Jump to content
  • Sign Up
Celiac.com Sponsor:


Celiac.com Sponsor:

  • Join Our Community!

    Get help in our celiac / gluten-free forum.

  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Mucosal Healing and Risk for Lymphoproliferative Malignancy in Celiac Disease

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 09/25/2013 - People with celiac disease have higher rates of lymphoproliferative malignancy. Currently, doctors just don't know whether risk levels are affected by the results of follow-up intestinal biopsy, performed to document mucosal healing.

    Photo: CC--ParlA team of researchers recently tried to find out if overall risk for lymphoproliferative malignancy in people with celiac disease is connected with levels of mucosal healing. The research team included Benjamin Lebwohl, MD, MS; Fredrik Granath, PhD; Anders Ekbom, MD, PhD; Karin E. Smedby, MD, PhD; Joseph A. Murray, MD; Alfred I. Neugut, MD, PhD; Peter H.R. Green, MD; and Jonas F. Ludvigsson, MD, PhD.


    Celiac.com Sponsor:



    The are variously affiliate with the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York; Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota; and Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.

    For their population-based cohort study, the team looked at data from all 28 pathology departments in Sweden. They evaluated at data for 7625 patients with celiac disease who received follow-up biopsy after initial diagnosis.

    Measurements: They used expected rates to assess risk for LPM, compared with that of the general population. They then used Cox regression to compare rates of LPM in patients with persistent villous atrophy against rates for patients with mucosal healing.

    Of the 7625 patients with celiac disease and follow-up biopsy, 3308 (43%) showed persistent villous atrophy. Overall risk levels for LPM were higher for celiac patients who had received biopsy (standardized incidence ratio [sIR], 2.81 [95% CI, 2.10 to 3.67]) than for the general population. LPM risk levels were higher for celiac patients with persistent villous atrophy (SIR, 3.78 [CI, 2.71 to 5.12]) than for those with mucosal healing (SIR, 1.50 [CI, 0.77 to 2.62]).

    Compared with mucosal healing, persistent villous atrophy was associated with an increased risk for LPM (hazard ratio


    , 2.26 [CI, 1.18 to 4.34]). Risk for T-cell lymphoma was higher (HR, 3.51 [CI, 0.75 to 16.34]), but not for B-cell lymphoma (HR, 0.97 [CI, 0.21 to 4.49]).

    One limitation of the study is that it gathered no data about patient adherence to a gluten-free diet.

    Higher risk for LPM in celiac disease is connected with follow-up biopsy results, with a higher risk among patients with persistent villous atrophy.

    Follow-up biopsy may be an effective way to classify celiac disease patients by risk for subsequent LPM.

    Source:


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments



    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, science, and advanced research, and scientific methods. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

×
×
  • Create New...