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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/24/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What is Celiac Disease and the Gluten-Free Diet? What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    CANADIAN BEER INDUSTRY FROTHS OVER ALLERGY LABEL RULES


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 02/03/2011 - Okay, so Canadians take their beer seriously. Beer being one of the few things that might stoke the passions of some Canadians almost as much as, say, hockey.


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    So, proposed health regulations that would require beer labels to include a warning that beer is made with barley or wheat have the Canadian beer industry in a froth.

    Major players in the Canadian brewing industry are gearing up opposition over the proposed health regulations that would require just such labels, warning consumers that beer contains barley or wheat; something Canadian brewers liken to warning that ketchup contains tomatoes.

    The proposed rules are part of a larger set of regulatory changes Health Canada is seeking to make it easier for people with allergies to identify potential allergens in food ingredients.

    Health Canada statistics indicate that up to six per cent of children and up to four per cent of adults in Canada are believed to be affected by food allergies.

    People with serious allergies can go into shock or even die if they consume certain ingredients. Beer-label warnings are aimed especially at people with celiac disease.

    The proposed rules would require beer labels to "clearly and prominently" display a warning that says, "Allergy and intolerance information: Contains wheat."

    Barley-based beer labels would be required to include a warning that says, "Allergy and intolerance information: Contains barley."

    Canadian beer companies say the measure is not necessary, pointing out that people with celiac disease represent only about one per cent of the Canadian population, and tend to be well informed about the foods they should avoid.

    "These people are very well educated," said Andre Fortin, a spokesman for the Brewers Association of Canada, whose members produce 97 per cent of the beer brewed in Canada. "If a Canadian doctor diagnoses you with celiac disease, you're going to know that beer is not ideal for your system."

    The companies also point out small breweries might be hit especially hard by the labeling regulations. A number of breweries such as Steam Whistle Brewery and Mill St. Brewery sell their beer in vintage-style glass bottles with ceramic paint, which beer stores return to the companies, to clean and refill for reuse. Such companies might have to order new bottles to accommodate such regulations. The move could cost them millions of dollars, they say.

    However, for people who support allergy labeling requirements, the matter is serious. "This isn't just a bunch of fusspots," said Gwen Smith, editor of Allergic Living, a magazine and website that has long lobbied for the regulations. "This is about, 'How do I feed my children at dinner safely?' 'How do I feed myself?'"

    In addition to beer, new rules will apply to allergens derived from a wide range of foods, including almonds, cashews, hazelnuts, pecans, pistachios, sesame seeds, eggs, milk, soybeans, crustaceans, shellfish and fish.

    A review conducted nearly a decade ago for Health Canada estimated that implementing the proposed regulations would cost the Canadian food industry $102 million over two years, with annual costs of $13 million. The department expects the changes will cost the Canadian Food Inspection Agency $3 million annually, and Health Canada about $1 million per year.

    Health officials say that the cost of the implementing the proposed rules could be offset by some cost savings for the health-care system, since people with allergies would require less treatment. The department says the regulations are similar to those already in place in the United States, Europe, Australia and New Zealand.

    A spokesman said that after publication of the final version of the regulations, the food industry will have 18 months to comply.

    "The new labeling regulations are designed to ensure that consumers have the information they need to make appropriate choices and that this information is provided in a clear and consistent manner," the department said in a statement.

    Read more: Canada.com



    Image Caption: New gluten label rules meet strong opposition by Canadian Beer Industry. Photo: CC-jaygoldman
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    I may have to go live in Canada. Can't get the U.S. to change it's labeling laws to include rye and barley!!!!

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    Guest Shelley Case

    Posted

    Thank you Jefferson for your article on this very important issue that affects over 2.8 million Canadians with allergies and celiac disease. For the past 2 weeks the beer industry in Canada has been very vocal in its criticism of Health Canada's proposed new labeling regulations of foods and beverages. These regulations have been in development and consultation with numerous stakeholders since 1993 and were planned to be enacted in early 2011. It would require the major allergens, gluten sources and sulphites to be declared on the ingredient label of foods and beverages. The beer industry is trying to make this a story about beer and barley and derail the government from passing these essential regulations. Individuals with allergies and celiac disease absolutely need to know what ingredients are added to everything they consume for their health and safety.

     

    I would like to clarify some information in your article and provide further background information:

     

    1. Health Canada conducted numerous consultations with stakeholders including the food and beverage industry, health professionals, patient and consumer groups before and after the proposed regulations were posted in Part 1 of the Canada Gazette in July 2008. As a result they have made further changes to the regulations. Manufacturers will no longer have to state “Allergy and Intolerance Information: Contains:â€. Instead they will only have to declare the words “Contains:â€

    www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/label-etiquet/allergen/proj1220-modifications-eng.php

     

    2.This statement is not quite accurate: “The proposed rules are part of a larger set of regulatory changes Health Canada is seeking to make it easier for people with allergies to identify potential allergens in food ingredientsâ€. Should read that… easier for people with allergies and celiac disease to identify allergens, gluten sources and sulphites in foods and beverages.

     

    3. The beer, wine and distilled spirit industry in the US have been required to declare sulphites on the label since 1987 and this is one of the proposed changes in Canada. In addition, allergens used in beer manufacturing including fining agents (such as isinglass made from the bladders of fish), milk or eggs would also need to be disclosed.

     

     

     

    4.This statement needs a response : "These people are very well educated," said Andre Fortin, a spokesman for the Brewers Association of Canada, whose members produce 97 per cent of the beer brewed in Canada. "If a Canadian doctor diagnoses you with celiac disease, you're going to know that beer is not ideal for your system." Not everyone knows that beer contains barley or wheat. Most MD's usually do not give advice about the gluten-free diet due to lack of time and expertise about this very complex diet. Also many patients are not referred to a dietitian for comprehensive education about the diet. And not all those with celiac disease belong to a celiac support group. So the declaration of allergens, gluten sources and sulphites on the ingredient label is critical so that consumers can determine whether a product is safe to consume.

     

     

     

    5. The beer industry, along with other alcoholic beverage and food manufacturers, were told by Health Canada back in 2007 to plan for changes to their labels due to the forthcoming proposed regulations. Once these regulations are enacted they still will have 18 months to comply. It is very interesting that the food manufacturers, as well as distilled alcohol and wine industries, have not fought this regulation and face the same requirements to change their labels. Many have already revised their labels in anticipation of the proposed regulations being enacted.

     

    March 23, 2007 CFIA issues allergen labelling alert to industry www.inspection.gc.ca/english/corpaffr/recarapp/2007/20070323e.shtml

     

    Reminder notice March 11, 2009 www.inspection.gc.ca/english/fssa/invenq/inform/allerge.shtml

     

    July 22, 2008 HC strongly urge manufacturers to declare major food allergens, gluten sources and sulphites (over 10ppm) www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/label-etiquet/allergen/guide_ligne_direct_indust-eng.php

     

    An open letter to Prime Minister Harper was sent by many allergy and celiac groups expressing their concerns about the delay and urging the government to pass this legislation immediately.

     

    www.celiac.ca/press/Group_Letter_to_Prime_Minister_Harper_Feb_2_2011.pdf

     

    We encourage everyone in Canada to contact the Prime Minister - pm@pm.gc.ca as well as their Member of Parliament requesting that this very important legislation be enacted swiftly without any further delays!

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    Respectfully, I don't understand this...at all. It is the responsibility for celiacs to ensure that everything they consume is gluten free. If you don't know, you don't eat or drink it. I also think that most adult celiacs are fully aware that ANY "regular" beer is not gluten free. Never will be. Traditional beer will never be gluten free, and unless a beer says it is a gluten free brand, it will have gluten. This was one of the first things I learned as a new adult onset celiac, and my MD gave me no information or dietitian consult whatsoever. Someone savvy enough to read labels usually knows how to find books, pamphlets, classes, or websites on gluten free living. To me, this argument is like requiring peanut butter to be labeled as "Containing peanuts....do not consume if you have a peanut allergy". The real problem here is a lack of patient education. Food items which may or may not contain hidden gluten MUST be properly labeled and lack of regulation is a problem right now. An item known to be made directly from a gluten source (I.e. beer) should be part of general celiac education, IMHO. While labeling is never a bad thing, if the beer industry doesn't want to, leave them alone. I feel our concern as celiacs should be food labels (hidden gluten sources) and expanding patient education.

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    Beer labeling is needed. There was so much to remember when I first was diagnosed that it can be a big help to us and those who want to have us over for dinner.

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    admin

    Celiac.com 09/01/2005 - The Gluten Intolerance Group® is pleased to announce our gluten-free food certification program, the Gluten Free Certification Organization (GFCO), the first program of its kind in the world! This new independent food processing inspection program will verify that food products meet the highest standards for gluten-free ingredients and a safe processing environment. Food products meeting these high standards will receive our gluten-free certification mark, allowing gluten-free consumers to easily identify foods that are free of gluten and possible cross-contamination from gluten.
    Key elements of the GFCO process include:
    Ingredients review, down to the original supplier Onsite inspections by experienced, trained independent (third party) Field Inspection Agents Product and ingredient testing using scientifically AOAC approved testing methods GFCO certification mark located on product packages for easy identification
    Gluten-free you can easily see
    Products labeled with the gluten-free certification mark allow consumers to easily identify products that have been independently verified to meet the highest standards for gluten-free ingredients and safe processing environment.
    First major food companies to adopt GFCO supervision and labeling Enjoy Life Foods and PureFit Nutrition Bar are the first food manufacturers to join the GFCO supervision program. These pioneering companies will display the gluten-free certification mark on their food products in the near future.
    GFCO maintains a system of independent verification through plant visits to assure that there have been no changes that might compromise its gluten-free status. GFCO certification uses the highest standards for gluten-free ingredients and safe processing environment, and cannot be altered or compromised. The GFCO certification standards exceed the requirements of current government laws and regulations. The voluntary participation of companies in this program will ensure public confidence in the gluten-free status of their products.
    The GFCO was developed in cooperation with the Food Services, Inc., a subsidiary of the Orthodox Union (the "OU"), the worlds largest and oldest kosher certification agency. The OUs nearly 500 field representatives, proficient in modern food production techniques and chemical and biological processes, will conduct plant inspections and product reviews for the GFCO. Like the Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval, the logo, one of the worlds best-known trademarks, instills confidence in the purchaser that the product has passed inspection and meets high quality standards. For more information visit: http://www.oukosher.org.
    The Gluten-Free Certification Organizations (GFCO) mission is to provide an independent service to supervise gluten-free food production according to a consistent, defined, science-based standard, that is confirmed by field inspections, in order to achieve heightened consumer confidence and safety. GFCO is governed by an independent volunteer board that includes physicians, food scientists and consumers. For more information visit: http://www.gfco.org, or call 206-246-6652.
    The Gluten Intolerance Group® (GIG)s mission is to increase awareness by providing accurate, up-to-date information, education and support for those with gluten intolerance, celiac disease/dermatitis herpetiformis, their families, health care professionals and the general public. GIGs volunteers, staff, and Board are knowledgeable, and our materials and resources are credible. GIGs Medical Advisory Board approves all education materials. For more information visit: http://www.gluten.net.

    Destiny Stone
    Celiac.com 05/17/2010 - Finding gluten-free food is hard enough without having to worry if your "gluten-free" labeled food is really gluten-free. For those of us that become increasingly ill from ingesting a small amount of gluten, improper  food labeling can  be a matter of life or death.
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    Health Canada Source:
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    admin
    Celiac.com 08/05/2013 - People with celiac disease can now have confidence in the meaning of a "gluten-free" label on foods.
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    Jefferson Adams
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    The team enrolled fifty adults with symptoms and indications of celiac disease in a prospective cohort without regard to the final diagnosis.  At baseline, all individuals underwent cognitive functional and psychological evaluation. The team then compared celiac disease patients with subjects without celiac disease, and with healthy controls matched by sex, age, and education.
    Celiac disease patients had similar cognitive performance and anxiety, but no significant differences in depression scores compared with disease controls.
    A total of thirty-three subjects were diagnosed with celiac disease. Compared with the 26 healthy control subjects, the 17 celiac disease subjects, and the 17 disease control subjects, who mostly had irritable bowel syndrome, showed impaired cognitive performance (P=0.02 and P=0.04, respectively), functional impairment (P<0.01), and higher depression (P<0.01). 
    From their data, the team noted that any abnormal cognitive functions they saw in adults with newly diagnosed celiac disease did not seem not to be a result of the disease itself. 
    Their results indicate that cognitive dysfunction in celiac patients could be related to long-term symptoms from chronic disease, in general.
    Source:
    J Clin Gastroenterol. 2018 Mar 1. doi: 10.1097/MCG.0000000000001018.

    Connie Sarros
    Celiac.com 04/21/2018 - Dear Friends and Readers,
    I have been writing articles for Scott Adams since the 2002 Summer Issue of the Scott-Free Press. The Scott-Free Press evolved into the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. I felt honored when Scott asked me ten years ago to contribute to his quarterly journal and it's been a privilege to write articles for his publication ever since.
    Due to personal health reasons and restrictions, I find that I need to retire. My husband and I can no longer travel the country speaking at conferences and to support groups (which we dearly loved to do) nor can I commit to writing more books, articles, or menus. Consequently, I will no longer be contributing articles to the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. 
    My following books will still be available at Amazon.com:
    Gluten-free Cooking for Dummies Student's Vegetarian Cookbook for Dummies Wheat-free Gluten-free Dessert Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Reduced Calorie Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Cookbook for Kids and Busy Adults (revised version) My first book was published in 1996. My journey since then has been incredible. I have met so many in the celiac community and I feel blessed to be able to call you friends. Many of you have told me that I helped to change your life – let me assure you that your kind words, your phone calls, your thoughtful notes, and your feedback throughout the years have had a vital impact on my life, too. Thank you for all of your support through these years.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/20/2018 - A digital media company and a label data company are teaming up to help major manufacturers target, reach and convert their desired shoppers based on dietary needs, such as gluten-free diet. The deal could bring synergy in emerging markets such as the gluten-free and allergen-free markets, which represent major growth sectors in the global food industry. 
    Under the deal, personalized digital media company Catalina will be joining forces with Label Insight. Catalina uses consumer purchases data to target shoppers on a personal base, while Label Insight works with major companies like Kellogg, Betty Crocker, and Pepsi to provide insight on food label data to government, retailers, manufacturers and app developers.
    "Brands with very specific product benefits, gluten-free for example, require precise targeting to efficiently reach and convert their desired shoppers,” says Todd Morris, President of Catalina's Go-to-Market organization, adding that “Catalina offers the only purchase-based targeting solution with this capability.” 
    Label Insight’s clients include food and beverage giants such as Unilever, Ben & Jerry's, Lipton and Hellman’s. Label Insight technology has helped the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) build the sector’s very first scientifically accurate database of food ingredients, health attributes and claims.
    Morris says the joint partnership will allow Catalina to “enhance our dataset and further increase our ability to target shoppers who are currently buying - or have shown intent to buy - in these emerging categories,” including gluten-free, allergen-free, and other free-from foods.
    The deal will likely make for easier, more precise targeting of goods to consumers, and thus provide benefits for manufacturers and retailers looking to better serve their retail food customers, especially in specialty areas like gluten-free and allergen-free foods.
    Source:
    fdfworld.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/19/2018 - Previous genome and linkage studies indicate the existence of a new disease triggering mechanism that involves amino acid metabolism and nutrient sensing signaling pathways. In an effort to determine if amino acids might play a role in the development of celiac disease, a team of researchers recently set out to investigate if plasma amino acid levels differed among children with celiac disease compared with a control group.
     
    The research team included Åsa Torinsson Naluai, Ladan Saadat Vafa, Audur H. Gudjonsdottir, Henrik Arnell, Lars Browaldh, and Daniel Agardh. They are variously affiliated with the Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Karolinska University Hospital and Division of Pediatrics, CLINTEC, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institute, Sodersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Diabetes & Celiac Disease Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; and with the Nathan S Kline Institute in the U.S.A.
    First, the team used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS) to analyze amino acid levels in fasting plasma samples from 141 children with celiac disease and 129 non-celiac disease controls. They then crafted a general linear model using age and experimental effects as covariates to compare amino acid levels between children with celiac disease and non-celiac control subjects.
    Compared with the control group, seven out of twenty-three children with celiac disease showed elevated levels of the the following amino acids: tryptophan; taurine; glutamic acid; proline; ornithine; alanine; and methionine.
    The significance of the individual amino acids do not survive multiple correction, however, multivariate analyses of the amino acid profile showed significantly altered amino acid levels in children with celiac disease overall and after correction for age, sex and experimental effects.
    This study shows that amino acids can influence inflammation and may play a role in the development of celiac disease.
    Source:
    PLoS One. 2018; 13(3): e0193764. doi: & 10.1371/journal.pone.0193764