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    House Appropriations Bill Addresses Celiac Disease


    Scott Adams

    The House of Representatives has, once again, acknowledged celiac disease. It has passed the funding bill for the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), which includes the NIH. The report language detailed below was included in that legislation. This language serves as guidance from Congress to the NIH to focus on certain issues (in this case celiac disease).


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    A special round of thanks is due Representative Nita Lowey (D-NY) for her tireless efforts on behalf of the celiac community. Further thanks go out to Representative Ralph Regula (R-OH), Chairman, House Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor-HHS-Education, for his leadership on this important bill.

    We now wait to see what happens with the Senate version of the funding bill, and whether it is passed before the Congress adjourns later this month.

    HR 5006; Passed House on Sept. 9, 2004
    House Report. 108-636

    "Celiac disease.--The Committee commends NIDDK for recognizing the lack of understanding, and under-diagnosis of the genetic, autoimmune disorder, Celiac disease (celiac disease), and for including celiac disease in the NIH Consensus Development Program for 2004. Although readily diagnosed in European countries, it takes on average eleven years for Americans to be properly diagnosed. Delays in diagnosis place individuals at risk for osteoporosis, anemia, miscarriages, and small bowel cancer. Current evidence demonstrates that celiac disease is the most common genetic disorder in the world, with a treatment-- strict, gluten-free diet--that can be managed almost exclusively by the individual, or family. Education about celiac disease is needed for health care professionals and patients. The Committee encourages NIDDK to coordinate informational and educational programs directed at health professionals, patients and the public to raise awareness and understanding about celiac disease, and the need for early diagnosis."

    A copy of the report is available at: http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/cpquery/R?cp108:FLD010:@1(hr636):

    Allison Herwitt
    Co-Chair, Legislative Project
    American Celiac Task Force

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  • About Me

    In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease. In 1998 I founded The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore!, and I am the co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

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    Jefferson Adams
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    Roxanne Bracknell
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    Jefferson Adams
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    Bakery On Main started in the small bakery of a natural foods market on Main Street in Glastonbury, Connecticut. Founder Michael Smulders listened when his customers with Celiac Disease would mention the lack of good tasting, gluten-free options available to them. Upon learning this, he believed that nobody should have to suffer due to any kind of food allergy or dietary need. From then on, his mission became creating delicious and fearlessly unique gluten-free products that were clean and great tasting, while still being safe for his Celiac customers!
    Premium ingredients, bakeshop delicious recipes, and happy customers were our inspiration from the beginning— and are still the cornerstones of Bakery On Main today. We are a fiercely ethical company that believes in integrity and feels that happiness and wholesome, great tasting food should be harmonious. We strive for that in everything we bake in our dedicated gluten-free facility that is GFCO Certified and SQF Level 3 Certified. We use only natural, NON-GMO Project Verified ingredients and all of our products are certified Kosher Parve, dairy and casein free, and we have recently introduced certified Organic items as well! 
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