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  • Scott Adams
    Scott Adams

    National Institute of Health Cuts May Decrease Celiac Disease Funding

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 12/27/2005 - Funding for NIH (including the NIDDK which conducts critical research into Celiac disease) in next years Labor-HHS Appropriations Bill is only slightly above last years levels-inadequate to compensate for inflation and the development of promising research. However, Congress is also in the process of approving a 1% across-the-board cut to ALL discretionary programs (except Veterans programs)-including NIH.

    This cut will decrease the NIH funding level for the first time in a generation and put in mortal jeporady the research that can lead to treatments and eventually a cure for Celiac disease. Not only will this cut affect the work of NIH for this year, but will set back medical research into Celiac disease for many years to come.


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    Because the Celiac community relies heavily on research conducted by NIH, it is critical that individuals speak out against this bill. Because of the low NIH funding, the Celiac community must demand that the Labor-HHS appropriations bill be rejected, and a new bill that addresses the funding needs of NIH be enacted.

    The bill has passed the House of Representatives and awaits a vote in the Senate. If you have not yet contacted your Senator to ask for their no vote on this bill, please do so now. If you have, please do so again. To reach your Senator, call the Capitol switchboard at (202) 224-3121 and ask to be connected with the offices of your states Senators.

    The progress of vital research for Celiac disease and countless other ailments and conditions lies in the balance. Please do your part and speak out!

    Jonathan R Pawlow, Jr.
    Digestive Disease National Coalition
    507 Capitol Court, NE, Suite 200
    Washington, DC 20002
    202-544-7497
    202-546-7105 (fax)
    Pawlow@HMCW.org

    NIH Appropriations Update

    Continue to urge congress to support biomedical research in the final fiscal year 2006 labor-hhs-education appropriations bill

    The United States Senate was expected to vote on the fiscal year 2006 appropriations bill for the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education last week. The health communitys advocacy in opposition to the Labor-HHS-Education appropriations bill had an impact in the Senate, as Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist (R-TN) set aside a vote on the bill.

    However, on Sunday, December 18th, the House passed the fiscal year 2006 Defense appropriations bill, which included a 1% reduction in appropriations for all federal programs excluding veterans assistance. This means the budget for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) would receive a cut in funding, leaving the budget below fiscal year 2005 levels, if the Senate approves the fiscal year 2006 Labor-HHS-Education appropriations bill. The Senate is expected to vote this week, as early as today, on the bill.

    Requested Action:

    Please contact your senators immediately and urge them to vote no on the Labor-HHS Appropriations Conference Report. in addition, ask them to restore funding for NIH in the bill to the level originally called for in the senate version of the legislation ($29.3 billion).

    To contact your senators, please visit www.senate.gov or call the U.S. Capitol switchboard at (202) 224-3121.


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    From my reading, celiac disease/gluten sensitivity is rising because of continuing genetic modification of wheat. In addition, bits of wheat (more or less) are included in a large portion of our processed foods, making it difficult to avoid. Cultures where the diet is not wheat based have little or no problem with celiac disease/gluten sensitivity.

    I prefer to address the issue in the area of prevention, as in admitting that this genetically modified wheat is potentially bad for as much as a third of our population (the number estimated to carry the gene for celiac disease). I do not think the answer is finding a new high priced drug to help control the symptoms of a disease that is a growing problem because of the way we have genetically modified one of our basic foods, then put it in the majority of foods we eat other than fresh fruits and vegetables and unseasoned dried foods.

    I would like to see more publicity to make the public aware that many of their health problems may be related to gluten sensitivity. I would like to see a greater effort on the part of food production companies to label all gluten sources and to find alternatives to the bits of gluten in food that probably are not necessary, but can cause great harm to the sensitive.

    I would like to see greater caution in the genetic modification of our food.

    Prevention keeps health care costs down. A new high priced drug for a disease that will then be well publicized will shoot health care costs vastly higher again, unnecessarily, I believe.

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  • About Me

    Celiac.com's Founder and CEO, Scott was diagnosed with celiac disease  in 1994, and, due to the nearly total lack of information available at that time, was forced to become an expert on the disease in order to recover. Scott launched the site that later became Celiac.com in 1995 "To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives."  In 1998 he founded The Gluten-Free Mall which he sold in 2014. He is co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

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