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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Mixed Green and Roasted Beet Salad with Gorgonzola, Pear and Arugula (Gluten-Free)

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Gorgonzola is a veined Italian blue cheese, made from unskimmed cow's and/or goat's milk.

    Photo: CC--PandafoodieContrary to popular belief, Gorgonzola, or blue cheese does NOT contain gluten. These days, blue cheese is no longer made with mold from stale bread as a starter, as it was once upon a time. The molds used to make commercial Gorgonzola and blue cheese are isolated for purity, and cultured in sterile conditions. They are gluten-free. That means that most people with celiac disease and gluten intolerance are free to eat most all blue cheeses.

    To celebrate that fact, I recently prepared a delicious beet salad with Gorgonzola, pear and arugula, which is one of my summer favorites. I just couldn't wait for summer to get started.

    This recipe makes a tasty, refreshing salad that will turn heads and delight tastebuds.

    Ingredients:
    3 red beets, peeled, roasted and diced
    1 firm Bosc or D'Anjou pear, diced
    1 tablespoon lemon juice
    4 ounces crumbled Gorgonzola or mild blue cheese
    ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
    1 tablespoon honey
    ¼ cup balsamic vinegar
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    ¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
    2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
    1 large shallot, peeled and chopped
    4 ounces of mixed lettuce, washed
    2 ounces arugula, washed
    1 seedless tangerine, peeled
    ⅓ cup walnuts, halved, optional

    Directions:
    Heat oven to 350° F.

    Wash the beets, leave them wet, and wrap each one in foil. Arrange beets in roasting pan or on baking sheet; bake 90 minutes or until tender. Test by opening the foil and poking with a thin knife.

    Note: I often make my beets ahead of time, or make more beets than I need, then dice and refrigerate so I can make more salad later.

    Leave beets covered and allow to cool on a plate.

    Dice beets and pear pieces, and toss with lemon juice in a small bowl.

    In a separate bowl, combine oil, vinegar, honey, dijon mustard, shallot, salt, and pepper. Whisk these together until blended.

    Make sure beets and pears are at room temperature.

    Place roughly chopped greens and arugula in a bowl.

    Top with pears, beets, tangerine slices, and cheese, and drizzle with vinaigrette. Add walnuts as desired.

    Serve alongside your favorite burger or steak.


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    Guest Melaina at Rudi's Gluten-Free Bakery

    Posted

    This recipe sounds delicious! Such a fresh and healthy salad perfect for this warm time of year, and the best part - naturally gluten-free! Great job! :)

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    How could you make such a misleading blanket statement about blue cheese being gluten-free? At the end of the paragraph you state "most all", but how many will see that when you start the paragraph with "blue cheese does NOT contain gluten". I have contacted several manufacturers asking if their bleu cheese is gluten-free and have been told that they use a BARLEY ENZYME. We all know barley is NOT gluten-free.

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    Guest marketing@celiac.com

    Posted

    How could you make such a misleading blanket statement about blue cheese being gluten-free? At the end of the paragraph you state "most all", but how many will see that when you start the paragraph with "blue cheese does NOT contain gluten". I have contacted several manufacturers asking if their bleu cheese is gluten-free and have been told that they use a BARLEY ENZYME. We all know barley is NOT gluten-free.

    Which manufacturers were those? Please let us know if you have any information confirming gluten content in blue cheeses and we will update the article.

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    How could you make such a misleading blanket statement about blue cheese being gluten-free? At the end of the paragraph you state "most all", but how many will see that when you start the paragraph with "blue cheese does NOT contain gluten". I have contacted several manufacturers asking if their bleu cheese is gluten-free and have been told that they use a BARLEY ENZYME. We all know barley is NOT gluten-free.

    Blue cheese facts:

    Analysis of blue cheese samples conducted by "Dr. Terry Koerner's laboratory in the Food Research Division at Health Canada. Three different commercial ELISA test kits were used."

    5 blue cheese / mold samples tested: 3 blue cheese samples made with mold cultured on gluten-containing media, two samples of mold cultured on wheat-based dextrose.

    Results: Each sample was tested 3 times, using each of the 3 ELISA tests.

    No detectable levels of gluten were found in any of the samples.

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    I made this not caring it was gluten-free. I wanted a new take on a beet salad. I was not disappointed . My guests raved and my husband wants it again. I got produce at a local farmers market so the salad was super fresh. I used mandarin oranges as tangerines were not available.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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