• Join our community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

  • Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsSubscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

  • Member Statistics

    77,913
    Total Members
    3,093
    Most Online
    Richardmc
    Newest Member
    Richardmc
    Joined
  • 0

    Brewers Get Exemption From Allergy Label Rules


    Jefferson Adams
    Image Caption: Photo: CC-jaygoldman

    Celiac.com 04/06/2011 - The Canadian brewing industry caught a break when their products were exempted from new allergy labeling rules that would have required warning labels to declare beer to contain wheat or barley.


    Ads by Google:




    ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW ADS
    Ads by Google:



    Health Minister Leona Aglukkaq introduced new packaging requirements which give brewers a temporary exemption from the regulations. Minister Aglukkaq has said that she will first consult with other countries which have introduced similar labeling rules.

    The decision was at least a temporary victory for the industry, mainly for smaller beer-makers that claimed that the cost of replacing their painted bottles to conform with the new rules would run into the millions of dollars.

    The industry has also taken the position that every beer drinker knows that beer contains wheat or barley.

    “Our intent was never to hold up the entire regulations,” said André Fortin, a spokesman for the Brewers Association of Canada, said the industry group was "pleased with the decision to take into account the particular situation for beer.”

    The beer labels are of particular interest to people suffering from celiac disease, who suffer an auto-immune reaction when exposed the gluten contained in such grains as barley, wheat and rye.

    The last minute agreement to exempt beer from allergy labeling requirements disappointed some. Laurie Harada of Anaphylaxis Canada, which represents people with food allergies, said her group was “very disappointed by the last-minute decision of the government to pull the regulations for the beer.”

    Ms. Harada called on the Canadian government to move quickly make a final decision about beer labels.

    “They can’t give us any idea of the process or the dates right now, so I would still be asking the question: How are you going to deal with this?”

    But Ms. Harada said she is extremely pleased with the bulk of the new regulations. “It will certainly help to protect a number of people,” she said.

    The revised regulations require that manufacturers clearly identify food allergens, gluten sources and sulphites either in the list of ingredients or at the end of the list of ingredients.

    In addition, an allergen or gluten source must be written in commonly used words such as milk or wheat.

    Experts estimate that 5 to 6 per cent of young children and 3 to 4 per cent of adults suffer from food allergies, while nearly 1 per cent of the general population is affected by celiac disease.

    In part because of the complexity of the rule changes, and the shelf life of foods, the new regulations will not be enforced until Aug. 4, 2012.

    0


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    Well, honestly, they're right. It's about as silly as requiring bakeries to warn their customers their bread contains gluten.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest leiloni

    Posted

    I know that it may sound silly but there are people out there who have absolutely no idea that beer contains wheat. I was at a bar with a couple friends and one of them who shall remain nameless had no idea it contained wheat. Can't remember how we got on the subject but me and my boyfriend where shocked!

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

    Guest
    You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Ads by Google:

  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. He has covered Health News for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. His work has appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate, among others.

  • Popular Contributors

  • Ads by Google:

  • Who's Online   2 Members, 0 Anonymous, 312 Guests (See full list)

  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    Celiac.com 01/31/2006 – On Tuesday, January 10, 2006, federal authorities raided French Meadow Bakery in Minneapolis, MN, and seized more that 30,000 loaves of spelt and kamut bread and accused the company of mislabeling it as "wheat-free". According to U.S. Attorney Thomas Heffelfinger spelt and kamut share common proteins with wheat that can be just as dangerous to those who are allergic to wheat. French Meadow Bakery considers both grains to be safe alternatives to wheat, and claims that it has only received a single complaint of an allergic reaction during its 16 years in business. According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration the bakery was given plenty of forewarning, as it was told last April that it needed to change its labels and not use "wheat-free" on any products that contain spelt or kamut—but the bakery failed to comply. Wheat is considered one of the top 10 allergens, and allergies to it can be life threatening—especially to allergic children. According to the new Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act, foods that contain spelt or kamut cannot carry "wheat-free" or "wheat-alternative" labels. Heffelfinger believes that mislabeling it will create a serious health risk for a significant portion of the population.
    French Meadow Bakery has agreed to change its labels and has submitted the revised ones to the Food and Drug Administration for approval, however, on its Web site they have the following statements:
      "In the meantime the packaging changes have become a challenge for us and several other companies as to whether spelt is wheat or is not...We feel it is more important to look at the nutritional and digestive properties since it (spelt) is not a hybrid of what we call wheat today...We are not alone in this, after reviewing our fellow bakers Web sites, (Rudis Bakery and Food for Life) we learned that they too call Spelt a wheat alternative...Our intention has not and is not to risk the health of our valued customers...As an example of this, we state on our White Spelt and Cinnamon Raisin Spelt products a warning: CELIACS NOTE: SPELT CONTAINS GLUTEN."   Celiac.com has also just learned that Purity Foods, a major spelt producer, has applied for an exemption from the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act and in it claim that spelt is not wheat, and that some people who are allergic to wheat can tolerate spelt. However, according to Donald D. Kasarda, Former Research Chemist for the United States Department of Agriculture:
      The scientific name for bread wheat is Triticum aestivum var. Aestivum—the first part of the name defines the genus (Triticum) and the second part, the species (aestivum). Species falling in the genus Triticum are almost certain to be harmful to celiac patients...Some Triticum species of current concern include Triticum aestivum var. spelta (common names include spelt or spelta), Triticum turgidum var. polonicum (common names include Polish wheat, and, recently, Kamut), and Triticum monococcum var. monococcum (common names include einkorn and small spelt). I recommend that celiac patients avoid grain from these species. Also, given their very close relationship to bread and durum wheats, I think it is unlikely that these grains would be safe for those with classical allergic responses to wheat. The companys bread will remain frozen until the case is settled, and Heffelfinger has indicated that none of the products already on food store shelves across the country will be recalled because the bread would likely exhaust its shelf life by the time a recall could be issued. Celiac.com, however, believes that this issue is settled—spelt and kamut are forms of wheat and those with celiac disease and/or wheat allergy should completely avoid them—there are just too many alternative grains out there to take such health risks. We can only hope that Purity Foods application for exemption will be met with strong, scientifically-supported opposition.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/06/2009 - The European Union’s Food Standards Agency (FSA) has issued new rules for foods carrying the ‘gluten-free’ label. Under the new rules, foods labeled ‘gluten-free’ must have less than 20 parts of gluten per million. This new standard represents a ten-fold reduction over the prior rules, which set the gluten limit at 200 parts per million.
    The FSA also established a separate labeling category for cereals that have been specially processed to reduce gluten to levels below 100 parts per million. These foods may not be labeled ‘gluten-free,’ but must carry some other label such as ‘gluten-reduced,’ or ‘very-low gluten.’ The FSA indicates that the exact labeling for such products should be undertaken at the national level.
    Foods that are naturally gluten-free and acceptable for a gluten-free diet cannot be labeled as ‘gluten-free,’ or ‘special-diet,’ but may say that they are ‘naturally gluten-free.’  The rules require the term ‘gluten-free’ or ‘very-low gluten’ to appear prominently on the package label in a way that indicates the “true nature of the food.” These rules are designed to help people with celiac disease make more informed decisions about the gluten content of the food they eat.
    The new rules provide strict definitions for gluten and related grains and proteins, and gluten-free foods, and mandates standards for testing and measuring gluten levels in food.
    They also mandate that quantitative determination of gluten in foods and ingredients be based on an immunologic method or other method providing at least equal sensitivity and specificity, and that all testing done on equipment sensitive to gluten at 10 mg gluten/kg or below.
    The rules cite the Enzyme-linked Immunoassay (ELISA) R5 Mendez method as the officially sanctioned qualitative analysis method for determining gluten presence in food.
    European food makers can voluntarily adopt the new labeling system any time. Compliance becomes mandatory for all EU food makers on Jan. 1, 2012. Regarding the three-year delay, the FSA cited a need on the part of some manufacturers for time to make formulation and packaging changes.
    * Sources: Food Standards Agency: New rules for 'gluten free' foods



    Carissa Bell
    Celiac.com 10/24/2013 - I recently attended the FDA'S Gluten-Free Food Labeling Act seminar and I wanted to share with you what I learned.  
    The FDA’s gluten-free labeling rule is not mandatory, meaning manufacturers are not required to call out “gluten” in food products.  While the regulation is voluntary, what’s important to know is that any product that is labeled gluten-free must meet certain FDA requirements.  To simplify, a packaged food product regulated by the FDA that is labeled gluten-free must contain less than 20 parts per million (ppm) gluten, but it must also comply with additional criteria beyond this specific threshold.  20 ppm is not  based on serving size either, which is key to remember. 
    The use of a “gluten-free” label does not replace the need to comply with the mandatory allergen labeling that requires wheat and the other top allergens to be listed.  As much as most of us would like, there is currently no way to guarantee “zero gluten.” Current validated testing methods cannot test to that level.  Food products that are labeled “no gluten,” “free of gluten,” and “without gluten” must also comply with the FDA’s gluten-free ruling. The claims “made no with no gluten-containing ingredients” and “not made with gluten-containing ingredients” do not have to comply with the ruling. 
    The regulation will allow inherently gluten-free foods, such as a bag of raw carrots or bottle water, to be labeled gluten-free. Here’s an example: While there can still be the case where one package of fresh broccoli may be labeled gluten-free while another may not be, both are still safe for people with celiac disease because broccoli in its natural state is gluten-free.  Oats are not considered a gluten-containing grain, but they may come into contact with wheat by cross contamination.  You should only eat flours that are labeled gluten-free.  The FDA does not have the authority to regulate gluten-free claims. 
    Restaurants serving gluten-free food must do everything in their power to keep food gluten-free if they are making this claim.  Foods labeled by the USDA are not covered by the FDA labeling act.  Also, beverages regulated by TTB are not covered by the FDA'S labeling either.  The most startling thing that I learned is that it is not unusual for a manufacturer to use barley and still label the product gluten-free.  The bottom line is that even if the product is labeled gluten-free, read every ingredient and read it twice just to make sure you're safe!

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/18/2014 - Confusion over the labeling of gluten-free beers just got a bit clearer, thanks to new guidelines by the The Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB). The new guidelines clarify the use of the term “gluten-free” in labeling for alcohol products.
    The Bureau announced that it would continue to consider gluten-free claims to be “misleading” if they were used to describe products made from gluten containing grains.
    Products in which gluten has been removed or reduced to below 20 ppm may be labeled as “processed,” “treated,” or “crafted to remove gluten,” if the claim is made “with a qualifying statement that warns the consumer that the gluten content of the product cannot be determined and that the product may contain gluten,” according to the guidelines.
    These guidelines are consistent with regulations set forth by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in August, which also ruled that alcoholic beverages made from ingredients that do not contain any gluten – such as wines fermented from fruit and spirits distilled from non-grain materials – may continue to be labeled as gluten-free.
    Craft Brew Alliance (CBA), the Portland, Ore.-based maker of Omission Beer, brewed with traditionally malted ingredients and then treated to reduce the gluten content in the finished product, issued a statement that the “TTB announcement regarding gluten-free labeling does not require changes in the way Omission Beer is labeled, or any other aspect of the production and sale of our beers.”
    Source:
    Brewhound.com.

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/23/2018 - If you’re looking for a great gluten-free Mexican-style favorite that is sure to be a big hit at dinner or at your next potluck, try these green chili enchiladas with roasted cauliflower. The recipe calls for chicken, but they are just as delicious when made vegetarian using just the roasted cauliflower. Either way, these enchiladas will disappear fast. Roasted cauliflower gives these green chili chicken enchiladas a deep, smokey flavor that diners are sure to love.
    Ingredients:
    2 cans gluten-free green chili enchilada sauce (I use Hatch brand) 1 small head cauliflower, roasted and chopped 6 ounces chicken meat, browned ½ cup cotija cheese, crumbled ½ cup queso fresco, diced 1 medium onion, diced ⅓ cup green onions, minced ¼ cup radishes, sliced 1 tablespoon cooking oil 1 cup chopped cabbage, for serving ½ cup sliced cherry or grape tomatoes, for serving ¼ cup cilantro, chopped 1 dozen fresh corn tortillas  ⅔ cup oil, for softening tortillas 1 large avocado, cut into small chunks Note: For a tasty vegetarian version, just omit the chicken, double the roasted cauliflower, and prepare according to directions.
    Directions:
    Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a cast iron or ovenproof pan until hot.
    Add chicken and brown lightly on both sides. 
    Remove chicken to paper towels to cool.
     
    Cut cauliflower into small pieces and place in the oiled pan.
    Roast in oven at 350F until browned on both sides.
    Remove from the oven when tender. 
    Allow roasted cauliflower to cool.
    Chop cauliflower, or break into small pieces and set aside.
    Chop cooled chicken and set aside.
    Heat 1 inch of cooking oil in a small frying pan.
    When oil is hot, use a spatula to submerge a tortilla in the oil and leave only long enough to soften, about 10 seconds or so. 
    Remove soft tortilla to a paper towel and repeat with remaining tortillas.
    Pour enough enchilada sauce to coat the bottom of a large casserole pan.
    Dunk a tortilla into the sauce and cover both sides. Add more sauce as needed.
    Fill each tortilla with bits of chicken, cauliflower, onion, and queso fresco, and roll into shape.
    When pan is full of rolled enchiladas, top with remaining sauce.
    Cook at 350F until sauce bubbles.
    Remove and top with fresh cotija cheese and scallions.
    Serve with rice, beans, and cabbage, and garnish with avocado, cilantro, and sliced grape tomatoes.

     

    Roxanne Bracknell
    Celiac.com 06/22/2018 - The rise of food allergies means that many people are avoiding gluten in recent times. In fact, the number of Americans who have stopped eating gluten has tripled in eight years between 2009 and 2017.
    Whatever your rationale for avoiding gluten, whether its celiac disease, a sensitivity to the protein, or any other reason, it can be really hard to find suitable places to eat out. When you’re on holiday in a new and unknown environment, this can be near impossible. As awareness of celiac disease grows around the world, however, more and more cities are opening their doors to gluten-free lifestyles, none more so than the 10 locations on the list below.
    Perhaps unsurprisingly, the U.S is a hotbed of gluten-free options, with four cities making the top 10, as well as the Hawaiian island of Maui. Chicago, in particular, is a real haven of gluten-free fare, with 240 coeliac-safe eateries throughout this huge city. The super hip city of Portland also ranks highly on this list, with the capital of counterculture rich in gluten-free cuisine, with San Francisco and Denver also included. Outside of the states, several prominent European capitals also rank very highly on the list, including Prague, the picturesque and historic capital of the Czech Republic, which boasts the best-reviewed restaurants on this list.
    The Irish capital of Dublin, meanwhile, has the most gluten-free establishments, with a huge 330 to choose from, while Amsterdam and Barcelona also feature prominently thanks to their variety of top-notch gluten-free fodder.
    Finally, a special mention must go to Auckland, the sole representative of Australasia in this list, with the largest city in New Zealand rounding out the top 10 thanks to its 180 coeliacsafe eateries.
    The full top ten gluten-free cities are shown in the graphic below:
     

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/21/2018 - Would you buy a house advertised as ‘gluten-free’? Yes, there really is such a house for sale. 
    It seems a Phoenix realtor Mike D’Elena is hoping that his trendy claim will catch the eye of a buyer hungry to avoid gluten, or, at least one with a sense of humor. D’Elena said he crafted the ads as a way to “be funny and to draw attention.” The idea, D’Elena said, is to “make it memorable.” 
    Though D’Elena’s marketing seeks to capitalizes on the gluten-free trend, he knows Celiac disease is a serious health issue for some people. “[W]e’re not here to offend anybody….this is just something we're just trying to do to draw attention and do what's best for our clients," he said. 
    Still, the signs seem to be working. D'elena had fielded six offers within a few days of listing the west Phoenix home.
    "Buying can sometimes be the most stressful thing you do in your entire life so why not have some fun with it," he said. 
    What do you think? Clever? Funny?
    Read more at Arizonafamily.com.

    Advertising Banner-Ads
    Bakery On Main started in the small bakery of a natural foods market on Main Street in Glastonbury, Connecticut. Founder Michael Smulders listened when his customers with Celiac Disease would mention the lack of good tasting, gluten-free options available to them. Upon learning this, he believed that nobody should have to suffer due to any kind of food allergy or dietary need. From then on, his mission became creating delicious and fearlessly unique gluten-free products that were clean and great tasting, while still being safe for his Celiac customers!
    Premium ingredients, bakeshop delicious recipes, and happy customers were our inspiration from the beginning— and are still the cornerstones of Bakery On Main today. We are a fiercely ethical company that believes in integrity and feels that happiness and wholesome, great tasting food should be harmonious. We strive for that in everything we bake in our dedicated gluten-free facility that is GFCO Certified and SQF Level 3 Certified. We use only natural, NON-GMO Project Verified ingredients and all of our products are certified Kosher Parve, dairy and casein free, and we have recently introduced certified Organic items as well! 
    Our passion is to bake the very best products while bringing happiness to our customers, each other, and all those we meet!
    We are available during normal business hours at: 1-888-533-8118 EST.
    To learn more about us at: visit our site.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/20/2018 - Currently, the only way to manage celiac disease is to eliminate gluten from the diet. That could be set to change as clinical trials begin in Australia for a new vaccine that aims to switch off the immune response to gluten. 
    The trials are set to begin at Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre. The vaccine is designed to allow people with celiac disease to consume gluten with no adverse effects. A successful vaccine could be the beginning of the end for the gluten-free diet as the only currently viable treatment for celiac disease. That could be a massive breakthrough for people with celiac disease.
    USC’s Clinical Trials Centre Director Lucas Litewka said trial participants would receive an injection of the vaccine twice a week for seven weeks. The trials will be conducted alongside gastroenterologist Dr. James Daveson, who called the vaccine “a very exciting potential new therapy that has been undergoing clinical trials for several years now.”
    Dr. Daveson said the investigational vaccine might potentially restore gluten tolerance to people with celiac disease.The trial is open to adults between the ages of 18 and 70 who have clinically diagnosed celiac disease, and have followed a strict gluten-free diet for at least 12 months. Anyone interested in participating can go to www.joinourtrials.com.
    Read more at the website for Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre.

    Source:
    FoodProcessing.com.au