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  • Jefferson Adams

    New UK Fund Promotes Celiac Research and Gluten-Free Food Improvement

    Jefferson Adams
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

      A new UK research fund looks to encourage better celiac diagnostics, expand digital self-care tools and enhance gluten-free food production.


    Image: CC--neiljs
    Caption: Image: CC--neiljs

    Celiac.com 07/10/2018 - As part of its 50th Anniversary activities, Celiac UK has launched a research fund and accompanying fundraising appeal to support new research and development. The fund has already received an injection of £500k from Innovate UK, in addition to £250k from the charity. 

    Together, Coeliac UK and Innovate UK have opened applications for grants from the £750,000. Researchers and businesses can apply for a grants ranging from £50k to £250k for healthcare diagnostics, digital self-care tools and better gluten free food production. 



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    Food businesses can receive grants by developing more nutritious and affordable gluten free food, by using new ingredients, improving nutritional value, flavor and/or texture, and creating better methods of preservation.

    The three main goals of the program are: To improve celiac disease diagnostics; to improve the quality of gluten-free foods, and to promote digitally supported self-care for people with celiac disease. 

    The matching industry funds will bring spending for new research on the growing global gluten-free foods market to nearly £1m.

    Ultimately, Coeliac UK is looking to raise £5 million to improve understanding and treatment of celiac disease and gluten related autoimmune conditions. 

    Sarah Sleet, Chief Executive of Coeliac UK said: “With the global diagnosis for coeliac disease increasing year on year, this is a chance for UK business and researchers to get ahead and develop competitive advantages in innovation which will be of benefit to a badly underserved patient group.

    Read more at: NewFoodMagazine.com

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


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