease were randomized to a wheat-starch-based or natural gluten-free diet. Clinical response, small bowel mucosal morphology, CD3+, alphabeta+ and gammadelta+ intraepithelial lymphocytes, mucosal human leucocyte antigen-DR expression and serum endomysial, transglutaminase and gliadin antibodies were investigated before and 12 months after the introduction of the gluten-free diet. Quality of life measurements were performed by standardized questionnaires and the bone mineral density was analyzed.
    RESULTS: : In both groups, abdominal symptoms were alleviated equally by a strict diet. There were no differences between the groups in mucosal morphology, the density of intra-epithelial lymphocytes, serum antibodies, bone mineral density or quality of life tests at the end of the study. Four patients on a natural gluten-free diet and two on a wheat-starch-based gluten-free diet had dietary lapses; as a result, inadequate mucosal, serological and clinical recovery was observed.
    CONCLUSIONS: : The dietary response to a wheat-starch-based gluten-free diet was as good as that to a natural gluten-free diet in patients with newly detected coeliac disease.
    PMID: 12622768

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    Did you actually get a complete celiac panel?   https://www.verywellhealth.com/celiac-disease-blood-tests-562694 Doing allergy testing (IgG) is well sort of helpful, but not very accurate per all the leading allergy groups.  You can google that.    
    Thank you so much.  No doctor would refer me to a gastro doctor, so I made an appointment myself without referral.  I took all my copies of bloodworkwith me and begged for help.  I explained my situation. He was one of the best in my town.  I was told to throw all my integrative tests in the trash and to gain 20 pounds and I would feel better.  At the time I was my normal thin self.  He said my bloodwork looked good and I was not a risk factor.  I may try to see another specialist and see if any
    Yes, celiac runs in families. You can have testing done to see if you carry the chromosomes that predispose you to it. There are many folks who have the chromosomes who never develop celiac, but it is my understanding that if you don’t have those chromosomes then you probably don’t have celiac.... with the caveat that they are finding more genetic markers as time progresses. If your brother has celiac, you are at risk, but not guaranteed to develop celiac disease. All celiacs have to be ext
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