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    Jefferson Adams

    New Study Shows Eating Oats Safe for Patients with Celiac Disease

    Jefferson Adams
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 05/30/2007 - The results of a study recently published in the Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology shows that patients with celiac disease can consume oats with no risk of adverse immunological effects.

    An international research team made up of doctors Tarja Kemppainen (1); Esko Janatuinen (2); Kati Holm (3); Veli-Matti Kosma (4); Markku Heikkinen (5); Markku Mäki (3); Kaija Laurila (3); Matti Uusitupa (1); Risto Julkunen (5), set out to evaluate local cellular immune response after 5 years of oat consumption by adult celiac patients.



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    The doctors looked at a group of 42 celiac patients who had previously participated in a 6-12 month oats intervention study.

    22 of these patients already incorporated oats as part of their gluten-free diet. During the 5-year follow-up study, 10 patients who were concerned about the safety of long-term oat consumption stopped eating oats. The 12 remaining patients consumed oats for the whole 5-year period. The remaining 20 celiac patients formed the control group, and followed a strict, conventional, gluten-free diet that excluded oats.

    The team conducted biopsies and counted Intraepithelial CD3, TCR (IEL) and TCR (IEL) T cells to determine corresponding densities.

    No Adverse Effects for Celiac Disease Patients Who Eat Oats

    The results showed no differences in the densities of CD3, IEL and IEL T cells between the oat and the control groups. The researchers concluded that the mucosa of the small intestine show no immunological response in celiac patients who consume oats over a long period of time.

    Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, Volume 42, Issue 1 2007 , pages 54 - 59

    Participating Institutions:

    • Department of Clinical Nutrition, University of Kuopio and Kuopio University Hospital. Kuopio. Finland
    • Department of General Medicine, Al Mafraq Hospital. Abu Dhabi, U.A.E.
    • Medical School, University of Tampere and Tampere University Hospital. Tampere. Finland
    • Department of Pathology and Forensic Medicine, University of Kuopio and Kuopio University Hospital.
    • Gastroenterological Unit, Department of Medicine, Kuopio University Hospital. Finland

    About the Author: Jefferson Adams is a freelance health writer who lives in San Francisco and is a frequent author of articles for Celiac.com.

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    Excellent article and exciting news IF...IF I want to try oats and take the chance that I won't be doubled over in pain for 3-4 days for eating oatmeal ...it's a scary thing. I was always told NO OATS...so...comments from those who eat oats but maintain an otherwise totally gluten-free diet?? Please share your experiences - good and bad. Thank you.

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    Many thanks, am a new diagnosed celiac disease patient and always glad to read news that I can stil eat some of my 'old' favorites.

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    That was a great article to read. I have to say I was skeptical about the whole you can not eat oats thing because I have the disease as well as my son and neither of us have ever had an adverse reaction to eating anything with oats or oat flour. Actually I was told it was ok in moderation. Again we have had no problems after eating anything containing oats. So for me this article just confirms what I was already sure of. Thanks for the research.

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    I was diagnosed with celiac disease five years ago and stopped eating oats at that time, according to the then prevailing wisdom. About a year later, research was already indicating that oats might be safe for celiacs and I tried them again with no adverse effects at all. I now have a daily bowl of porridge for breakfast and enjoy the occasional flapjack - they certainly add variety. Good to hear that on-going research has confirmed the earlier indicators!

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    Another study, also done last year, has shown that there is some variance between varieties of oats and their affect on celiacs - some types being distinctly unsafe:

    Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology 22 (4), 528–531.

    In vitro tests indicate that certain varieties of oats may be harmful to patients with coeliac disease

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    Guest Susan Callicoat

    Posted

    The first five comments make me feel confident that oats are safe to consume. The 6th comment makes me skeptical. Who is correct? These articles don't clearly state whether oats are safe are unsafe.

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    Please, please be true. I am expecting twins and do not want to take anymore risks. My husband on the other hand is going oats about this information, he just ordered gluten free oats and wants to add them to my diet. I developed Diabetes in my 2nd trimester and oats are highly recommended. No more Gluten Free snacks and or rice for me :(

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    I have read in a few places about research showing oats to be safe for coeliacs as long as they are certified as uncontaminated. I have two children who are desperate for a filling breakfast which Rice Krispies is not. What I have found is that despite the research and their gastro specialist saying that they may eat oats, I have the dieticians warning me against it. The inconsistency is extremely disturbing, and makes me nervous, as I want to do the best for my 2 coeliac children.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


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