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  • Jefferson Adams

    New FDA Gluten-Free Label Rules Include Dietary Supplements

    Jefferson Adams
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 09/12/2013 - Good news for consumers of gluten-free foods and other products: The FDA's new standards for the labeling of gluten-free food and other products apply to all foods and products labeled gluten-free, including dietary supplements and vitamins.

    GIEThe FDA rules state that any product declaring the contents to be "gluten-free," "no gluten," "free of gluten" or "without gluten," must meet all parts of FDA's gluten-free definition, including the requirement that the food contains less than 20 parts per million of gluten.



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    People with celiac disease who consume gluten from wheat, rye, or barley risk gradual damage to the intestines, leading to poor absorption of vitamins and minerals and leading to a host of other health problems, including nutritional deficiencies, osteoporosis, miscarriages, and cancer," according to Virginia Cox, Associate Commissioner of FDA's Office of External Affairs.

    Creating uniform rules and conditions for the use of the term 'gluten-free' in the labeling of foods and other products is "necessary to ensure that individuals with celiac disease are not misled and are provided with truthful and accurate information with respect to foods so labeled, " according to the text of the final rule, which was published last week in the Federal Register.

    FDA projects the new requirements will yield annual health benefits of roughly $110 million, compared to estimated annual costs (related to testing and relabeling) of $7 million.

    Manufacturers of gluten-free foods and products will have one year to comply with the FDA's labeling requirements.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


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