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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    New Belgium's Glütiny Ale Shows a New Way to Do "Gluten-free"

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 04/22/2016 - To label a beer 'gluten-free' it must contain no gluten ingredients from start to finish. But, without wheat or barley, how does a brewer create the foundation for the beer?

    Photo: New Belgium Brewing, Inc.One problem gluten-free beers have is that, because they are brewed without wheat and/or barley, they are technically not beers under German beer laws, whatever their legal status here. Another issue is that since purely gluten-free beers must be brewed with all gluten-free ingredients, they have been often regarded as lackluster in the taste department, especially by beer connoisseurs, gluten-free or not.

    In an effort to provide a genuine, high quality beer for those suffering from celiac disease, and get beyond the taste limitations of totally gluten-free beers, a new generation of beer makers are using traditional ingredients and innovative methods of to remove up to 99.99 percent, or more, of the gluten molecules from the brew before bottling.

    The result is a beer that tests under 20ppm gluten levels, and which tastes like a genuine traditionally brewed wheat- or barley-based beers.

    One of the latest and perhaps best of the gluten-reduced beers on the market is Glütiny Pale Ale from Colorado's New Belgium Brewery. It's sited beer, Glütiny Pale Ale, isn't bad either.

    To make Glütiny, New Belgum uses a special enzyme during the brewing process that breaks down the gluten to well under the FDA standards for gluten-free products.

    According to Tim Dohms, of Hopjacks Pizza Kitchen and Taproom, "where most American pale ale is more floral with muted citrus notes, Glütiny showcases a big, dynamic flavor profile."

    Source:


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    It would be a very poor cider brewer that added anything containing gluten to the brew. It's apples, yeast and maybe some sugar. It's more likely either:

    A) tummy bug

    B) something you ate.

    I must agree

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    Why waste time on gluten free beer. For those willing to move on from celiac disease and get well...follow the rabbit hole. I did last week and I can't wait to feel good again.

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    Redbridge is labeled as gluten free and is gluten free. From their website: "We select only the highest quality ingredients and take every measure to ensure the beer contains no wheat or barley. How is that possible? Simple. Redbridge is made from sorghum, a safe grain for those allergic to wheat or gluten, and no blending or mixing of the ingredients takes place in order to preserve its purity. We then apply the true art of brewing – from the brewhouse process through fermentation and aging – to give Redbridge its hand crafted quality and specialty beer taste."

    Yes, but it just isn't real beer according to the German Reineheitsgebot, and you can taste this.

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    Yes, this article indicates that Mass Spectrometry is indeed accurate at determining the peptide quantity of hordein and wheat in beers: "MS quantification is undertaken using peptides that are specific and unique, enabling the quantification of individual hordein isoforms."

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    Yes, this article indicates that Mass Spectrometry is indeed accurate at determining the peptide quantity of hordein and wheat in beers: "MS quantification is undertaken using peptides that are specific and unique, enabling the quantification of individual hordein isoforms."

    Agreed. It also says that R5 Elisa is not as good as mass spec. It's a shame gluten removed beers don't use mass spec to check for gluten content. If they did we could determine if they were safe for us.

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    Agreed. It also says that R5 Elisa is not as good as mass spec. It's a shame gluten removed beers don't use mass spec to check for gluten content. If they did we could determine if they were safe for us.

    Several, including Omission, have used mass spec to prove their beers are safe--yet there are still people and groups out there who continue to ignore these results and claim that even mass spec isn't reliable enough, and that these companies should somehow be responsible for funding studies to prove that mass spec works on their beers!

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    Several, including Omission, have used mass spec to prove their beers are safe--yet there are still people and groups out there who continue to ignore these results and claim that even mass spec isn't reliable enough, and that these companies should somehow be responsible for funding studies to prove that mass spec works on their beers!

    I had no idea omission also did mass spec! This is good news.

    Some people don't trust science, which is sad.

    Better living through chemistry!!!

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    Celiac.com reports news related to celiac disease and the gluten-free diet...we are not promoting this any more than any other news that we report. We have no financial connection with this company, and all of our advertising is disclosed as advertising.

    Where can I buy this beer New Belgium Glütiny Pale Ale?

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    I went out to a local bar this weekend sad that I couldn't drink beer due to my gluten sensitivity. I tried some wine and then was looking for something else to wet my whistle when the bartender said, we have A (meaning one) "gluten free beer." I tried it and he was like, "how is it?" I was trying to be polite but blurted out, "it's o.k. but it's not beer." It was a Daura. I was sad. I was really hoping for a nice gluten free beer experience. Before I quit gluten I was drinking Guiness and Sierra Nevada pale ale and other beers with quite a bit of taste. Last night at our local specialty market, Earthfare I spotted this "Glutiny" Pale Ale from New Belgium. I really love all of NB's other beers so I tried it out. It is amazingly wonderful and flavorful and rich and like drinking real beer. I read the label and was confused when it basically said, "we took out the gluten, but can't guarantee this is gluten free." This article and the subsequent comments really explains things and I'm happy to report that I drank this last night with my gluten-free bun and mushroom Swiss burger and it felt like old times with yummy beer and burger combo, just gluten-free too!

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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